Neurology & Neurosurgery

  • Using pulses of light to control heart rate, Stanford Medicine researchers investigate a long-standing mystery about how physical states influence emotions.

  • COVID-19 brain fog similar to chemo brain

    Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.

  • Rare mutation protects against Alzheimer's

    Researchers have discovered that a rare mutation inherited with the APOE4 gene variant protects against Alzheimer's, shedding new light on ways to counteract high-risk genes for the disease.

  • Refining law on the definition of death

    Experts propose revising the legal and medical standard on declaring someone dead based on respiratory function and likelihood of consciousness rather than cessation of brain function.

  • Brain plasticity leads to worse seizures

    A brain mechanism needed for learning explains why epileptic seizures become more frequent, but a finding in rodents offers hope for treatment, according to a new study.

  • Teens’ brains tuned to unfamiliar voices

    Around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices, part of the biological signal driving teens to separate from their parents, a Stanford Medicine study has found.

  • Neurobiologist Denis Baylor dies at 82

    Baylor, former chair of the Department of Neurobiology, gained international recognition for discovering the electrical language used by the retina to translate light from the outside world into signals that the brain reads.

  • Hyperexcitable neurons drive sleep instability

    Researchers have identified a mechanism underlying fragmented sleep with older age, paving the way for potential drug therapies.

  • Gene behind ALS hallmark discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers have linked a specific gene known to be associated with ALS with a characteristic of the disease, opening avenues for a targeted therapy.

  • Autism is different in girls’ brains

    Girls with autism differ in several brain centers compared with boys with the disorder, suggesting gender-specific diagnostics are needed, a Stanford study using artificial intelligence found.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Helping autistic job seekers

    Psychiatrist Lawrence Fung expanded his autism research into developing a program that helps those on the spectrum find jobs.


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