Bio

Honors & Awards


  • Member of the DARPA Shredder Challenge winning team “All Your Shreds Are Belong to Us”, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (2011)
  • 4th prize in speed poster competition, ImmunoVancouver conference (2011)
  • 2nd prize in the Life Sciences Institute junior poster competition, University of British Columbia (2009)
  • Graduate entrance scholarship, University of British Columbia (2008)

Professional Affiliations and Activities


  • Reviewer, PLoS One (2013 - Present)
  • Member, Golden Key Honor Society (2008 - Present)
  • Member, Canadian Society for Immunology (2009 - 2012)
  • Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science (2009 - 2011)
  • Member, Student Biotechnology Network (2005 - 2011)

Education & Certifications


  • M.Sc., University of British Columbia, Microbiology & Immunology (2012)
  • B.Sc., University of British Columbia, Microbiology & Immunology (2008)

Service, Volunteer and Community Work


  • Wikipedia Editor, Wikimedia Foundation (January 2007 - Present)

    Contributed to and/or edited several Wikipedia articles, participated in editing events at the main Wikimedia Foundation office, strived to promote Wikipedia at various events, for example by staffing Wikipedia booth at the Maker Faire.

    Location

    149 New Montgomery St, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA

  • Invited Mentor, Beyond B.Sc. Conference, University of British Columbia (March 2010 - March 2011)

    Shared experiences and strived to give good advice to the Life Sciences undergraduates at the University of British Columbia about post-graduate employment and study opportunities, as well as possible actions that could help them get there.

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

  • Performer, Living Lab Theater Troupe, University of British Columbia (January 2009 - May 2010)

    Performed the role of a teaching assistant in several interactive theater performances, participated in play development, completed several teacher training courses.

    Location

    1961 East Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1, Canada

  • Rollerblader, Vancouver Olympic Games Opening Ceremony, Winter Olympic Games 2010 (August 2009 - February 2010)

    As a volunteer performer at the Opening Ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver, participated in all rehearsals and the final performance. The role was to emulate an ice skater by rollerblading on a stadium stage covered by a white carpet representing ice. All rollerbladers lit up their red costumes towards the end of the piece, emulating fire that gave rise to the beautiful mountains of Canada.

    Location

    777 Pacific Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6B 4Y8, Canada

  • Organizing Member, World AIDS Day Organizing Committee, University of British Columbia (September 2008 - December 2009)

    Participated in organizing activities for the World AIDS Day on December 1, 2008 and 2009. Invited Dr. Julio Montaner, the President of the International AIDS Society, to give a keynote talk for the 2008 World AIDS Day at the University of British Columbia.

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

  • Graduation Coordinator, Microbiology and Immunology Student Association, University of British Columbia (March 2007 - May 2008)

    As an elected member of the Microbiology and Immunology Student Association, led organization of the graduation ceremony for the 2008 Microbiology and Immunology class, participated in fundraising activities, and contributed to other events aimed at helping other students succeed.

    Location

    6174 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A1, Canada

  • Green Genes Club Member, Genentech, Inc. (May 2007 - December 2007)

    Participated in meetings and club activities that aimed to improve environmental sustainability efforts at Genentech.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • Wellness Peer Educator, UBC Wellness Center, University of British Columbia (August 2004 - May 2006)

    Volunteered 5-10 hours per week at the University of British Columbia Wellness Center to help students with various wellness issues and/or questions (contraception methods, healthy eating, time management, environmental sustainability, etc.), completed all the necessary training courses and leadership exercises, participated in student reach-out events, such as poster sessions.

    Location

    6138 Student Union Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z7, Canada

Personal Interests


• Research: cancer immunotherapy, tumor immunology, immunological memory, oncolytic viruses, human immune system in health and disease, normal and cancer stem cells, circulating tumor cells, localized translation, translational control, technology development.
• Other: Editing Wikipedia, hiking, skiing, gymnastics, ballet.

Professional

Work Experience


  • Research Associate, Discovery Oncology, Genentech, Inc. (January 2013 - July 2013)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Kevin G. Leong.
    • Project: Identify potential strategies to target tumor-reinitiating cells in colorectal cancer by characterizing selected properties of tumor cells remaining after chemotherapy in orthotropic and subcutaneous xenograft models.
    • Outcome: By means of flow cytometry, FACS, high-throughput live-cell imaging, microfluidics, confocal microscopy, and tumor growth studies in mice, successfully analyzed cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, invasion, and tumor forming potential of specific colorectal cancer cell populations; the details of the project remain confidential until publication.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • Contractor, Discovery Oncology, Genentech, Inc. (January 2012 - January 2013)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Kevin G. Leong.
    • Project: Identify potential strategies to target tumor-reinitiating cells in colorectal cancer by characterizing selected properties of tumor cells remaining after chemotherapy in orthotropic and subcutaneous xenograft models.
    • Outcome: By means of flow cytometry, FACS, high-throughput live-cell imaging, microfluidics, confocal microscopy, and tumor growth studies in mice, successfully analyzed cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, invasion, and tumor forming potential of specific colorectal cancer cell populations; the details of the project remain confidential until publication.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • Intern, Discovery Oncology, Genentech, Inc. (June 2011 - January 2012)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Kevin G. Leong.
    • Project: Identify potential strategies to target tumor-reinitiating cells in colorectal cancer by characterizing selected properties of tumor cells remaining after chemotherapy in orthotropic and subcutaneous xenograft models.
    • Outcome: By means of flow cytometry, FACS, high-throughput live-cell imaging, microfluidics, confocal microscopy, and tumor growth studies in mice, successfully analyzed cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, invasion, and tumor forming potential of specific colorectal cancer cell populations; the details of the project remain confidential until publication.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • M.Sc. Student, Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia (August 2008 - June 2011)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Michael R. Gold.
    • Project: In order to facilitate the development of effective vaccines, characterize mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) in lymphocytes and determine if P-bodies play a role in immune memory by storing pre-synthesized effector mRNAs.
    • Outcome: Designed a protocol for dual analysis of proteins and/or mRNAs in lymphocytes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy; successfully completed the project and found that P-bodies in memory CD8+ T cells store IFN-γ mRNA; taught the “Introduction to Immunology” tutorial and received 2 nominations for a teaching award; served as a mentor to 4 undergraduate students; currently preparing a manuscript for publication.

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

  • Intern, Process Virology, Genentech, Inc. (May 2007 - December 2007)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Bin Yang.
    • Project: Establish the mechanism of virus removal during late stage purification of therapeutic antibodies to facilitate clinical trials of novel therapeutic antibodies in Europe.
    • Outcome: Identified the forces responsible for clearance of 3 model viruses by anion-exchange chromatography and found that electrostatic interactions are primarily responsible for removal of non-enveloped viruses, whereas non-electrostatic forces contribute to the clearance of the model enveloped virus; initiated a productive collaboration with GE Healthcare; organized a group picnic and a hike on the local Angel Island, which brought group members closer together.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • Intern, Medical Biophysics, British Columbia Cancer Research Center (January 2006 - August 2006)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Aly Karsan.
    • Project: Investigate the roles of heterotrimeric G proteins in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway of endothelial cells in order to identify potential drug targets in tumor angiogenesis and sepsis that are triggered by TLR4 signaling.
    • Outcome: Gathered experimental data supporting the role of two novel cytoplasmic proteins in the TLR4 signaling pathway of endothelial cells, created a scientific report, organized a group hike that increased positive attitude and team spirit.

    Location

    675 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada

  • Laboratory Assistant, Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia (April 2005 - June 2005)

    • Laboratory of Dr. Erin C. Gaynor.
    • Assisted with the analysis of various treatment options on biofilm formation by the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni.
    • Maintained the laboratory: prepared antibiotics, media plates, and buffers; autoclaved biohazard waste, glassware, and solutions; calibrated and cleaned laboratory devices and glassware.

    Location

    6174 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A1, Canada

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Biomarkers of Residual Disease, Disseminated Tumor Cells, and Metastases in the MMTV-PyMT Breast Cancer Model PLOS ONE Franci, C., Zhou, J., Jiang, Z., Modrusan, Z., Good, Z., Jackson, E., Kouros-Mehr, H. 2013; 8 (3)

    Abstract

    Cancer metastases arise in part from disseminated tumor cells originating from the primary tumor and from residual disease persisting after therapy. The identification of biomarkers on micro-metastases, disseminated tumors, and residual disease may yield novel tools for early detection and treatment of these disease states prior to their development into metastases and recurrent tumors. Here we describe the molecular profiling of disseminated tumor cells in lungs, lung metastases, and residual tumor cells in the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model. MMTV-PyMT mice were bred with actin-GFP mice, and focal hyperplastic lesions from pubertal MMTV-PyMT;actin-GFP mice were orthotopically transplanted into FVB/n mice to track single tumor foci. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with TAC chemotherapy (docetaxel, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide), and residual and relapsed tumor cells were sorted and profiled by mRNA microarray analysis. Data analysis revealed enrichment of the Jak/Stat pathway, Notch pathway, and epigenetic regulators in residual tumors. Stat1 was significantly up-regulated in a DNA-damage-resistant population of residual tumor cells, and a pre-existing Stat1 sub-population was identified in untreated tumors. Tumor cells from adenomas, carcinomas, lung disseminated tumor cells, and lung metastases were also sorted from MMTV-PyMT transplant mice and profiled by mRNA microarray. Whereas disseminated tumors cells appeared similar to carcinoma cells at the mRNA level, lung metastases were genotypically very different from disseminated cells and primary tumors. Lung metastases were enriched for a number of chromatin-modifying genes and stem cell-associated genes. Histone analysis of H3K4 and H3K9 suggested that lung metastases had been reprogrammed during malignant progression. These data identify novel biomarkers of residual tumor cells and disseminated tumor cells and implicate pathways that may mediate metastasis formation and tumor relapse after therapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0058183

    View details for Web of Science ID 000318679900052

    View details for PubMedID 23520493

  • Heterotrimeric G(i)/G(o) proteins modulate endothelial TLR signaling independent of the MyD88-dependent pathway AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-HEART AND CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY Dauphinee, S. M., Voelcker, V., Tebaykina, Z., Wong, F., Karsan, A. 2011; 301 (6): H2246-H2253

    Abstract

    The innate immune recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is mediated by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and results in activation of proinflammatory signaling including NF-?B and MAPK pathways. Heterotrimeric G proteins have been previously implicated in LPS signaling in macrophages and monocytes. In the present study, we show that pertussis toxin sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins (G?(i/o)) are involved in the activation of MAPK and Akt downstream of TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 in endothelial cells. G?(i/o) are also required for full activation of interferon signaling downstream of TLR3 and TLR4 but are not required for the activation of NF-?B. We find that G?(i/o)-mediated activation of the MAPK is independent of the canonical MyD88, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 signaling cascade in LPS-stimulated cells. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that heterotrimeric G proteins are widely involved in TLR pathways along a signaling cascade that is distinct from MyD88-TRAF6.

    View details for DOI 10.1152/ajpheart.01194.2010

    View details for Web of Science ID 000298325200009

    View details for PubMedID 21949112

  • Understanding the Mechanism of Virus Removal by Q Sepharose Fast Flow Chromatography During the Purification of CHO-Cell Derived Biotherapeutics BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING Strauss, D. M., Lute, S., Tebaykina, Z., Frey, D. D., Ho, C., Blank, G. S., Brorson, K., Chen, Q., Yang, B. 2009; 104 (2): 371-380

    Abstract

    During production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in mammalian cell culture, it is important to ensure that viral impurities and potential viral contaminants will be removed during downstream purification. Anion exchange chromatography provides a high degree of virus removal from mAb feedstocks, but the mechanism by which this is achieved has not been characterized. In this work, we have investigated the binding of three viruses to Q sepharose fast flow (QSFF) resin to determine the degree to which electrostatic interactions are responsible for viral clearance by this process. We first used a chromatofocusing technique to determine the isoelectric points of the viruses and established that they are negatively charged under standard QSFF conditions. We then determined that virus removal by this chromatography resin is strongly disrupted by the presence of high salt concentrations or by the absence of the positively charged Q ligand, indicating that binding of the virus to the resin is primarily due to electrostatic forces, and that any non-electrostatic interactions which may be present are not sufficient to provide virus removal. Finally, we determined the binding profile of a virus in a QSFF column after a viral clearance process. These data indicate that virus particles generally behave similarly to proteins, but they also illustrate the high degree of performance necessary to achieve several logs of virus reduction. Overall, this mechanistic understanding of an important viral clearance process provides the foundation for the development of science-based process validation strategies to ensure viral safety of biotechnology products.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/bit.22416

    View details for Web of Science ID 000269846900015

    View details for PubMedID 19575414

Presentations


  • Targeting tumor re-initiating cells in colorectal cancer (scientific talk)

    Zinaida Good, Ida Enquist, Erica L. Jackson, and Kevin G. Leong
    TRIC Group, Discovery Oncology Department, Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc.

    Presentation material is confidential.

    Time Period

    April 18, 2013

    Presented To

    Discovery Oncology Department Meeting at Genentech, Inc.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • Characterization of processing bodies in T and B lymphocytes (M.Sc. defense)

    CHARACTERIZATION OF PROCESSING BODIES IN T AND B LYMPHOCYTES

    by

    ZINAIDA TEBAYKINA

    B.Sc. The University of British Columbia, 2008

    A THESIS SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF

    MASTER OF SCIENCE

    in

    THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
    (Microbiology & Immunology)

    THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
    (Vancouver)

    April 2012

    © Zinaida Tebaykina, 2012

    ABSTRACT

    Processing bodies (P-bodies) are cytoplasmic aggregates that contain translationally-repressed mRNAs in complex with repressor proteins (GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a), facilitate mRNA storage or degradation, and can be identified by the αGW-body (GWB) serum that detects several P-body proteins. The partitioning of mRNAs between a translationally-competent cytoplasmic pool and a translationally-repressed P-body pool could be an important mechanism for dynamically controlling the synthesis of key proteins. Memory CD8+ T lymphocytes contain translationally-repressed RANTES and IFN-γ mRNAs, enabling the secretion of these cytokines within 30 minutes of T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Although P-bodies have not been characterized in lymphocytes, I hypothesized that storage of RANTES and IFN-γ mRNAs in P-bodies could contribute to the ability of memory CD8+ T cells to mount rapid recall responses. Using immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy, I established that T and B lymphocytes contain GWBs and express GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a, which are concentrated in cytoplasmic granules. Co-localization analysis identified multiple subsets of P-bodies, raising the possibility that P-bodies with different protein compositions have distinct functional properties. Moreover, I found that P-bodies partially dissociate and move towards the model immune synapse in both T and B lymphocytes. To explore the role of P-bodies in the recall response, I utilized the OT-I model to generate effector and memory CD8+ T lymphocytes in vitro. Compared to naïve CD8+ T cells from OT-I mice, effector T cells had elevated levels of P-body proteins and a greater number of P-bodies. In contrast, memory T cells had similar numbers of P-bodies as naïve T cells, but contained larger GWBs and RCK/p54 granules. Remarkably, RANTES mRNA did not co-localize with P-bodies in memory T cells, but was distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm. Conversely, IFN-γ mRNA co-localized with GWBs and RCK/p54 granules in memory T cells. The abundance of P-body-targeting AU-rich elements (AREs) in IFN-γ mRNA and the absence of AREs in RANTES mRNA suggests that IFN-γ mRNA transcribed following activation of naïve T cells, is directed for storage into GWB+ RCK/p54+ P-bodies to be reused during the recall response, whereas RANTES mRNA is stored by an undefined P-body-independent mechanism.

    Time Period

    April 16, 2012

    Presented To

    M.Sc. Thesis Defense, University of British Columbia

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

    For More Information:

  • Identification of colorectal tumor re-initiating cell niche (scientific talk)

    Zinaida Tebaykina, Ida Enquist, Erica L. Jackson, and Kevin G. Leong
    TRIC Group, Discovery Oncology Department, Research and Early Development, Genentech, Inc.

    Presentation material is confidential.

    Time Period

    November 25, 2011

    Presented To

    Colorectal Cancer Meeting, Genentech, Inc.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • How immune cells remember (speed poster presentation)

    Submitted abstract:

    The role of mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) in CD8+ memory T cells.

    Zinaida Tebaykina, Kate Choi, Lisa C. Osborne, Ninan Abraham, and Michael R. Gold
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) are cytoplasmic aggregates that contain translationally-repressed mRNAs, as well as repressor proteins, and facilitate miRNA-mediated mRNA storage or degradation. The partitioning of mRNAs between a translationally-competent cytoplasmic pool and a translationally-repressed P-body pool could be an important mechanism for dynamically controlling the synthesis of key proteins. Although P-bodies have not been characterized in lymphocytes, based on previous reports that memory CD8+ T cells contain high levels of spliced mRNA encoding the chemokine RANTES, and can secrete RANTES within 30 minutes of TCR engagement, we hypothesized that storage of spliced mRNAs in P-bodies could contribute to the ability of memory T cells to mount rapid recall responses. Using flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy, we found that murine and human T and B-cell lines, as well as primary murine T and B lymphocytes express the P-body markers GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a, and that these proteins concentrated in discrete cytoplasmic granules. Co-localization analysis showed that there are subsets of P-bodies with different protein compositions and potentially distinct functional properties. To explore the role of P-bodies in the recall response, we utilized the OT-I model to generate effector and memory CD8+ T cells in vitro. Compared to naïve CD8+ T cells from OT-I mice, effector T cells had elevated levels of P-body markers and a greater number of P-bodies. In contrast, memory T cells had similar numbers of P-bodies as naïve cells, but contained substantially larger RCK/p54 granules. Although memory T cells contained greater amount of RANTES mRNA than naïve cells, RANTES mRNA did not co-localize with P-bodies in memory cells. The exclusion of RANTES mRNAs from P-bodies in memory T cells may prevent the degradation of these pre-synthesized mRNAs and allow memory cells to rapidly secrete RANTES and initiate immune responses to secondary infection.

    Funding provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

    Time Period

    June 7, 2011

    Presented To

    ImmunoVancouver 2011 Conference at the University of British Columbia

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

    For More Information:

  • The role of mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) in CD8+ memory T cells (scientific talk and poster)

    Submitted abstract:

    The role of mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) in CD8+ memory T cells

    Zinaida Tebaykina, Kate Choi, Lisa C. Osborne, Ninan Abraham, and Michael R. Gold
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) are granular cytoplasmic aggregates that contain translationally-repressed mRNAs, as well as repressor proteins (GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a), and facilitate miRNA-mediated mRNA storage or degradation. The partitioning of mRNAs between a translationally-competent cytoplasmic pool and a translationally-repressed P-body pool could be an important mechanism for dynamically controlling the synthesis of key proteins. Although P-bodies have not been characterized in lymphocytes, we hypothesized that storage of spliced mRNAs in P-bodies could contribute to the ability of memory T cells to mount rapid recall responses and secrete cytokines within minutes of TCR engagement. Using flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy, we found that murine and human T and B-cell lines, as well as primary murine T and B lymphocytes express the P-body markers GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a, and that these proteins concentrated in discrete cytoplasmic granules. The levels of these proteins increased in response to antigen receptor-induced activation of the cells, and co-localization analysis showed that there are multiple subsets of P-bodies containing different combinations of the GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a proteins. This raises the possibility that P-bodies with different protein compositions have distinct functional properties. To explore the role of P-bodies in the recall response, we utilized the OT-I model to generate effector and memory CD8+ T cells in vitro. Compared to naïve CD8+ T cells from OT-I mice, effector T cells had elevated levels of P-body markers and a greater number of P-bodies. In contrast, memory T cells had similar numbers of P-bodies as naïve cells, but contained substantially larger RCK/p54 granules. Based on previous reports that memory CD8+ T cells contain high levels of spliced mRNA encoding the chemokine RANTES, and can secrete RANTES within 30 minutes of TCR engagement, we hypothesized that memory T cells store RANTES mRNA in P-bodies so that they can mount rapid recall responses. Although memory T cells contained greater amount of RANTES mRNA than naïve cells, RANTES mRNA did not co-localize with P-bodies in memory cells, and instead was more frequently associated with P-bodies in naïve cells. The exclusion of RANTES mRNAs from P-bodies in memory T cells may prevent the degradation of these pre-synthesized mRNAs and allow memory cells to rapidly secrete RANTES and initiate immune responses to secondary infection.

    Funding provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

    Time Period

    April 10, 2011

    Presented To

    Canadian Society for Immunology 2011 Meeting at the Chateau Lake Louise

    Location

    111 Lake Louise Dr, Lake Louise, AB T0L 1E0, Canada

    For More Information:

  • The role of mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) in CD8+ memory T cells (scientific talk)

    Submitted abstract:

    The role of mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) in CD8+ memory T cells

    Zinaida Tebaykina, Kate Choi, Lisa C. Osborne, Ninan Abraham, and Michael R. Gold
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies) are cytoplasmic aggregates that contain translationally-repressed mRNAs, as well as repressor proteins, and facilitate miRNA-mediated mRNA storage or degradation. Although P-bodies have not been characterized in lymphocytes, based on previous reports that memory CD8+ T cells contain high levels of spliced mRNA encoding the chemokine RANTES, and can secrete RANTES within 30 minutes of TCR engagement, we hypothesized that storage of spliced mRNAs in P-bodies could contribute to the ability of memory T cells to mount rapid recall responses. Using flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy, we found that murine and human T and B-cell lines, as well as primary murine T and B lymphocytes express the P-body markers GW182, RCK/p54, and DCP1a, and that these proteins concentrated in discrete cytoplasmic granules. Co-localization analysis showed that there are subsets of P-bodies with different protein compositions and potentially distinct functional properties. To explore the role of P-bodies in the recall response, we utilized the OT-I model to generate effector and memory CD8+ T cells in vitro. Compared to naïve CD8+ T cells from OT-I mice, effector T cells had elevated levels of P-body markers and a greater number of P-bodies. In contrast, memory T cells had similar numbers of P-bodies as naïve cells, but contained substantially larger RCK/p54 granules. Although memory T cells contained greater amount of RANTES mRNA than naïve cells, RANTES mRNA did not co-localize with P-bodies in memory cells. The exclusion of RANTES mRNAs from P-bodies in memory T cells may prevent the degradation of these pre-synthesized mRNAs and allow memory cells to rapidly secrete RANTES and initiate immune responses to secondary infection.

    Time Period

    March 11, 2011

    Presented To

    Life Sciences Institute Graduate Student Association Research Day 2011 at the University of British Columbia

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

    For More Information:

  • Finding the Achilles’ heel of an incurable cancer: the role of the Rap GTPases in multiple myeloma homing and pathogenesis (poster presentation)

    Poster details:

    Finding the Achilles’ heel of an incurable cancer: the role of the Rap GTPases in multiple myeloma homing and pathogenesis

    Zinaida Tebaykina and Michael R. Gold
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

    Funding provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

    Time Period

    March 13, 2009

    Presented To

    Life Sciences Institute Graduate Student Association Research Day 2009 at the University of British Columbia

    Location

    2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada

    For More Information:

  • Understanding viral clearance: mechanism of virus interaction with the QSFF chromatography resin (scientific talk)

    Zinaida Tebaykina, Daniel M. Strauss, Qi Chen, and Bin Yang
    Process Virology Group, Late Stage Purification Department, Process Research and Development, Genentech, Inc.

    Presentation material is confidential.

    Time Period

    December 5, 2007

    Presented To

    Presentation to the PR&D vice president and senior staff at Genentech, Inc.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

  • Understanding virus safety: mechanism of virus interaction with the Q-Sepharose Fast Flow chromatography resin (poster presentation)

    Zinaida Tebaykina, Daniel M. Strauss, Qi Chen, and Bin Yang
    Process Virology Group, Late Stage Purification Department, Process Research and Development, Genentech, Inc.

    Presentation material is confidential.

    Time Period

    August 9, 2007

    Presented To

    Summer intern poster day at Genentech, Inc.

    Location

    1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

Stanford Medicine Resources: