News & Research

  • Ensuring science integrity

    At a convention on “future proofing” science, participants stressed that institutions can provide training, establish policies and create a culture that rewards rigorous and reproducible studies.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.

  • DNA shows Roman Empire migration

    The team led by Stanford Medicine analyzed thousands of genomes, including those newly sequenced from 204 skeletons, to gain insight into how and where people moved during the Roman Empire.

  • Telomeres lengthen with weight management

    Children with obesity in a six-month healthy eating and exercise program experienced increases in their average telomere length, suggesting reversal of premature aging, a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers found.

  • Inaugural Health Equity Symposium

    At the 2024 Health Equity Symposium, speakers emphasized that racism is alive and well, and workshop attendees identified ways to tackle health disparities.

  • AI helps manage Type 2 diabetes

    A new study led by Stanford Medicine indicates that an AI app can help Type 2 diabetic patients manage their blood glucose levels.

  • Screening, treatment halve breast cancer deaths

    Treatment of metastatic disease is responsible for nearly one-third of the decrease in annual deaths from breast cancer from 1975 to 2019, according to a Stanford Medicine-led study.

  • Autopsy, morgue and decedent care

    Stanford Hospital brings together two autopsy rooms, the morgue and decedent care team offices. The new space allows for more advanced research and includes bereavement and viewing rooms for families.

  • Psychiatrist Craig Barr Taylor dies at 78

    Taylor, a Stanford Medicine professor emeritus, took a public health approach to mental health and was an early proponent of digital interventions for anxiety and eating disorders.

  • Drug treats vets’ PTSD and depression

    Stanford Medicine researchers find that ibogaine, a plant-based psychoactive compound, safely led to improvements in depression, anxiety and functioning among veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

  • Brain stimulation can improve hypnotizability

    Stanford Medicine scientists used transcranial magnetic stimulation to temporarily enhance hypnotizability in patients with chronic pain, making them better candidates for hypnotherapy.

  • 2023’s top scientific advancements

    Reflecting on the past year, the editors and writers of the Office of Communications picked some of the most significant scientific achievements they covered at Stanford Medicine in 2023.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care


Other Stanford
Medicine News

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

January 4, 2024 – Stanford Report

Faculty symposium supports a more equitable professoriate

The Next Generation Symposium uses more than its namesake event to improve representation among STEM faculty. The effort also promotes and supports early-career scientists through mentorship, community, and a reimagining of the faculty search process.

November 2, 2023 – School of Humanities and Sciences

Stanford introduces medical humanities minor

Combining the field of medicine with art, literature, film, history, policy, and the social sciences, a team of Stanford professors has shaped a new undergradua

October 31, 2023 – Global Health

Announcing a new global health scholars program for African Physicians

The Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health launched a new Stanford Global Health African Scholars Program on Nov. 1 to promote health equity, capacity-strengthening, and unique focused learning between African medical institutions and Stanford.

October 17, 2023 – Global Health

Perspective: It's time to prepare for the potential return of yellow fever

Mosquito-transmitted virus infections are on the rise and their spread is accelerating in Texas, Florida and elsewhere in the American South.

October 9, 2023 – Radiology

New Photon Counting CT (PCCT) Prototype Installed

A new prototype GE HealthCare photon counting CT (PCCT) scanner has been installed at 3155 Porter Drive, only the second such scanner in the United States.

  • – Stanford News

    Moonshot effort aims to bioprint a human heart and implant it in a pig

    Advances in the 3D printing of living tissue – a field known as bioprinting – puts within reach the possibility of fabricating whole organs from scratch and implanting them in living beings. A multidisciplinary team from Stanford received a federal contract to do just that.

  • – Global Health

    Celebrating Women Leaders in Climate and Health

    In recognition of Women in Medicine Month this September, Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health is celebrating female leaders working at the intersection of climate change and medicine.


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