Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
March 28, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 6
Improved 'liquid biopsy' technique enhances detection of tumor DNA in blood

Improved 'liquid biopsy' technique enhances detection of tumor DNA in blood

People with cancer have tumor DNA in their blood. A new way to quiet background “noise” in the blood sample allows researchers to sequence minute quantities of these molecules to improve diagnosis and treatment.

 
 
Hey, Siri, I’m depressed
 

Hey, Siri, I’m depressed

A new study found that telephone conversational agents often failed to provide appropriate information when asked questions about mental health and domestic violence issues.

 
Scientists pinpoint brain circuit for risk preference in rats
 

Scientists pinpoint brain circuit for risk preference in rats

When rats were trained to choose between high- and low-risk options while a circuit in their brains was monitored and manipulated, a specific signal in that circuit determined their choice.

 
Misleading p-values showing up more often in biomedical journal articles
 

Misleading p-values showing up more often in biomedical journal articles

A review of p-values in the biomedical literature from 1990 to 2015 shows that these widely misunderstood statistics are being used increasingly, instead of better metrics of effect size or uncertainty.

 
Study finds benefits of device for inserting IUDs shortly after birth
 

Study finds benefits of device for inserting IUDs shortly after birth

A Stanford researcher helped devise a simple IUD inserter for use in developing countries to help women seeking contraceptive options after delivery.

 
Prenatal steroids reduce risk of brain bleeding in preemies
 

Prenatal steroids reduce risk of brain bleeding in preemies

Steroid treatments intended to mature premature infants’ lungs before birth also protect them against brain hemorrhages after they are born, according to a California-wide study.

 
New technique created for imaging cells and tissues under the skin
 

New technique created for imaging cells and tissues under the skin

A team of scientists has developed the first technique for viewing cells and tissues in three dimensions under the skin. The work could improve diagnosis and treatment for some forms of cancer and blindness.

 
Participants needed for study of bulimia and binge eating disorder
 

Participants needed for study of bulimia and binge eating disorder

Men and women with bulimia and binge eating disorder are being sought for a clinical trial of a new drug combination that may treat the two eating disorders.

 
Medical students rip open Match Day envelopes to reveal their futures

Medical students rip open Match Day envelopes to reveal their futures

After years of preparation, Stanford medical students finally discover where they’ll be for the next phase of their education.

 
5 Questions: Sabine Girod on gender leadership bias in academic medicine

5 Questions: Sabine Girod on gender leadership bias in academic medicine

Sabine Girod led an effort to see if an educational intervention could reduce gender leadership bias among medical school faculty members. In short, it succeeded.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Aida Habtezion, Judith Prochaska, Lei Xing and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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