News Mentions - Archive

  • Muslim Network TV

    Suicide crisis in Muslim communities

    Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this news segment and provides an overview of the public health crisis and the related work of the Muslim Mental Health and Islamic Psychology Lab.

  • BuzzFeed News

    Jail Time For An “Imaginary Crime”: It’s Almost Impossible To Overdose Just By Touching Fentanyl, But People Are Being Locked Up For It Anyway

    The prevalence of accidental overdose has increased along with the amount of fentanyl in the illicit drug supply in the United States, and along with it, serious legal implications. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • PR Newswire

    Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Importance of Later School Start Times for Adolescent Health

    The latest article published in the National Sleep Foundation's (NSF) Sleep Health Journal highlights the importance of later school start times for adolescents. The article, co-authored by Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, highlights key outcomes from the Summit on Adolescent Sleep and School Start Times held in January 2021 and hosted by Stanford University School of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. National Sleep Foundation supported the Summit, along with other sleep organizations and universities.

  • USA TODAY

    Muslims face a suicide crisis in America. The taboo of talking about it must end.

    Muslim communities seem to be waking up to the reality of mental illness and the acute need to address it. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, coauthors this opinion piece on USA Today.

  • Psychiatric News

    New Stanford Protocol for TMS Found to Achieve Fast Remission

    A TMS protocol that can be done in five days has shown remarkable efficacy in people with treatment-resistant depression and may be particularly valuable in inpatient settings with limited bed space. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides an overview in this article.

  • NBC Bay Area

    All the Rage: New San Francisco ‘Smash Room' is a Break From Holiday Stress

    It’s a smash hit with stressed-out shoppers, who say they love it to pieces: a basement business where they can take refuge from the mall and unleash their aggression on old furniture, electronics and dishes. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Sydney Morning Herald

    The wellbeing articles that changed us in 2021

    Of the hundreds of health and wellness articles we have published this year, these are the ones that hit home more than others: from the myth of 10,000 steps to the benefits of reduced drinking. The author mentions an article about our collective addiction to dopamine where Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Mass News

    Synthetic Alcohol Promises to Make Drinking Safer. But Experts Are Wary

    Imagine if you could have the buzz from a drink but not the negative side effects. That’s the marketing hype bubbling up from startups around the world making beverages that promise to make you feel tipsy using the magic of plant extracts, not alcohol. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NBC Bay Area

    Tips on Handling the Holiday Blues

    As the holiday juggernaut barrels along, it’s not unusual to start feeling stressed or even depressed on the days that are supposed to be the happiest of the year. Such feelings are nothing to be ashamed of, according to health professionals. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Mind Body Green

    Most Jet Lag Advice Doesn't Work: Here's Why + What To Do On Your Next Flight

    Nothing derails a trip like jet lag—especially if you have limited time in your destination or need to be on your game upon landing. So is there any way we can skip over the travel woe? Yes and no. According to circadian rhythm specialists, jet lag is more nuanced than we give it credit for. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Presentation: Improvement of Narcolepsy Symptoms with Once-Nightly Sodium Oxybate

    Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the results of a phase 3 clinical trial that examined once-nightly sodium oxybate in patients with narcolepsy.

  • Justice Rapid Response

    ASP event: ICC Prosecutor commits to put policy into action on justice for children

    Prosecutor Karim Asad Ahmad Khan QC reaffirmed his commitment to making access to justice for children – through concrete actions – a high priority of his mandate at the International Criminal Court (ICC), during the recent event ‘Moving forward: Enabling a child-centred approach at the ICC and beyond’ held by Justice Rapid Response and Save the Children. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted from the event in this article.

  • CryptoNews

    Learn to Control Your Own Mind or Get Lost in the Metaverse

    In this episode, Jay Martin of Cambridge House interviews Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. Listen to the recording as they discuss the growing problem of addiction in the modern world, how to navigate overabundance, and how the metaverse will be 'reality' for many.

  • Seeker Baby

    Why Can’t I Get My Baby to Sleep Like a Baby?

    Wondering how to help your baby stop crying and start sleeping? Come find out alongside Angel Laketa Moore as she speaks with Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about why healthy sleep habits are so important to cultivate early on.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Designing psychiatric care to precisely match patients' biology

    Using a new approach that harnesses the power of precision, Stanford Medicine researchers are devising new ways to treat depression. Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this post.

  • CBS Local San Francisco

    Residents Skeptical of San Francisco Mayor's Pledge to Get Drugs, Crime Out of Tenderloin

    By now, most San Franciscans have probably heard Mayor London Breed's pledge to crack down on crime in the city. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • KCBS

    Parent Praise Is Key For Making Life Lessons Stick

    A new study looked at the importance of parent praise when it comes to kids learning how--and how long--to brush their teeth. That research could offer insights on how kids learn to persist when it comes to other more difficult tasks. For more, KCBS Radio news anchor Rebecca Corral spoke with David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • KQED

    'It Saved My Life': Depression Treatment Is Turning Lives Around in Five Days

    A new type of brain stimulation is being used to treat people with depression, with promising results: In five days or fewer, almost 80% of patients were symptom-free. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Brain Stimulation Lab are featured in this article.

  • AARP

    Products to Help Combat Seasonal Affective Disorder​

    Lack of light can negatively impact those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder. Products like sunrise alarm clocks and daylight bulbs can help.​ Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.

  • PBS NewsHour

    Do safe drug consumption sites save lives? Here's what we know about NYC's new venture

    Since last spring, more than 100,000 Americans have died of drug overdoses — many caused by the opioid, fentanyl. Officials are searching for solutions to try to save lives, including setting up authorized centers where people can use illegal drugs under supervision. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this coverage.

  • NPR

    You don't have to drink to celebrate the holiday season

    If you think alcohol is problematic for you, or want to avoid drinking too much, or just aren't the biggest drinker, here are some strategies for navigating end-of-year celebrations. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Good Housekeeping

    Find Out If You’re Affected By "Revenge Bedtime Procrastination" and How to Stop It

    Are you sabotaging your own sleep routine in order to get back more person time? If so, it could be harmful to your overall health. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this piece.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    'It's endangering all of us': Experts link reckless driving to pandemic as car crash deaths surge

    Driving under the influence, speeding and driving without a seatbelt are examples of reckless behavior that safety experts have linked to the pandemic. They believe those actions have led to a surge in car crash fatalities. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Earth.com

    Young children appreciate humor in the same brain region as adults

    Humor is a universal human feature that relies on a cognitive process allowing us to perceive things as funny, and then to laugh about them. A recent publication co-authored by Naama Mayseles, postdoctoral fellow, and Allan Reiss, Howard C. Robbins professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is featured in this article.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    'An emergency': Surgeon General raises alarm, issues rare advisory over youth mental health

    The country's top physician is putting focus on the mental health of young people, especially during the on-going pandemic -- too many children are struggling, as seen in a rise in suicide rates and much more- the reason behind a rare public advisory on youth mental health. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing are featured.

  • KQED

    Half Moon Bay's 'Big Wave' Community Welcomes Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities | KQED

    For parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the need to have solid plans in place for their children's care runs deep. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and his work with the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, are featured in this article.

  • Washington Post

    Instagram is touting safety features for teens. Mental health advocates aren’t buying it.

    The changes come one day before its CEO testifies before Congress about the app’s impact on young people. Vicki Harrison, program director for the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing at Stanford University, talk about “doom scroll” and how Instagram’s new features may help address some of these concerns.

  • US News and World Report

    How Yoga and Exercise Help With Addiction Recovery

    Certain types of yoga can produce a natural "high" that can help those recovering from addiction. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Recognizing and Addressing Psychiatric Implications of Sleep Disorders

    Sleep disturbance often co-occurs among older adults with psychiatric symptoms and disorders. A thorough assessment, looking at difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep, daytime sleepiness/dysfunction, and other physical markers (eg, snoring), will help providers identify the presence of sleep disorders, such as OSA or chronic insomnia, that co-occur with psychiatric conditions. Treatment with evidenced-based methods is essential to improving their symptoms, quality of life, and brain health. Drs Juang, Mills-Finnerty, Cassidy-Eagle, Kawai, and Gould coauthor this article in Psychiatric Times' Special Report: Geriatric Psychiatry.

  • Psychiatric News

    A Psychiatrist’s Journey Through Community Suicide Contagion: How Media Can Make A Difference

    Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes, “For psychiatrists, it is a critical professional responsibility to educate our media partners about the risk of suicide contagion and encourage journalists to follow the reporting recommendations to help save lives.”

  • Washington Post

    Your brain on wine, milkshakes and kale juice

    Our brains can build up a tolerance to certain foods. In particular, if we eat a lot of foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt, like processed foods, our brains don't experience as much pleasure when we eat them. This makes us more likely to overeat things that aren't good for us. Food and mental health reporter Mary Beth Albright joined Eric Stice, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, to explore the subject.

  • Healio

    APA calls for action to address high number of overdose deaths

    In light of recent CDC data showing more than 100,000 U.S. deaths from overdoses between April 2020 and April 2021, the American Psychiatric Association reviewed effective substance abuse treatments and called for efforts to intervene. These data continue to highlight the alarming trend of increasing overdose deaths in the U.S. Smita Das, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chair of APA’s Council on Addiction Psychiatry, provides comment.

  • The Scientist Magazine

    DNA Damage Makes Zebrafish Sleepy

    Buildup of a DNA-repair protein in brain cells spurs shut-eye in the fish, a study finds, and similar results in mice suggest the mechanism is widespread in animals. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Science

    Next generation of deep brain stimulation aims to tackle depression

    For patients whose depression resists treatment with drugs and electroconvulsive therapy, surgically implanted wires that stimulate the brain might bring relief. But in recent years, two randomized, controlled trials of this approach, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), were halted after underwhelming results in interim analyses. Long-term follow-up of participants, however, has revived some optimism. Mahendra Bhati, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurosurgery, is quoted.

  • One Mind

    Brain Waves: Medicinal Psychedelics with Brandon Staglin and Dr. Robert Malenka

    Psychedelic interventions make up one of the fastest growing areas of medical research — but how effective are they for treating a variety of mental health conditions? In this Brain Waves™ episode, Host and One Mind President Brandon Staglin sits down with Robert Malenka, Pritzker Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Deputy Director of the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute at Stanford University, to discuss the science behind medicinal psychedelics.

  • Medscape

    Intranasal Oxytocin for Autism Promising ― Then Came the Data

    The off-label use of intranasal oxytocin to improve social functioning in children with autism has become widespread. Now, the largest trial to date finds this off-label treatment doesn’t work. What’s next? Karen Parker, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • NPR.org

    Americans can wait many weeks to see a therapist. California law aims to fix that.

    Many Americans with mental illness report waiting weeks for care, even for serious depression or suicidality. Now California has a new law for insurers, limiting those wait times to two weeks or less. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Brain’s sensory switchboard has complex connections to autism

    An atypical thalamus may underlie not only sensory issues in autism but also difficulties with social skills, attention and memory. Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • KPIX CBS News Bay Area

    Opioid Overdose Deaths Soar Nationwide

    While San Francisco's overdose deaths are on pace to decline this year, the opioid crisis continues to rage across the country, with overdose deaths up 20%. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this news feature.

  • ABC News

    Astroworld concertgoer who tried to stop performance recounts traumatic event

    Astroworld concertgoers may experience trauma and need emotional healing following the concert chaos. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this article.

  • Teen Vogue

    Social Media Isn't Just Addictive — It's Addictive By Design

    We’ve seen studies for years telling us that social media can be bad for our mental health, but more than likely, we didn’t really need research to know that. Many of us have experienced the mental drain that comes with scrolling endlessly through social media — and worse, feeling like we can’t stop even when it’s noticeably bringing us down. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Business Wire

    $3 Million Federal Grant to Study Groundbreaking Treatment for PTSD

    Talkspace announced a $3 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the effectiveness of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) – a well-established treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – in a virtual setting. As millions of Americans – including veterans, sexual assault survivors, and others – continue to battle PTSD and other trauma related challenges, this research seeks to explore and unlock the potential of delivering CPT through digital channels, with the goal of dramatically expanding access to care for those most in need. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral services, will co-lead the study in conjunction with Talkspace and a colleague at UT Health San Antonio.

  • APA Publishing

    Psychiatry Unbound Podcast: Neurodiversity

    Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses his new book "Neurodiversity: From Phenomenology to Neurobiology and Enhancing Technologies" with Laura Roberts, professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, to explore this fascinating new area. Because the field is in its infancy, there are few authoritative resources for clinicians and educators who wish to understand their neurodiverse patients and students. Dr. Fung and Dr. Roberts provide real-life examples of Neurodiversity in our world.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    Here's why people with depression and mood disorders now qualify for COVID booster shots

    Millions of people who experience mental illnesses such as depression and schizophrenia are now eligible for COVID booster shots. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added mood disorders to the eligibility criteria in October, a step seen by experts as an important addition that recognizes the linkage between mental and physical health, a connection too often overlooked by the public. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Yahoo News/USA Today

    Going to a concert shouldn't be scary. What to do when it is.

    After Astroworld, going to a concert might be too overwhelmingly scary even for the most enthusiastic fans. Here's how to cope. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    U.S. overdose deaths are soaring. Biden’s new plan could help ease the crisis.

    Secretary of Health and Human Services Xavier Becerra has rolled out a four-part plan that includes measures to prevent drug addiction by cracking down on inappropriate prescribing of opioids and to curb drug overdoses by emphasizing harm reduction techniques. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Psychiatric Times - APA

    Nurturing Cultural Humility in Mental Health Care

    How can cultural humility in therapeutic settings improve patient outcomes? Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, presented on the topic with colleague, Dr. Napoleon Higgins, at the 2021 Neuroscience Education Institute Congress. In the presentation, Higgins and Hu discussed the impact of history on current mental health care outcomes; the effects of racism on mental health; the ways oppression, racism, access barriers, and other sociocultural factors lead to health disparities and mental health sequelae; and the importance of cultural humility in mental health care settings.

  • National Center for Youth Law

    Guidance for mental health professionals serving unaccompanied children released from government custody

    This new downloadable guidance is intended to support mental health providers in effectively serving unaccompanied children released from federal immigration custody. Developed by children’s rights attorneys and mental health experts on trauma and immigration from the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, the National Center for Youth Law, and the Center for Trauma Recovery & Juvenile Justice, this Guide provides context on the distinctive experiences unaccompanied children carry with them and offers guidance on how to meet the therapeutic needs of these children.

  • Washington Post

    4 ways that older people can bolster or improve their mental health

    Resilience among older people has been attributed to their ability to better regulate emotions, higher acceptance of the ups and downs of life, and wisdom that comes from having learned to see the big picture. But old age brings many challenges that can harm mental health. Irvin Yalom, emeritus professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CBS News

    SAINT: Hope for new treatment of depression

    A new experimental treatment using a fast-acting approach with targeted magnetic stimulation of the brain, called Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy, has achieved significant success in trials. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this piece about the study.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Stanford program matches neurodiverse job seekers with employers

    Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article about the Stanford Neurodiversity at Work program, a research project based on the philosophy that neurodiverse individuals, such as those with autism or ADHD, have brain differences that are normal, rather than deficits — and can be advantageous in the workplace.

  • The New York Times

    The Ketamine Cure

    The once-taboo drug has been repurposed to treat depression and is even available for delivery. But how safe is it? Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Washington Post

    How to choose the best sleeping position, and why it matters

    While the position you fall asleep in is just one piece of the sleep hygiene puzzle, experts said it can be key to getting quality rest. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • CNN

    Why people keep scrolling when they say they are done with Facebook

    The tides are turning against Facebook. But no matter how much they may want to, some people just can't seem to break away. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Reviewed

    Everything you need to know about sleep and daylight saving

    Falling forward and springing back are the bane of some people's existence. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed on the subject in this article.

  • Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

    Karl Deisseroth: Lighting up The Brain

    With the invention of new ways to explore the brain, Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has revolutionized neuroscience. Deisseroth is interviewed about his work in this podcast episode with Alan Alda.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Addictive potential of social media, explained

    The curious title of the book, "Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence," pays tribute to the crucial and often destructive role that dopamine plays in modern society. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, the book's author, is featured in this Q&A.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Depression treatment devised at Stanford is nearly 80% effective in controlled study

    In a double-blind controlled study, high doses of magnetic brain stimulation, given on an accelerated timeline and individually targeted, caused remission in 79% of trial participants with severe depression. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Alan Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted about the study in this article.

  • Science

    ‘If it’s alive, it sleeps.’ Brainless creatures shed light on why we slumber

    Evidence from evolutionarily ancient creatures is revealing that sleep is not just for the brain. This article includes a feature about Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who is developing a way to watch the organ feedback process play out cell by cell in the thumbnail-size, transparent fish Danionella translucida.

  • Psychiatric News | APA

    New TMS Protocol Turns Six Weeks of Treatment Into One

    Intermittent theta-burst stimulation, recently approved by the FDA for treatment-resistant depression, has significantly shortened the duration of repetitive TMS treatment sessions from 30 minutes to three minutes. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted about the study in this article.

  • APA Services, Inc.

    Psychological scientists rally for psychological research on Capitol Hill

    Thirteen psychologists joined more than 450 advocates urging Congress to provide robust, predictable, and sustained funding for NIH in fiscal year 2022. Victoria Cosgrove, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, attended the annual Rally for Medical Research Hill Day.

  • SELF

    Here's What It Really Means to Be Diagnosed With Bipolar Disorder

    Receiving or pursuing a bipolar disorder diagnosis is a brave step. Understanding what you may be experiencing is the first step to finding the support you need to feel like yourself again. The first thing to know: You’re not alone. An estimated 4.4% of American adults experience bipolar disorder at some point in their lives, according to the National Institute of Health. Po Wang, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    HHS pledges more effort, resources toward harm reduction for drug users

    With overdose deaths soaring toward 100,000 annually, Secretary Xavier Becerra outlined government policy to keep drug users alive and healthy until they are ready to seek treatment. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Cancer Therapy Advisor

    PTSD in Cancer Patients: What Providers Need to Know

    Experts outline risk factors for PTSD and explain how PTSD can affect cancer outcomes. Sheila Lahijani, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • WSJ

    People Are Using Marijuana to Treat Anxiety and Depression, but the Science Is Murky

    The science on cannabis as a mental-health treatment for anxiety and depression is in its infancy, psychologists and researchers say—and some evidence suggests that marijuana can make these problems worse. Smita Das, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Psychiatric News | APA

    Building Resilience in Our Children for the Aftereffects of COVID-19

    Children and adolescents have the capacity to become resilient and adaptive when we give them the opportunities and resources to do so, but half to two-thirds of those needing mental health services may not have access to them. Victor Carrion, vice chair and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • International Society of Psychiatric Genetics

    Congratulations 2021 Honorific Award Winners

    Sergiu Pasca has been awarded the 2021 Theodore Reich Young Investigator Award by the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics. Congratulations, Dr. Pasca!

  • Fortune

    Employers are still in the early stages of addressing worker mental health

    The best way to address the mental health challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic is to have already been working hard to support employees before the pandemic. That was one of the big takeaways from the recent "Rethinking Mental Health and Well-being" panel hosted by Fortune. Mira Zein, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Psychiatric News Alert, APA

    TMS May Help Reduce Symptoms of Depression, PTSD in Veterans

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive procedure that uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain, may help relieve symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. This article features a study recently published by several faculty members in the department and their colleagues.

  • The Independent

    How does depression and anxiety affect the body?

    Undue anxiety or depression can foster the development of a serious physical disease, and even impede the ability to withstand or recover from one. The potential consequences are particularly timely, as the ongoing stress and disruptions of the pandemic continue to take a toll on mental health. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Glamour

    Internet Privacy—Or Lack Thereof—Is Quietly Affecting Your Mental Health

    The insidious trickle of tech tracking into every aspect of our lives can be toxic in ways we aren't even conscious of. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford deepens support for local students’ mental health

    For decades, Stanford has engaged in school and community collaborations that support positive youth development, including efforts focusing on mental health and well-being. This article highlights the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing and many other related initiatives.

  • Bloomberg

    Robinhood Wannabes Dare Regulators With Embrace of Games and Prizes

    Among the many complaints about Robinhood Markets Inc. in the pandemic era, one attack seemed to stick: the brokerage app was making trading too easy and too fun. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on addictive trading behaviors.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Youngsters with ADHD often don't receive best treatment

    Families of young kids with ADHD should get parenting-skills therapy before other treatments, but this happens infrequently, a study found. The Stanford Parenting Center in the department is mentioned in this article for their Positive Parenting consultation groups.

  • Psychiatric News

    Stanford Initiative Engages Media About Mental Health, Suicide

    In this article, Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Media and Mental Health Initiative are featured. MMHI has the potential to improve media narratives around mental health and head off harmful storytelling. A notable concern is media coverage of suicides, which can raise or lower the risk of subsequent suicides in communities.

  • Fox News

    'Addiction is the modern plague', which will be lasting

    In this segment, Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses addiction as a contemporary "plague", and that it will likely be an affliction that will affect the human race for the foreseeable future.

  • Stanford Medcast Episode 25: Hot Topics Mini

    Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: The Importance of Psychosocial Oncology

    This episode addresses psychosocial oncology, a growing cancer subspecialty that addresses the variety of psychological, behavioral, emotional and social issues that may arise for cancer patients. Sheila Lahijani, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this episode.

  • Stanford Medicine - 90 seconds with Lisa Kim

    How to help kids sleep better

    Is your child having trouble sleeping? According to a Stanford Medicine study, children who learned techniques such as deep breathing and yoga slept longer and better, even though the curriculum didn’t instruct them in improving sleep. Lisa Kim interviews Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner Professor and Vice-Chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, in this 90 second feature.

  • Moms

    How To Help A Child Suffering From Academic Anxiety After A Year Of Online Learning

    We can't change the fact that our kids are going back into the classroom, but we can help them navigate their anxiety so they can enjoy school again. Elizabeth Reichert, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Vox

    A better way to legalize marijuana

    So far, 18 states have commercial legalization, and there are fights in a handful more states as well as in Washington, DC, to enact the model there. Some experts and advocates don’t love this model. There are genuine concerns that the current commercial model of legalization will lead to “Big Marijuana”: a large industry that, similar to the tobacco, alcohol, and opioid industries, has a powerful financial incentive to market and sell its product to as many people as possible, no matter the consequences for consumers or the public more broadly. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Stanford Report

    Faculty Senate chair stresses importance of faculty voice

    The 54th Faculty Senate discussed civil discourse, voted to extend legislation allowing its Steering Committee to convene to make decisions on behalf of the full senate in administrative session during the COVID-19 crisis and heard from the Associated Students of Stanford University during its first meeting of the academic year on Oct. 7. Ruth O’Hara, senior associate dean for research in the School of Medicine, director of Spectrum, and the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Facebook Comes Under Fire After Whistleblower and Leaked Documents Reveal Negative Impact on Young Girls

    The media giant’s own research highlights potential harmful effects of their apps on eating disorders, self-esteem, and mental health. Sarah Adler, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • CNN

    Facebook went offline this week. Experts say we should log out, too

    The world experienced a forced break from Facebook's social networking tools on Monday, and many people felt liberated from their devices. Experts say we should liberate ourselves and do it more often. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute News

    Serotonin stabilizes social memories

    New research in mice has shown how targeted stimulation of the brain’s serotonin system could improve memory for new acquaintances, even after a brief introduction. Robert Malenka, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Xiaoting Wu, postdoctoral researcher, are featured in this article.

  • Washington Post

    Banning your children from Instagram won’t help keep them safe. These tips will.

    Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen testified about the risks of social media for kids. If you're a parent worried about your children, here are some things you can do. Vicki Harrison, program director for the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing and the GoodforMEdia project, provides comment.

  • KQED

    California Bill Would Reduce Wait Times for Mental Health Appointments

    Senate Bill 221, which passed both houses of the Legislature with a near unanimous vote, would require health insurers across the state to reduce wait times for mental health appointments to no more than 10 business days. The bill is currently on the governor's desk. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • San Francisco CBS

    Facebook Testimony Waking Some to Hazards of Social Media For Kids

    During testimony on Capitol Hill, Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen claimed the company chooses to let content on its platform that is "disastrous" for society, and can be especially harmful to children. Sarah Adler, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NY Times

    Teenage girls say Instagram’s mental health impacts are no surprise.

    Among young people, the idea that Instagram can hurt someone’s self-image is widely discussed. Vicki Harrison, program director for the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing and the GoodforMEdia project, provides comment.

  • NY Times

    The Devastating Ways Depression and Anxiety Impact the Body

    It’s no surprise that when a person gets a diagnosis of heart disease, cancer or some other life-limiting or life-threatening physical ailment, they become anxious of depressed. But the reverse can also be true: Undue anxiety or depression can foster the development of a serious physical disease, and even impede the ability to withstand or recover from one. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this article.

  • Business Insider

    Claims of anti-vax nurses fueling hospital staff shortages ignore the limited support and lack of mental healthcare for COVID's frontline workers

    Poor work environments and burnout are putting pressure on already strained nurses — and without better resources, trauma and fatigue will cause a nurse staffing crisis, experts told Insider. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Stanford neuroscientist's 'assembloids' pave the way for innovative brain research

    A recent article in the journal Nature credits Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, with blazing a trail toward a more profound understanding of early brain development, and of what can go wrong in the process, using a cell-based research innovation he named "assembloids."

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    New Bay Area clinics provide mental health care, other services to youths

    This article features the allcove centers, standalone health and wellness sites for youth ages 12 to 25, often on a walk-in basis, at minimal or no cost. Although allcove is built to support a wide range of physical, emotional, and social needs, its overarching goal is to deal with mental health challenges before they develop into deeper problems. allcove is yet in its infancy, with two sites just opened in the Bay Area and five more in the pipeline around California. It’s modeled on a 15-year-old program in Australia, headspace, which has 130 such clinics. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing are featured in this article.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Atlas maps gene activity, accessibility in developing brain

    A new resource profiles gene expression and the accessibility of DNA in single cells across the developing human cerebral cortex and may help scientists decipher the effects of noncoding mutations linked to autism. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KPIX | CBS SF Bay Area

    DEA Issues Safety Alert As San Francisco Fentanyl Seizures Soar

    With federal fentanyl seizures soaring over 155% so far this year in San Francisco, the Drug Enforcement Administration Monday issued a health warning over the lethal toll overdoses are taking in the Bay Area and across the country. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • UIC Today

    New finding offers promise in researching depression together with obesity

    Is problem-solving therapy effective in treating individuals who have both depression and obesity? Researchers have identified an important step toward discovering how and why therapies and treatments work. Research published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has shown that problem-solving therapy led to short-term changes in the amygdala — the gateway to emotion regulation in the brain. Co-investigators of the study at Stanford are mentioned in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Karl Deisseroth shares Lasker Award for research on microbial molecules behind optogenetics

    Discoveries by Karl Deisseroth and his two co-recipients regarding microbial light-activated molecules led to his development of a way to manipulate selected neurons in living animals to observe changes in their behavior. Deisseroth, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of bioengineering, has been named a co-recipient of this year’s Lasker Basic Medical Research Award. Congratulations!

  • Rasmei Kampuchea Daily

    Collaboration between Stanford University and DC-Cam on health projects

    The Human Rights and Mental Health Program at Stanford has partnered with the Documentation Center of Cambodia as a consultant in the project to promote the rights and improve the health status of regime survivors The Khmer Rouge. Program members Jessie Bruner, Beth van Schaack, and Daryn Reicherter are featured in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Insulin resistance doubles risk of major depressive disorder, Stanford study finds

    Stanford Medicine scientists have linked insulin resistance to an increased risk of developing major depressive disorder. Natalie Rasgon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Katie Watson, postdoctoral scholar, are quoted about the study in this article.

  • NY Times

    Worried About Your Teen on Social Media? Here’s How to Help.

    For kids, developing a healthier relationship with Instagram and other platforms can be tricky. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the topic in this article.

  • Psychiatric News Alert from the APA

    Insulin Resistance Linked to Major Depressive Disorder, Dutch Study Finds

    Insulin resistance predicted the development of major depressive disorder in adults over the course of nine years, according to a recently published study. Natalie Rasgon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Katie Watson, postdoctoral scholar, are quoted about the study in this article.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    A Q&A with Daniel Mason: Combining psychiatry and writing

    Daniel Mason, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, speaks on his passion for literature and medicine in this Stanford Medicine post.

  • IBRO

    IBRO-Kemali Prize Awarded to Dr. Sergiu P. Pasca

    The IBRO Dargut and Milena Kemali Foundation announced that Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has been awarded the 2022 IBRO-Dargut and Milena Kemali International Prize for Research in the field of Basic and Clinical Neurosciences “in recognition of his innovative research work using stem cell technology to create human brain organoids and assembloids, and their application to realistic studies of cellular mechanisms of human brain development and disease mechanisms.” Congratulations, Dr. Pasca!

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Q&A: Shining a light on Muslim mental health in America

    According to a new study from Stanford Medicine researchers, Muslims have a greater risk of attempting suicide compared with those of other faiths. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford Muslim Mental Health Lab, discusses the study in this article.

  • KCRW

    “Sleeping should not be a chore”: The secret to a good night’s sleep

    Sleeping — something we do for roughly a third of our lifetimes — is essential for our physical and mental well being. Host Jonathan Bastian talks with Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the science of sleep and why we’re facing an “epidemic of sleep deprivation.”

  • Aljazeera

    ‘Under the prism’: Muslim Americans reflect on life post-9/11

    The attacks fuelled racism and increased US government surveillance, altering the lives of countless Muslim Americans. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • PR Newswire via SVLG

    New Report From SVLG Examines Post-Covid Mental Health Practices for Children As Local Schools Reopen

    With an influx of COVID-19--related funding targeted towards children's mental health, a new report from Silicon Valley Leadership Group's Education Team examines the steps Bay Area schools have taken to date to address the underlying stressors and concerns facing local youth. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    Words describing mental health can stigmatize. That’s painful and dehumanizing.

    People aren’t their illness. Don’t call someone “a schizophrenic,” for example, experts say. Instead say, “a person with schizophrenia.” Victor Schwartz, a psychiatrist at New York University School of Medicine who helped organize the Media and Mental Health Initiative at Stanford University, said that disparaging “language can feel shame-inducing. It makes it harder for people to reach out for help or admit they are having mental health problems.”

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Autism mouse models cluster by brain activity pattern

    Brain scans from 16 mouse models of autism reveal at least four distinct patterns of brain activity, a new study suggests. The findings lend fresh support to the popular idea that autism is associated with a range of brain ‘signatures.’ Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Stanford researcher shows once-nightly narcolepsy drug is safe, effective

    A phase 3 study has found that an extended-release version of sodium oxybate reduces daytime sleepiness and attacks of muscle weakness in narcolepsy patients. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the study in this article.

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Women in Medicine Month

    We asked some of the #StanfordWIM in our department to share their stories - why they pursued a career in medicine, what their work focuses on, what the most fulfilling parts of their work are, and what advice they would give themselves when they started in the field. Read what they have to say! #WomenInMedicine

  • WSJ

    After Covid-19 Lockdowns, Children Struggle to Rekindle Close Friendships

    Such friendships are crucial, experts say, in helping create a road map for successful adult relationships. Douglas Rait, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Couples and Family Therapy Clinic, provides comment in this article.

  • Oncology Times

    Can Virtual Integrative Medicine Help Physical & Psychological Challenges?

    MSKCC's Integrative Medicine at Home (or IM@Home) program, which offers daily, live, online lifestyle and mind-body classes in cardio-strength fitness training, yoga, Tai Chi, mindfulness meditation, music therapy, dance, and more for cancer patients and caregivers, is featured in this article. Sue Kim, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Study: Sleep Deprivation Affects the Brain Up to a Week Later

    Data from a new study suggests it may take longer than a week to recover from periods of short sleep when it comes to how quickly our brains are able to process new information. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment about the study in this article.

  • Association for Academic Psychiatry

    AAP 2021 Early Career Development Award

    Congratulations to Isheeta Zalpuri, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, recipient of the 2021 Association for Academic Psychiatry (AAP) Early Career Development Award, which recognizes outstanding leaders, educators, researchers, and clinicians in the field of psychiatry.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Youth mental health center opens in Palo Alto

    Two new spaces providing mental health services for youth opened in San Jose and Palo Alto this summer. allcove, a mental health group which provides services for people 12 to 25 for little to no cost, opened the two new centers in the East Bay on June 25 after a long history of providing digital services. Several members of the team at allcove, including the Youth Advisory Group and staff, and the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, are featured in this piece.

  • NPR.org

    In 'Dopamine Nation,' Overabundance Keeps Us Craving More

    Human beings are programmed to approach pleasure and avoid pain. It's an instinct that dates back millions of years, to a time when people needed to actively seek food, clothing and shelter every day, or risk death. But in today's world, such basic needs are often readily available — which changes the equation. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed here about her new book.

  • Apple Podcasts

    ‎Ahmed Khan Podcast: Preventing Suicide with Dr. Rania Awaad

    In observance of National Suicide Prevention Week, a week dedicated to bringing awareness around the topic of suicide, the harms associated with it, and how to prevent it, Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses how to prevent suicide from occurring and how to address the symptoms leading up to it in this podcast.

  • Psychiatric News

    Psychiatrists Create Initiative to Educate Media About Suicide Contagion

    The Media and Mental Health Initiative at Stanford University Department of Psychiatry aims to promote public health education about mental health and suicide. This is the first of two articles describing the initiative and issues around media reporting and suicide contagion. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Mental health declined during the pandemic: How can students rebound?

    The Daily spoke with several behavioral sciences experts to discuss ways students and teenagers can return to post-pandemic social life and increased mental health. Antonio Hardan, Elias Aboujaoude, and Steven Sust are quoted throughout.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Psychiatrists Concerned With the Afghanistan Situation: Ethical and Practical Issues

    What can psychiatrists do to help veterans, Muslims, immigrants, refugees, and all those affected by the US withdrawal? Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes this piece with colleagues who have formed a group called SPIRIT - Social Psychiatrists Interested in Recovery from International Trauma.

  • Healthline

    'Sunday Scaries' Have Become Worse During COVID-19

    More than half of working people in the United States report experiencing the “Sunday scaries,” a phenomenon in which people experience stress or anxiety on a Sunday before the coming workweek. David Spiegel, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.

  • WSJ

    Digital Addictions Are Drowning Us in Dopamine

    Rising rates of depression and anxiety in wealthy countries like the U.S. may be a result of our brains getting hooked on the neurotransmitter associated with pleasure. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses addiction in the Wall Street Journal essay.

  • AARP

    What to Do if You Suddenly Become a Family Caregiver

    Having to unexpectedly care for a loved one due to an accident or illness can be daunting. Get advice for navigating this unfamiliar world. Douglas Noordsy, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Huberman Lab Podcast

    Understanding & Treating Addiction

    In this episode, Andrew Huberman interviews Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic. They discuss the biology and psychology of why people become addicted to certain substances and behaviors and the key role that "dopamine balance" plays in creating addiction, as well as the science and practice of how to conquer addictions, why people relapse, and how to avoid relapsing.

  • Business Insider

    Meet the 30 young leaders forging a new future for the healthcare industry in 2021

    Business Insider selected business leaders, scientists, doctors, and entrepreneurs who are transforming the healthcare industry as we know it. Congratulations to Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was selected for her work in destigmatizing mental-health care and working with technology to bring mental health care to the masses.

  • Datebook

    90th anniversary California Book Awards showcase 11 stellar books created in the state

    Celebrating its 90th birthday, the jury of the California Book Awards has selected this year’s Gold and Silver Medal winners for its 2021 awards. Congratulations to Daniel Mason, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, for the fiction category gold medal for his book: "A Registry of My Passage Upon the Earth."

  • Healthier, Happy Lives Blog

    5 Questions: Elizabeth Reichert on Handling Back-to-School Anxiety in a Pandemic

    Returning to school as the pandemic stretches on may spark anxiety in young students, but there are approaches to build children’s resilience. Elizabeth Reichert, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • TechRadar

    Can tech improve your sleep?

    There are many activity trackers, devices and apps designed to track your sleep. Many sleep tech companies claim these solutions can help you understand your sleep, get more rest and build better sleep habits. But is sleep tracking accurate? And, importantly, can tech improve your sleep? Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article about sleep trackers.

  • Clinical Psychiatry News

    Clinical pearls for Muslim patients with suicide risk

    Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the unmet mental health needs of the Muslim American population - and some clinical pearls that may help clinicians meet the needs - in this article.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Research Institute

    Yelizaveta Sher, MD, FACLP named 2021 CFRI CF Professional of the Year Award

    At the 2021 Cystic Fibrosis Research Institute Conference, Yelizaveta Sher, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the 2021 CFRI CF Professional of the Year Award.

  • UC Santa Cruz News

    Five-year NIH grant supports collaborative research into rejuvenating the aging brain

    Scientists at UC Santa Cruz, UC Berkeley, and Stanford are working together to discover and treat the causes behind age-associated cognitive decline. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is part of the study.

  • CBS News

    Biden administration sued over substandard conditions at emergency sites for migrant teens

    Lawyers representing children in U.S. immigration custody asked a federal court on Monday to order the release of migrant teenagers from two emergency housing sites in Texas where minors have reported mental distress, substandard conditions, prolonged stays and inadequate services. Ryan Matlow, clinical associate professor, who interviewed migrant teens held at Fort Bliss, said children could suffer "clinically significant psychological harm" if they remain in large-scale sites like the Army base's tent camp for longer than a few days.

  • The Perkins Platform

    The Impact of Sleep on Decision-Making and Leadership

    The Perkins Platform podcast recently interviewed Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on the subject of sleep's impact on leadership and decision-making.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Genetic roots of sleep issues, autism may be entwined

    The genetic factors that influence autism may overlap with those that underlie insomnia, according to a new study of people with autism and their relatives. By contrast, the two conditions show minimal overlap in environmental influences. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Drugs boost serotonin, socialization in multiple autism mouse models

    The finding that MDMA and an experimental serotonin agonist increase sociability across six different model mice suggests that disparate autism-linked mutations converge on the same underlying pathways. Robert Malenka, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment about the findings.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    How students are redesigning the future of health care

    Stanford students share solutions they've developed to challenging health care problems through Stanford Health Technology showcase. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned in this article related to a website that he worked with Stanford Biodesign students on that provides parents of children with autism with comprehensive support and resources.

  • Live Science

    What's happening inside Simone Biles' brain when the 'twisties' set in?

    A complex system in the brain that keeps gymnasts balanced can get out of whack. Kelli Moran-Miller, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Healio

    Suicide attempt more common among Muslim adults than people of other faiths

    Muslim adults in the U.S. were twice as likely to report a history of suicide attempt compared with individuals from other faith traditions, according to results of a survey in a research letter published in JAMA Psychiatry. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Lancet

    A time of crisis for the opioid epidemic in the USA

    As the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA has eased, the extent of devastation caused during this period by the opioid epidemic is no longer obscured. Bolstering efforts to identify cohesive, evidence-based strategies for curtailing the opioid crisis, the Stanford–Lancet Commission on the North American Opioid Crisis was convened in February, 2020. Led by Keith Humphreys, it will investigate the causes and chart a course to curb not only fatalities but also disabilities and comorbidities associated with addiction, as well as wider impacts on affected communities.

  • Midpeninsula Post

    New Palo Alto teen clinic offers drop-in, accessible mental health care

    Teens in the Palo Alto area now have access to a groundbreaking walk-in mental health clinic, allcove — which is run by Santa Clara County Behavioral Health Services in collaboration with multiple agencies, including Stanford’s Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing — reimagines how mental health issues in the community are addressed through an approach of early intervention. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Program improves resilience for parents of kids with autism

    Learning techniques to build resilience lowers the stress and anxiety of raising a child with autism, Stanford research found. Grace Gengoux, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the study's senior author, provides comment.

  • Washington Post

    Drug overdose deaths soared to a record 93,000 last year

    The coronavirus pandemic and the continued spread of illegal fentanyl took a devastating toll on drug users, experts said, as the government reported a staggering increase in fatalities. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • San Francisco CBS Local

    Ketamine Seen As Possible Breakthrough Drug For Treating Range Of Mental Health Issues

    While COVID-19 may feel under control, many people are feeling mentally off - chronically exhausted, burned out, anxious, quick to anger, and depressed. One treatment offers hope, but it's not without controversy. Alan Schatzberg and Nolan Williams provide comment a recent study that was published online by the American Journal of Psychiatry.

  • Inverse

    Tired all the time? 3 signs you might be sleep-deprived

    In this article on sleep deprivation, two sleep experts discuss signs you're not getting enough sleep and how to sleep better. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CNN

    How to know if you have 'phone addiction' -- and 12 ways to address it

    Smartphones have become essential, but fixation with all they have to offer -- apps for social media, streaming, games and more -- can be a slippery slope. If you're finding it hard to look up from your phone these days, this article offers 12 ways to start moving in the right direction. Smita Das, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • USNWR

    1 in 20 College Students Has 'Internet Gaming Disorder,' Study Finds

    Phone interviews conducted among nearly 3,000 American college students between 2007 and 2015 revealed that roughly one in 20 had "internet gaming disorder," a clinical condition defined by the compulsive use of electronics, both online and offline. Maurice Ohayon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this coverage.

  • CNN

    Children slept over an hour more with mindfulness training, study finds

    Elementary schoolchildren who took mindfulness training two times a week for two years slept an average of 74 extra minutes a night, a new study found. That boost in total sleep time included an additional 24 minutes of rapid eye movement (REM), the dream stage of sleep when memories are consolidated and stored. Ruth O'Hara, Christina Chick, and Victor Carrion are quoted in the article about the study.

  • Burroughs Wellcome Fund

    2021 Career Awards for Medical Scientists Announced

    Supporting the research careers of medical doctors conducting biomedical investigation has long been a priority of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. The Career Award for Medical Scientists (CAMS) focuses on the transition of physician-scientists from postdocs/fellows into an independent research position. This program hopes to address the shortage of physicians entering the research workforce. Congratulations to Neir Eshel, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, CAMS recipient!

  • king5.com

    Understanding Munchausen by proxy

    Munchausen by Proxy is a widely misunderstood form of child abuse that can cause lifelong mental health issues and trauma for survivors. Mary Sanders, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was interviewed in this New Day NW segment to spread awareness on the sometimes controversial topic.

  • News Center

    Mindfulness training helps kids sleep better, Stanford Medicine study finds

    Children who learned techniques such as deep breathing and yoga slept longer and better, even though the curriculum didn’t instruct them in improving sleep, a Stanford study has found. Ruth O'Hara, Christina Chick, and Victor Carrion and other members of the study team are featured in this piece.

  • ABC News

    Surfside building collapse's mental toll

    Surfside search and rescue: Experts weigh in on mental health concerns as rescue efforts continue. Ripal Shah, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • New York Times

    The Challenges of Bipolar Disorder in Young People

    Bipolar disorder is most often diagnosed in the later teen years or young adulthood, affecting some 4 percent of people at some point in their lives. Symptoms in children may initially be mistaken for other conditions, and young people may suffer serious distress for years. Terence Ketter, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, emeritus, is quoted.

  • ABC News

    How to make returning to the office less painful

    While some companies, such as Twitter and DropBox, have said that employees may work remotely forever, others are planning a return to the office this summer or fall. For those making the switch from fully remote to in-person or hybrid work, the key to a successful re-entry is staying true to the spirit of the word "transition," experts say. Victor Carrión, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Palo Alto Online

    Long-awaited, and potentially ground-breaking, drop-in clinic for youth opens

    Last Friday, the first two allcove centers - in San José and Palo Alto - began offering services supporting the mental health and wellbeing of young people. The opening of these first two centers is the culmination of many years of work to bring integrated mental health resources to local youth. Several members of the team at allcove, including the Youth Advisory Group and staff, and the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, are featured in this piece.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Attitude toward mistakes -- and lack of self-care -- harm physicians' well-being

    Physicians experience burnout more than most workers, but the problem isn't inherent to the medical profession, according to a study conducted by Mickey Trockel, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and colleagues. The study compared physicians' self-compassion with those of people in other professions and pointed to the causes of physician burnout.

  • AP News

    For some US Muslims, raw talk on suicide, mental health

    Rania Awaad, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Muslim Mental Health & Islamic Psychology Lab, and other mental health professionals are working alongside some faith leaders and activists to bring nuance and compassion to conversations, raise awareness in Muslim communities about suicide prevention and mental health, and provide religiously and culturally sensitive guidance.

  • Viral Facts - Digital Medic initiative at Stanford University

    Mental Health During COVID-19

    During COVID-19, many people experienced additional worries about getting the virus, the health of themselves and of loved ones, job security, physical distancing, and grief. An estimated 4/10 Americans reported symptoms of anxiety or depression. So what can you do to care for your mental health? What are some ways to improve mental wellbeing? Watch as Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains in this week’s episode of Viral Facts - brought to you by the Stanford Center for Health Education and its Digital Medic initiative.

  • Casper Star-Tribune Online

    My dream is a medical school in Wyoming

    Jonathan Updike, resident in psychiatry, writes about his dream for Wyoming to invest in building a medical school, as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security ACT (CARES Act) and American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds being awarded to the state.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Annual awards recognize excellence in medical training, biosciences

    Faculty, staff members, residents and students were recently honored for their contributions to Stanford Medicine, including Yasmin Owusu, Sally Huang, and Janelle Ruiz in psychiatry and behavioral sciences - congratulations, all!

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Neuroscientist's book traverses the extremes of human behavior

    Stanford bioengineer, neuroscientist, and practicing psychiatrist, Karl Deisseroth, is a pioneer in developing game-changing technologies that enable scientists to probe the brain's circuitry in a methodical search for the roots of behavior. This post covers his new book, "Projections: A Story of Human Emotions." - a work of literature that weaves together fictionalized stories, historical imagination, science, and personal experience to explore universal themes in human behavior.

  • Quartz

    Phone addiction is all too real

    Debate has raged about whether digital addiction is a real affliction or something akin to a strong habit. As the evidence has accumulated, however, doctors and psychiatrists are increasingly confident classifying our digital devices as addictive, not unlike cigarettes or gambling. This June, a team of economists from Harvard, Stanford, and New York universities released a white paper entitled, simply, “Digital Addiction” that used economic methods, such as small payments, to analyze people’s “digital self-control problems.” Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this coverage.

  • Mount Sinai Health System

    Beyond Sleep Hygiene

    Like exercise and nutrition, sleep is central to good health. And yet, so many of us don’t get enough high-quality sleep. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this Mt Sinai 'Road to Resilience' podcast.

  • Healio.com

    Daridorexant shows promise as insomnia therapy, safe in OSA subset

    A survey of patients with insomnia who participated in two phase 3 trials investigating daridorexant reported that “improved daytime functioning” was the most important treatment outcome for their condition. The study was one of several abstracts on the oral sleep therapy daridorexant (Idorsia Pharmaceuticals) that were presented during the virtual SLEEP 2021 meeting. Emmanuel Mignot, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article about the study.

  • HealthTalks - Stanford Children's Health

    CHD Talk with Stanford Psychologists

    Having CHD or caring for someone with CHD is a long and hard journey. It is ok to not be okay sometimes. You are not alone and there is support when you need it. In this podcast episode, Katie Sears Edwards and Lauren Mikula-Schneider, discuss adjustments that many CHD patients are experiencing and share their recommendations for when to get help, how to ask, what to ask for and what are the best ways to maintain good mental health.

  • NPR.org

    Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

    A new CDC study finds that people who provide unpaid care for their children or adult loved ones are twice as likely as noncaregivers to have experienced depression or anxiety, or thoughts of suicide. Dolores Gallagher-Thompson, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Washington Post

    Addiction treatment had failed. Could brain surgery save him?

    This article covers a unique case of substance use disorder in the United States that was relieved by deep brain stimulation. Robert Malenka, Pritzker professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • SELF

    13 Energizing Afternoon Habits That Can Make the Rest of Your Day So Much Better

    Even if you enjoy work, focusing on it all day can be mentally exhausting and straight-up stressful. Taking breaks in the form of rejuvenating afternoon habits—even teensy ones—can help. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NPR.org

    Needle Exchanges, Access To Safer Narcotics Could Save Lives — But It's A Tough Sell

    Researchers and doctors say they know how to curb harm caused by addiction and the spread of dangerous drugs. But lawmakers are reluctant to allow needle exchanges and access to safer narcotics. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Herbert Leiderman, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, dies at 97

    P. Herbert Leiderman, MD, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine, who was well known for his early research on mother-infant bonding, died April 1. He was 97.

  • the Guardian

    Neuroscientist Karl Deisseroth: ‘Coronavirus has changed us all’

    The coronavirus pandemic has been a disorienting kind of emergency. Covid-19 is a disease that attacks the lungs, but it has also worsened mental health while causing a drastic reduction in patients seeking care for depression, self-harm, eating disorders and anxiety. Karl Deisseroth, D.H. Chen Professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this article.

  • EurekAlert!

    AASM congratulates 2021 Trainee Investigator Award recipients

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine congratulates the recipient of the 2021 Trainee Investigator Award and the three individuals who received the honorable mention designation - including Christina Chick, postdoctoral research fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences. They were recognized during the AASM annual membership meeting, which was held as a webcast on Monday, June 14.

  • Borneo Bulletin Online

    Headphones offer a compromise

    With the pandemic’s added stressors, some people's sleep and mindfulness practices aren't working anymore. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on potential effective sleep aids.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Shaul Druckmann Named 2021 McKnight Scholar

    Shaul Druckmann, assistant professor of neurobiology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has been named to receive a 2021 McKnight Foundation Scholar Award for his research into how the brain computes using activity distributed across populations and brain areas.

  • Slate Magazine

    I’m Vaccinated. I Can’t Stop Double-Masking and Wearing Safety Goggles.

    Just because things are reopening doesn’t mean we’re all mentally ready. On this episode of "How To!" Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides advice to help reframe risk and find coping strategies to get back out there.

  • HealthTalks - Stanford Children's Health

    Podcast: CHD Talk with Stanford Psychologists

    Having CHD or caring for someone with CHD is a long and hard journey. It is ok to not be okay sometimes. You are not alone and there is support when you need it. In this podcast episode, Katie Sears Edwards and Lauren Mikula-Schneider, discuss adjustments that many CHD patients are experiencing and share their recommendations for when to get help, how to ask, what to ask for and what are the best ways to maintain good mental health.

  • NPR.org

    Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

    A new CDC study finds that people who provide unpaid care for their children or adult loved ones are twice as likely as noncaregivers to have experienced depression or anxiety, or thoughts of suicide. Dolores Gallagher-Thompson, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Washington Post

    Addiction treatment had failed. Could brain surgery save him?

    This article covers a unique case of substance use disorder in the United States that was relieved by deep brain stimulation. Robert Malenka, Pritzker professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • SELF

    13 Energizing Afternoon Habits That Can Make the Rest of Your Day So Much Better

    Even if you enjoy work, focusing on it all day can be mentally exhausting and straight-up stressful. Taking breaks in the form of rejuvenating afternoon habits—even teensy ones—can help. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Science News

    Controlling nerve cells with light opened new ways to study the brain

    In less than two decades, optogenetics has led to big insights into how memories are stored, what creates perceptions, and what happens in the brain during depression and addiction. The work of Karl Deisseroth, D.H. Chen Professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is discussed in this article.

  • NPR.org

    Needle Exchanges, Access To Safer Narcotics Could Save Lives — But It's A Tough Sell

    Researchers and doctors say they know how to curb harm caused by addiction and the spread of dangerous drugs. But lawmakers are reluctant to allow needle exchanges and access to safer narcotics. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Herbert Leiderman, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, dies at 97

    P. Herbert Leiderman, MD, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine, who was well known for his early research on mother-infant bonding, died April 1. He was 97.

  • the Guardian

    Neuroscientist Karl Deisseroth: ‘Coronavirus has changed us all’

    The coronavirus pandemic has been a disorienting kind of emergency. Covid-19 is a disease that attacks the lungs, but it has also worsened mental health while causing a drastic reduction in patients seeking care for depression, self-harm, eating disorders and anxiety. Karl Deisseroth, D.H. Chen Professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this article.

  • EurekAlert!

    AASM congratulates 2021 Trainee Investigator Award recipients

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine congratulates the recipient of the 2021 Trainee Investigator Award and the three individuals who received the honorable mention designation - including Christina Chick, postdoctoral research fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences. They were recognized during the AASM annual membership meeting, which was held as a webcast on Monday, June 14.

  • Borneo Bulletin

    Headphones offer a compromise

    With the pandemic’s added stressors, some people's sleep and mindfulness practices aren't working anymore. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on potential effective sleep aids.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Shaul Druckman Named 2021 McKnight Scholar

    Shaul Druckmann, assistant professor of neurobiology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has been named to receive a 2021 McKnight Foundation Scholar Award for his research into how the brain computes using activity distributed across populations and brain areas.

  • Slate Magazine

    I’m Vaccinated. I Can’t Stop Double-Masking and Wearing Safety Goggles.

    Just because things are reopening doesn’t mean we’re all mentally ready. On this episode of "How To!" Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides advice to help reframe risk and find coping strategies to get back out there.

  • Eurasia Review

    Why Drug Abuse, Not Climate Change, Is America’s Biggest Problem – OpEd

    One of America’s biggest problems is drug abuse, not climate change. In 2020, nearly 90,000 people in the U.S. died from drug overdoses or poisonings. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • Psychiatry & Behavioral Health Learning Network

    Best Practices for Matching Patients With Effective Antipsychotics and Mitigating Adverse Effects

    In this video, Jacob Ballon, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses key best practices for matching patients with schizophrenia with an effective antipsychotic, why patients do not adhere to their medication treatment, and how to mitigate the adverse effects experienced by patients.

  • Forbes

    Naomi Osaka Wanted Her $15,000 Fine Donated To Charity And CALM Listened

    Naomi Osaka skipped press for her French Open win because of her mental health. She was fined $15,000. She asked that the fines be donated to a mental health charity, but when she was threatened with suspension, she dropped out of the tournament instead. CALM followed through on her wish and more. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece written by residency alum Jessica Gold.

  • Psychology Today

    A Prescription for Nations: Eight Principles for Recovery

    Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, MD, Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, provides eight principles for national recovery in part II of this Psychology Today piece.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Op-Ed: Big Food wants us addicted to junk food. New brain science may break its grip

    This op-ed on the food industry mentions Eric Stice, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and his current research on ways to help us rewire our brains to change the balance between the part that compels us to act compulsively and the part that considers the consequences of our actions.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Medical anthropologist Lochlann Jain and psychiatrist Daniel Mason awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

    Seven Stanford faculty members were named 2021 Guggenheim Fellows in April, including Daniel Mason, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. This honor recognizes those who have “demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.” This article is one of a three-part series profiling the Stanford scholars honored with this award for 2021.

  • PsyPost

    New study sheds light on cognitive mechanisms linked to hypnosis

    New research provides evidence that the tendency to respond to hypnosis is linked to cognitive flexibility. The findings, recently published in Scientific Reports by Afik Faerman and David Spiegel, indicate that people with higher levels of hypnotizability tend to be better at shifting between different mental sets.

  • The Cut

    I Won’t Shut Up About My Sunrise Alarm Clock

    In this article about sunrise alarm clocks, Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses how light is one of the most important ways that our brains perceive time.

  • Learning Lots Podcast

    Bill Hader on Anxiety + Dr. Nina Vasan

    In this episode, Bill Hader talks with Brie and Jessie about anxiety and how it has affected his career. They're also joined by Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, for a look at the medical and scientific side of anxiety.

  • Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health

    5 Questions with Global Health Faculty Fellow Dr. Christina Khan on building mental health services infrastructure in rural Guatemala

    Learn more about how Christina Khan is using her global health work to demonstrate that in under-resourced settings, healthcare professionals have an appetite for providing mental health services, even if they don’t have the infrastructure.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Stanford experts talk COVID mental health transitions in 2021

    The next phase of the global pandemic will bring new mental health challenges, so Stanford experts offer tips for building resilience. Victor Carrion and Debra Kaysen are quoted.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Dreaming of New Treatments

    At the 2021 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting, Ruth O’Hara presented initial data on the impacts of delta activity at sleep onset (DASO). Study participants with DASO demonstrated better affective function overall and over time, which led to the conclusion that testing DASO or other variables may help clinicians predict patients’ cognitive futures.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Toolmakers aim to untangle fundamental challenges in neuroscience

    Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute advances its ambitious “Big Ideas” Initiatives to the next level - two programs are forging new technologies and connections between disciplines that have the potential to transform the field. The Stanford Brain Organogenesis Program, led by Sergiu Pasca and Karl Deisseroth, is highlighted in this piece.

  • Psychology Today

    A Prescription for Nations: How Trauma Can Inform Policy

    The continuing fallout from what manifested in 2020 confirms that avoidance and neglect are no longer acceptable approaches to managing our problems. The year 2020 was transformative, and that transformation for us individually and as a nation is not yet finished. Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, MD, Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, provides perspective in this Psychology Today piece.

  • The Mercury News

    COVID: How to approach physical and mental health in a post-pandemic world

    Health experts say people are going to respond very differently as society reopens, and that’s ok. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Insider

    4 ways to ease yourself back into nights out after more than a year of pandemic

    If you find yourself with a busy social calendar after more than a year of social isolation, experts say that are ways to ease yourself into drinking. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment and some approaches that can help moderate the return to social nights out.

  • Psychiatry & Behavioral Health Learning Network

    Novel Personalized Neuromodulation Approach May Rapidly Treat Depression

    In this video, Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses his recent session presented at the virtual 2021 APA Annual Meeting that explained the shift from oral daily antidepressants to more effective neuromodulation or medication-based rapid-acting interventions.

  • Washington Post

    Is my child addicted to Roblox?

    Much has been written about this gaming juggernaut. In 2020, 36 million people — two-thirds of whom were under 16 — spent over 30 billion hours on the online platform. Many of those users, it seems, are parented by people who, like the author of this perspective piece, are worried that their kids are spending too much time playing it. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • ReliefWeb

    Security Council Arria Formula Meeting Highlights UNITAD Innovation and Partnership as Model for Accountability Efforts Globally

    UNITAD’s innovative and technology–focused approach to the collection and analysis of evidence of ISIL crimes was welcomed by United Nations Member States in an Arria Formula Meeting of the Security Council recently, chaired by the United Kingdom. At the event, two key pillars of innovation were highlighted: the use of advanced technology to exploit mass data collection; and applying a trauma-informed approach to all aspects of contacts with witnesses and survivors. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of Stanford's Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program, presented at the meeting.

  • NPR.org

    We're Bad At Calculating Risk

    On this episode of "The Indicator from Planet Money," the hosts discuss how we assess risk. Why are we so often more worried about shark attacks and dying in fiery plane crashes than cancer or COVID? Life requires us to constantly calculate the odds and we're just not very good at it. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Autism mutation may cause big brain via ‘don’t eat me’ signals

    An autism-linked mutation could make the brain grow unusually large by prompting cells to express a chemical signal better known for its connection to cancer. Lead investigator of the study, Sundari Chetty, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford funds community projects to address pandemic challenges

    Eight faculty-led projects have been funded to work with regional community organizations and agencies to address challenges associated with the pandemic. "allcove Youth - Amplifying Youth Mental Health Services and Voices" led by Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, is one of the eight projects highlighted in this article.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Expanded opioid addiction care could save lives, cut costs, study shows

    Opioid-addiction care of medication and counseling could cut deaths by 16.9% and save up to $105,000 over lifetime of a patient’s care, study shows. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and coauthor of the study, is quoted.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    Many San Franciscans in jail struggle with addiction. Would this polarizing treatment option help them?

    The city funds roughly 486 treatment beds, but none that exclude clients who use medications. An unknown number of beds are privately run, including some that are abstinence-based. The need for treatment is especially acute for those in the criminal justice system. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • ScienceAlert

    Is It Possible to Get Too Much Sleep? Here's What Scientists Think

    Sleep has a major impact on our health and wellbeing. Busy lifestyles often make it difficult to sleep as much as we would like to. Not sleeping enough affects our mood, ability to focus, and risk of many medical conditions. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • ABC News

    The unwitting are the target of COVID-19 falsehoods online

    People have unwittingly had their online posts or pictures exploited to spread misinformation about COVID-19 in recent months. During the COVID-19 pandemic, false or misleading posts can mean the difference between someone taking precautions or not. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine

    One-way fear signals hamper anxious kids’ ability to regulate emotion

    The research, published April 21 in Biological Psychiatry, explored how anxiety and chronic stress change emotion-regulation circuits in 10- and 11-year-olds. Brain scans examined signals between one of the two amygdalae — fear centers on the brain’s right and left sides — and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a region involved in decision-making and regulating emotion. Anxious and stressed kids had stronger signals from the fear center to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but no such effects in the reverse direction. They were also less able to modify their emotional reactions during the study. Senior author Vinod Menon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Brain tissue research points to genetic schizophrenia clue

    New brain tissue research shows a possible link between schizophrenia and a genetic condition where a section of chromosome 22 is deleted. In a study published Sept. 28 in Nature Medicine, the investigators found an aberration in nerve cells from patients with the genetic condition known as 22q11DS, in which a particular section of chromosome 22 is deleted. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Investigative Team to Promote Accountability for Crimes Committed by Da'esh/ISIL (UNITAD)

    Supporting Survivors to Come Forward: Engaging with those impacted by trauma

    Engaging with witnesses and survivors in a manner sensitive to the trauma they may have suffered has been a central priority of UNITAD. Reflecting this approach, the Team established a dedicated team of psycho-social experts to ensure a trauma-informed approach is taken in all interviews. In doing so, the Team aims to create conditions whereby witnesses can provide the fullest possible account while ensuring the utmost regard for their well-being. At the May 12 meeting, UNITAD launched the “Trauma-Informed Investigations Field Guide”, a new publication drawing on the trauma-informed approached adopted by UNITAD to provide practical guidance to investigators in domestic and international entities with respect to their engagement with vulnerable survivors and witnesses. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of Stanford's Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program, presented to the committee.

  • Business Wire

    Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation to Honor Oregon Attorney General and Stanford Professor

    Two pioneering women who have significantly advanced public education and dialogue around addiction and recovery will be honored as the first recipients of the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation’s new Humanitarian Award. Congratulations to Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences!

  • One Mind

    Brain Waves: Boosting Children's Resilience with Dr. Steven Adelsheim and Jeni Olsen

    How can we boost the resilience of children after they experience trauma? Dr. Steven Adelsheim, Director, Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing at Stanford University School of Medicine and Jeni Olsen, Prevention Director at Mentis: Napa’s Center for Mental Health Services discuss this and more on this episode of Brain Waves.

  • Psychiatric News

    Are Brain Organoids The Next Big Thing?

    In the past decade, a new model system has been gaining steam in neuroscience—the brain organoid. These 3D constructs are grown from human stem cells and mimic many aspects of brain development. Brain organoids average the size of a tiny pea, but within that clump of cells, neurons are growing, making connections, and sending electrical signals to each other. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Fast-Acting Options for Mood Disorders and Psychiatric Emergencies

    Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Charles DeBattista, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, presented in a panel at the 2021 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting on rapidly acting medications - this article summarizes the presentations.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    'You just get used to being locked down': Pandemic anxiety is keeping people home as the Bay Area reopens

    As California and the Bay Area make big steps toward reopening, many people don’t feel ready to return to anything like normal. A March survey by the American Psychological Association had similar findings: 46% of those polled said they didn’t feel comfortable “living life like they used to before the pandemic,” while 49% said they were feeling uneasy about adjusting to “in-person interaction once the pandemic ends.” David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • American Psychiatric Association - Annual Meeting

    Dr. Rona Hu receives the APA's 2021 Kun-Po Soo Award

    At the 2021 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting, Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was awarded the APA's 2021 Kun-Po Soo Award for contributions toward understanding the impact and importance of Asian cultural heritage in areas relevant to psychiatry. Congratulations, Dr. Hu!

  • Nature News

    Psychedelic drugs without the trip? This sensor could help seek them out

    Scientists in search of psychedelic drug treatments have developed a way to determine whether a molecule is likely to cause hallucinations, without testing it on people or animals. Robert Malenka, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and deputy director of the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, who was not part of the study, provides comment.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Struggling with Zoom fatigue? Stanford psychologists give solutions

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, increased use of Zoom and other video conferencing platforms have resulted in Zoom fatigue — a documented phenomenon of exhaustion caused by extended hours videoconferencing. But, students and professors have found some ways to mitigate these feelings through self-care and breaks. Shea Fedigan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • NPR.org

    As Opioid Deaths Surge, Biden Team Moves To Make Buprenorphine Treatment Mainstream

    The Biden administration says new federal guidelines released Tuesday will allow far more medical practitioners to prescribe buprenorphine, a drug proven to reduce opioid relapses and overdose deaths. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was interviewed.

  • US News & World Report

    Lullaby Effect: Music Can Speed Your Way to Sleep, Study Finds

    Music hath charms to soothe you off to slumber, new research suggests. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Psycom.net

    The New Sobriety

    Sobriety seems to be trending as people explore new ways to drink less alcohol without giving up booze completely. This piece discusses how the drinking culture is being redefined and lists seven new approaches to drinking less alcohol. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Sleep Research Society

    2021 Outstanding Early Investigator Awards announced by the Sleep Research Society

    Shi-Bin Li, basic life research scientist in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is a recipient of the Sleep Research Society's Outstanding Early Investigator Award, which recognizes an outstanding research effort by an early-stage investigator in the field of sleep research.

  • Science Times

    Technology, Gadgets Use May Change Human Body Clock; Here's What to Do

    Since the light bulb was patented in 1879, mankind has been guided day and night by artificial lighting, now available from television sets to smartphone screens - and a growing body of research proves their effect on our circadian rhythm. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article on the subject.

  • Psychiatric News

    From D-Day to Beirut: Bibliotherapy as Adjunct in Trauma Recovery?

    Several treatments have been proposed for the victims of trauma. Cognitive processing therapy, desensitization therapy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and the alpha-1 adrenergic blocker prazosin all have evidence to support their use. Others like memory consolidation blockers and virtual reality-based interventions hold promise. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, highlights the possibility of bibliotherapy for PTSD as an augmentation to treatment in this article.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine

    Pot commercialization tied to self-harm by younger men, study suggests

    Suicide attempts and other self-harm may increase among men under the age of 40 in states that allow recreational use of marijuana, particularly those with for-profit dispensaries, Stanford study suggests. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the senior author of the study.

  • Mashable

    How to explain autism to kids

    If the past year has taught us anything, talking to children about diversity is vital in helping to raise thoughtful, sensitive kids. And those discussions should also expand to include conversations around neurodiversity, including autism. Grace Gengoux, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Poor sleep could be core feature of autism, related conditions

    Fruit flies with low expression of a gene linked to neurodevelopment have disrupted sleep, poor memory and altered social behavior. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the study.

  • Stanford Magazine

    Of Two Minds

    We’re eager to reenter regular life. Then again, we’re scared to. Here’s how to put the risks into perspective. David Spiegel, associate chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Sarah Adler, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provide comment in this article.

  • STAT

    Despite critics, researchers investigate possible new mental health disorder

    Sluggish cognitive tempo, or SCT, is not an officially recognized disorder, but a group of researchers is investigating whether it could be a potential new mental health disorder. Sonia Gaur, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Gizmodo Australia

    Why Do I Feel Like I'm Dying During a Panic Attack?

    Many, many people have been convinced, in the first throes of a panic episode, that their systems were permanently shutting down. Thankfully, these people were wrong: a panic attack cannot actually kill you. Cold comfort, in the moment, but good to keep in mind, which is why we’ve made it the subject of this week’s Giz Asks. Craig Barr Taylor, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.

  • Stanford Today

    Seven Stanford scholars awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

    Among those honored with 2021 Guggenheim Fellowships is Daniel Mason, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. With his Guggenheim Fellowship, Mason will continue to work on a novel that examines the enduring influence of history, both human and ecological, on a group of characters living through a period of environmental change.

  • WSJ

    Loneliness, Anxiety and Loss: the Covid Pandemic’s Terrible Toll on Kids

    A year of school shutdowns and family trauma leads to social isolation, stress and mental-health issues. Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, MD, Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, describes how a child's brain can react to post traumatic stress situations.

  • MuslimMatters.org

    How To Respond To Suicide In Muslim Communities

    In this article, Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and colleagues, offer steps that community leaders and community members can take together to prevent additional suicides and support healthy patterns of communal grieving and healing.

  • Harper's BAZAAR

    The Expert Guide To Finally Getting a Good Night's Sleep

    You’re not wrong: Getting a good night’s rest has gotten even harder over the past year. Harper's BAZAAR asked the experts how to reset poor habits and wake up feeling refreshed. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Refinery29

    How Lockdown Helped Me Connect Deeper With Islam

    In this article, Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who also has a background in Islamic Studies, describes the relationship between religion and mental health and shares perspectives on the COVID experience.

  • NY Times

    How I Time Travel to Parent My Adult Son

    Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, MD, Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, explains how a child's brain matures into its 20s.

  • NY Times

    Need to Dust Off Your Social Skills?

    After a year of virtual gathering, getting back to real-life relationships can be intimidating. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on how re-entering a lifestyle closed off for a long time can feel disorienting and difficult.

  • Scientific American

    Forgotten Memories of Traumatic Events Get Some Backing from Brain-Imaging Studies

    Trauma therapists have long maintained that abuse experienced early in life can overwhelm the central nervous system, causing children to split off a painful memory from conscious awareness. A study published in February in the American Journal of Psychiatry, the flagship journal of the APA, highlights the considerable scientific evidence that bolsters the arguments of trauma therapists. Vinod Menon, the Rachel L. and Walter F. Nichols professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • The Addiction Psychologist Podcast

    Dr. Debra Kaysen - PTSD and Alcohol Use Disorder

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) often co-occur. A great deal of research has attempted to understand the nature of this relationship. Is PTSD a risk factor for AUD? Is high risk drinking a risk factor for PTSD? These questions can help us understand which of the two disorders to target first. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, talks about her research on treatments for co-occurring PTSD and AUD, focusing special attention toward state of the art science on ordering effects in this podcast episode.

  • CNET

    The bad dreams and sleep you've had since COVID have a name: coronasomnia

    If you're sleeping worse and dreaming about the pandemic, you're not alone. And they've got a name for it: coronasomnia. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • USA TODAY

    George Floyd's addiction could change how we talk about drug use and Black Americans

    In this USA Today article, Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses society bias toward drug users.

  • NIDA News

    NIDA's Featured Paper of the Month – April 2021

    Quitting smoking is hard. This is largely due to the nicotine withdrawal syndrome. Withdrawal from cigarettes is characterized by craving, bad feelings and losses of attention. Importantly, these negative symptoms are known to fluctuate wildly in time. Inspired by this, NIDA scientists applied a technique that looked at how communication across the entire brain fluctuated over time during smoking and withdrawal. Vinod Menon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is a co-author on NIDA's paper of the month: "Time-Varying Functional Connectivity Decreases as a Function of Acute Nicotine Abstinence."

  • VICE

    ‘Why Can’t I Stick to a Bedtime?’

    Sleep is one of the body’s most basic needs—which is why it can be confusing when bedtime becomes a battle between what your brain wants (information about Stanley Tucci) and what it needs (REM sleep, for starters). If you find yourself unable to stick to a bedtime, you’re not alone—and you’re not totally out of luck. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.

  • SELF

    6 Ways to Deal With COVID-19 Grief and Loss

    To date, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that over 500,000 people have died of COVID-19 in the United States, which means over 4 million people in this country have lost a partner, friend, family member, or other loved one. You’re not alone. Irvin Yalom, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article on the topics of grief, loss, and regret.

  • Science News

    Octopus sleep includes a frenzied, colorful, ‘active’ stage

    Octopuses cycle through two stages of slumber, a new study reports. First comes quiet sleep, and then a shift to a twitchy, active sleep in which vibrant colors flash across the animals’ skin. These details, gleaned from four snoozing cephalopods in a lab in Brazil, may provide clues to a big scientific mystery: Why do animals sleep? Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • WSJ

    Can Artificial Intelligence Replace Human Therapists?

    Three experts discuss the promise—and problems—of relying on algorithms for our mental health. Adam Miner, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this article.

  • Art & Tech For a Better World

    A new generation of designers

    Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing Program Director Vicki Harrison shares about #GoodforMEdia, the newly launched peer mentoring campaign exploring the "ME" in media.

  • Medscape

    New Expert Guidance on Ketamine for Resistant Depression

    An international panel of mood disorder experts has published guidance on how to safely and effectively use ketamine and esketamine to treat adults with treatment-resistant depression. Alan Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Mental Health Professionals’ Network

    Treating trauma: Prolonged Exposure, Cognitive Processing Therapy and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing

    In this podcast, three treatments for trauma with the largest body of research support are covered: Prolonged Exposure (PE), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this episode.

  • Allure

    Turns Out, Spring Cleaning Is Good for Your Mental Health

    A case for decluttering, plus tips to do so from The Home Edit team at Allure. This piece discusses the positive mental health effects of decluttering and quotes Carolyn Rodriguez, associate dean of academic affairs in the School of Medicine, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and director of the Stanford Hoarding Disorders Research Program.

  • Consumer Health News | HealthDay

    Legalized Pot Tied to Rise in Young Men's Suicide Attempts

    States that make marijuana a readily available retail item might see an increase in self-harm among younger men, a new study suggests. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses how the findings should be considered in the debate over states' recreational marijuana policies.

  • CBS Local: San Francisco

    Asian American Attacks: A Guide For Parents Struggling To Explain Hate Crimes To Their Children

    The ongoing, nationwide attacks on the AAPI community are forcing Asian American parents into tense, complex discussions on race and racism within their immediate family. Mari Kurahashi, Co-Director of the Stanford Parenting Center and clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • Palo Alto Online

    Living 6 feet apart: Here's what Midpeninsula residents are taking away from a year of life in a pandemic

    One year in, locals share their experiences of life under the COVID-19 pandemic and takeaways from this unprecedented, and hopefully not-to-be-repeated, year. Rona Hu, associate dean at Stanford University School of Medicine and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares her family's story.

  • Center for Care Innovations

    Tackling America’s Deadliest Drug Epidemic: How CCI Helped Transform Addiction Treatment During the Pandemic

    It’s a crisis on top of a crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic has collided with the country’s opioid epidemic, shrinking access to life-saving treatments and recovery support services while compounding stress, isolation, and economic dislocation. Yet, despite the ravages of the pandemic, CCI’s "Addiction Treatment Starts Here" programs continue to transform treatment in California through an evidence-based approach to curbing opioid overdose and death. Mark McGovern, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this report.

  • CBS Local: San Francisco

    Volunteers Patrol Chinatown Streets in Wake of Violent Attacks on Asians

    Volunteers patrol the streets of Chinatown in Oakland to protect the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community. Recent violence has taken an emotional toll on the Asian American community, and experts say this is the time to speak up and set an example for the next generation. Mari Kurahashi, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this segment.

  • Washington Post

    Amid attacks, Asian Americans challenge traditions that discourage speaking out, seeking therapy

    Many Asian Americans and Asian immigrants are struggling with the constant emotional onslaught from the ongoing attacks against Asian Americans. This article discusses how there is a lack of mental health resources in the necessary languages and a shortage of counselors who share Asian heritage. Steven Sust, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Song Kim, program manager in the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provide comment.

  • NY Times

    A Documentary Explores Dissociative Identity Disorder

    This piece discusses dissociative identity disorder and highlights a new documentary that shows the challenges involved in learning to live with the disorder. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: Could too much pot make you sick?

    Bay Area emergency room doctors say they're seeing an increase in the number of patients presenting with what had been a rare reaction to cannabis use. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was interviewed during this segment.

  • Stanford News

    New technique reveals genes underlying human evolution

    In separate studies, researchers compared gene regulation related to brain and face development in humans and chimpanzees using a new technique. In both cases, they discovered new genetic differences between these species. Sergiu Pașca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned in this article.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Can Mindfulness Help You Sleep Better?

    There’s research to suggest yes, regularly practicing mindfulness can help you fall asleep quicker and stay asleep throughout the night. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • WRAL.com

    Nearly half of parents said teens face new or worsening mental health issues during pandemic, poll says

    Nearly half of parents reported their teenagers faced new or worsening mental health conditions since the pandemic began, a new poll has found. Stephanie Clarke, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Benefits of Fish Oil: Can It Help Bipolar Disorder?

    While studies do show fish oil (from food or supplements) can support mental health, less is known about its specific role in helping with bipolar disorder. Shebani Sethi Dalai, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Fragile X Research - FRAXA Research Foundation

    FRAXA Research Foundation Announces New Grant

    FRAXA Research Foundation has awarded a research grant to Stanford University principal investigators Philippe Mourrain and Gordon Wang, along with postdoctoral fellow, Rochelle Coulson. They are evaluating additive effects of combinatorial drug treatments to correct a broad spectrum of deficits observed in Fragile X syndrome.

  • GQ

    How to Fix Your Messed-Up Sleep Position

    Beyond helping alleviate medical concerns like sleep apnea, pain, and even heartburn, the main goal of a good "sleep posture" is to make yourself as comfortable as possible so that you fall asleep more easily. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Schizophrenia International Research Society

    2021 Basic Research Award

    The Schizophrenia International Research Society has named Sergiu Pașca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, the 2021 Basic Research Awardee. Congratulations, Dr. Pasca!

  • Vet Candy

    Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace

    Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals. Published in the journal PLOS Biology and led by academics from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), Stanford University, and the University of Vienna, the research is the first large-scale study into the evolution of the larynx. Daniel Bowling, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    You like to drift off to podcasts. Your partner prefers silence. Headphones offer a compromise.

    Although the effect of sleeping in headphones has not been well-studied, experts believe it is generally safe. Here are their recommendations for addressing your relaxation needs while protecting your hearing and your quality of sleep. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Year-old organoids echo genetic shifts seen at birth

    3D cultures of human brain cells kept alive for more than a year undergo transitions in gene activity that resemble those seen in newborns, and may be used to study autism genes in postnatal stages of brain development. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.

  • Stanford Psychiatry - CYMHW

    Schools are reopening: Why students might need more support than ever

    Many children have lived through a great deal of hardship and loss over the past year, disproportionately so youth from marginalized or resource-scarce backgrounds. As young people struggled to acclimate to their new remote learning landscape, the news headlines have been consistently frightening and confusing for many of them, adding to an overall feeling of potential uncertainty and underlying fear for their own personal safety. Vicki Harrison and Jules Villanueva-Castaño, from the Center for Youth Mental Health & Wellbeing, discuss the return to school in this piece.