Infectious Disease

  • What to know about monkeypox

    The monkeypox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • Hints into long COVID

    People with lower levels of an antiviral antibody as well as those with lung disease take longer to clear COVID-19 symptoms, say Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.

  • Stanford Medicine provides monkeypox test

    Stanford Medicine now provides a test for the monkeypox virus. Rapid identification of infected people will help combat the virus’s spread and facilitate patient care.

  • COVID vaccine approved for young kids

    Children as young as 6 months can now receive the Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna mRNA vaccines.

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • COVID RNA lingers in feces

    People with mild to moderate COVID-19 can shed viral RNA in their feces months after initial infection, Stanford researchers find. Those who do often have nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

  • Students create low-tech antiviral method

    Using household items, Stanford students have developed a way to make affordable nasal drops with the potential to slow the spread of viruses like COVID-19.

  • Vaccines bolster immunity from prior infection

    Two-dose COVID-19 vaccines significantly increase protection against hospitalization and death in people who had the illness before they were immunized.

  • Test can predict severe dengue

    Researchers have created a test that can predict which dengue patients will likely have mild symptoms and which should be clinically monitored for a high risk of severe illness.

  • The pandemic turns 2

    Stanford Medicine scientists explain what we know, and what we don’t know, about living with COVID-19 two years after the World Health Organization declared a pandemic.


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