2019

  • Bill Marshall dies at 92

    The Stanford Medicine professor was well known as a mentor and teacher, as well as for his expertise in neuroradiology.

  • Digital health's future

    Digital Health 2024 drew more than 200 attendees to hear from dozens of speakers on a range of topics at the intersection of health and digital technology.

  • Augmented reality in the OR

    Stanford Medicine physician uses augmented reality to streamline data visualization during surgery.

  • Gift to help entrepreneurs

    Longtime donor Li Ka-shing also provides support for leading faculty members.

  • Antonio Omuro is new neurology chair

    The former chief of neuro-oncology at the Yale School of Medicine is a highly regarded scientist specializing in the study of brain tumors and an advocate of those underrepresented in medicine.

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Women’s and men’s brain patterns differ

    Stanford Medicine researchers have developed a powerful new artificial intelligence model that can distinguish between male and female brains.

  • Ketamine response may vary by sex

    A new study in rats led by Stanford Medicine researchers looked at whether ketamine’s effects depend on opioid pathways — and uncovered a surprising difference between males and females.

  • Ensuring science integrity

    At a convention on “future proofing” science, participants stressed that institutions can provide training, establish policies and create a culture that rewards rigorous and reproducible studies.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care