Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Aug. 22, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 15
An emerging view of evolution is informing cancer research

An emerging view of evolution is informing cancer research

Cancer cells can be as cooperative as a flock of birds, making individual decisions yet somehow acting in unison. A Stanford researcher is using this insight to make a computer model of cancer.

 
 
Compound kills pain as well as morphine but may lack overdose risk
 

Compound kills pain as well as morphine but may lack overdose risk

Morphine and similar drugs are the world’s most widely used painkillers. But they’re also dangerous and addictive. A new compound may be able to safely provide the same analgesia as morphine.

 
Researchers devise method for bone marrow transplants without using chemotherapy
 

Researchers devise method for bone marrow transplants without using chemotherapy

Scientists have devised a way to destroy blood stem cells in mice without using chemotherapy or radiotherapy, both of which have toxic side effects.

 
Computers trounce pathologists in predicting lung cancer type, severity
 

Computers trounce pathologists in predicting lung cancer type, severity

Automating the analysis of slides of lung cancer tissue samples increases the accuracy of tumor classification and patient prognoses, according to a new study.

 
One approach can prevent teen obesity, eating disorders, new guidelines say
 

One approach can prevent teen obesity, eating disorders, new guidelines say

New guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics tell pediatricians and parents to avoid focusing on teenagers’ weight and shape to prevent both obesity and eating disorders.

 
Automating genetic analysis helps keep up with rapid discovery of new diseases
 

Automating genetic analysis helps keep up with rapid discovery of new diseases

Stanford researchers are devising ways to have computers help perform some of the intensive genetic analysis now performed manually when scientists study a patient's genome to diagnose a disease.

 
Heart muscle made from stem cells aids precision cardiovascular medicine
 

Heart muscle made from stem cells aids precision cardiovascular medicine

Heart muscle cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells share gene expression patterns with native donor tissue, researchers discovered. These cells can be used to indicate people who should avoid certain medications that could damage their hearts.

 
New issue of Stanford Medicine magazine examines well-being

New issue of Stanford Medicine magazine examines well-being

The summer issue of the magazine delves into the question of how people thrive. It also includes a Q&A with author Laura Hillenbrand, who copes with chronic fatigue syndrome, on how she is leaving frailty behind.

 
5 Questions: Robert Malenka on Ecstasy research

5 Questions: Robert Malenka on Ecstasy research

In a Q&A, the neuroscientist discusses the reasons for continued basic and clinical research on an illegal drug scientists call 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA, and partiers call Ecstasy.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Eddy Albarran, Miriam Goodman, Eric Knudsen and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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