list : Cancer

  • Bertozzi research advances medicine

    Bertozzi’s chemistry expertise advances research into cancer immunotherapies, tumor biology and COVID-19.

  • Hodgkin lymphoma pioneer Rosenberg dies

    Rosenberg combined radiation and chemotherapy to treat Hodgkin lymphoma, revolutionizing cancer care. He taught at Stanford Medicine for more than 50 years.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • Small increase in risk with prostate radiation

    Receiving radiation for prostate cancer increases the risk of other cancers very slightly, Stanford Medicine researchers find, allowing providers to better inform patients weighing treatment options.

  • Targeting enzyme that fuels cancer cells

    Stanford Medicine researchers have created a molecule that blocks an enzyme thought to be instrumental in causing colon cancer relapse or chemotherapy resistance.

  • $13 million for cancer research

    The funding, from Cancer Grand Challenges, will help the researchers address difficult problems in cancer prevention, treatment-resistant cancers and therapies for pediatric solid tumors.

  • COVID-19 brain fog similar to chemo brain

    Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.

  • Cancer disparities in Pacific Islanders

    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders experience poorer breast cancer survival outcomes that are hidden when their data is included in Asian populations, Stanford researcher says.

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.