Our Team

Dr. Rabinovitch is proud to lead a team of talented individuals working together to advance cardiopulmonary research.

Lingli Wang, MD
Basic Life Research Scientist
Lab Manager

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Dr. Lingli Wang joined Dr. Rabinovitch’s group in July 2003 as lab manager, bringing over 10 years of experience in life science research to the group. Dr. Wang manages the transgenic mouse lines produced and used in the different research projects. With Dr. Cao, she trains new postdoctoral fellows and laboratory staff, and manages the day to day operations of the lab. In addition to managing the lab, Dr. Wang also investigates the cardiovascular phenotype in mice with tissue specific deletion of BMPRII. She found that loss of Bmpr2 in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) causes congenital heart diseases in mice. The penetrance is about 50%, and the survivors developed pulmonary hypertension (PH) in a mouse model of reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia. She found that loss of Bmpr2 in PASMC leads to reduced contractility and heightened proliferation, caused by elevated SMAD2/3 and ARRB2 and consequent increase in pAKT mediated activation of β-Catenin and reduction in RHOA/RAC1.

Dr. Wang received her MD degree from the Fourth Army Medical University in Xi'an, China. She completed her postdoctoral studies at Stanford's Dept. of Pediatrics in 1997, where she investigated the mechanism of interferon resistance in rotavirus. Prior to Stanford, she worked at the University of Southern California, School of Medicine.  Following her postdoctoral studies, Dr. Wang worked in Stanford's Dept. of Pediatrics Hematology and Oncology Division, investigating multi-drug resistance, and found a novel inhibitor of apoptosis, ARMER; and in the Dept. of Pathology, where she investigated markers for human kidney tumors using cDNA and tissue microarrays and computer-assisted data analysis.

 


Lingli's project

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Brenda Arroyo Rodriguez 
Assistant Clinical Research Coordinator/Lab Researcher
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

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Brenda Arroyo Rodriguez joined the Rabinovitch lab in June 2021. She is a Clinical Research Coordinator for Dr. Zamanian at the Stanford Adult Pulmonary Hypertension Program, and a Lab Researcher supporting genotyping transgenic mice efforts with Dr. Lingli Wang in the Rabinovitch Lab.  She also coordinates consent and harvest of blood for research studies related to the characterization of monocytes and dendritic cells in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Brenda earned a BS in Public Health from San Jose State University and an AS in Human Development Studies from Ohlone College. Prior to working with the Rabinovitch Lab, Brenda worked at the Stanford Biobank as a Biospecimen Assistant and focused on clinical specimen client requests. As an undergraduate, Brenda worked as a Student Lab Assistant for the California State Genetic Disease Department.

 

 

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Katherine Guo, PhD
Computational Biologist, Genetics

(A collaboration with the Engreitz Laboratory)

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Katherine is interested in applying statistical and deep learning methods to genetic data to study enhancers and noncoding DNA as well as their effects on human disease. Before joining the Engreitz lab, she obtained a BS in Computer Science at Caltech and worked for three years as a software engineer and data scientist at IBM Research.  Her work in the Rabinovitch lab focuses on establishing bioinformatic approaches to integrate large datasets related to the flow based vascular remodeling.

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Aiqin Cao, PhD
Life Science Research Professional 3

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Dr. Cao joined the Rabinovitch Laboratory in April 2011, where she manages day to day operations in the lab with Dr. Lingli Wang, supervises new fellows and performs key experiments to finalize projects for publication.  In addition to these duties, Dr. Cao investigates the mechanism of arterial and venous dysfunction in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) obtained from both healthy individuals and from HLHS patients.

Dr. Aiqin Cao received her PhD degree in Biology from Purdue University. Her graduate research in the laboratory of Dr. K.G. Raghothama focused on the molecular mechanism of plant response to phosphate (Pi) stress. Dr. Cao showed that Phosphate differentially regulates 14-3-3 family members, and GRF9 plays a role in Pi-starvation induced responses in Arabidopsis thaliana, and that a protein phosphatase gene family from tomato (LePS2;1) and from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPS2) are induced during phosphate starvation. The studies shed a light on the adaptive response of plants to Pi deficiency that could be altered in a genetically modified plant to allow it to adapt to natural Pi stress.  For her postdoctoral studies, Dr. Cao joined Stanford’s Division of Endocrinology investigating the molecular mechanism of human oncostatin M (OM) mediated signal transductions in lipid metabolism. She identified long chain acyl-CoA synthetase-3 (ACSL3) as a molecular target for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta, and, in a second project, demonstrated that the suppression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) expression by OM as a mechanism that increases LDLR protein in liver cells.

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Patricia A. del Rosario,  BSN, RN, PHN
Clinical Research Coordinator

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Patricia Del Rosario joined the Rabinovitch lab in May 2009. is the clinical research coordinator for the Stanford Transplant Tissue Bank, formerly part of the Pulmonary Hypertension Breakthrough Initiative (PHBI) led by Drs. Zamanian and Rabinovitch, and a research nurse for PH clinical trial studies at Stanford’s Adult PH Program. With Dr. Roof, Ms. del Rosario played a key role in the coordination and oversight of the Phase 1 clinical trial “Safety and Tolerability of Escalating Doses of Subcutaneous Elafin (Tiprelestat) Injection in Healthy Normal Subjects”, including the development of the study protocol, eCRFs, sample collection kits, obtaining and maintaining regulatory approvals.

Patricia earned a BS in Biochemistry from San Francisco State University and a BS in Nursing from Dominican University of California. Prior to working at Stanford, she worked at Exelixis, Inc. as a research associate in combinatorial chemistry and, after pursuing her nursing education, in Marin General Hospital as a labor and delivery/NICU nurse.

 

 

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