Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pulmonary Disease

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Critical Care Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2011)
  • Board Certification: Pulmonary Disease, American Board of Internal Medicine (2010)
  • Medical Education:University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (05/2003) PA
  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh (2003)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University Division of PCCM (06/2010) CA
  • Residency:Brown University Hospitals (06/2006) RI
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2006)
  • Board Certification, Pulmonary Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2010)

Research & Scholarship

Lab Affiliations


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Promotion of airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and alleviation of airway ischemia by deferoxamine nanoparticles. Biomaterials Jiang, X., Malkovskiy, A. V., Tian, W., Sung, Y. K., Sun, W., Hsu, J. L., Manickam, S., Wagh, D., Joubert, L., Semenza, G. L., Rajadas, J., Nicolls, M. R. 2014; 35 (2): 803-813

    Abstract

    Airway tissue ischemia and hypoxia in human lung transplantation is a consequence of the sacrifice of the bronchial circulation during the surgical procedure and is a major risk factor for the development of airway anastomotic complications. Augmented expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α promotes microvascular repair and alleviates allograft ischemia and hypoxia. Deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) is an FDA-approved iron chelator which has been shown to upregulate cellular HIF-1α. Here, we developed a nanoparticle formulation of DFO that can be topically applied to airway transplants at the time of surgery. In a mouse orthotopic tracheal transplant (OTT) model, the DFO nanoparticle was highly effective in enhancing airway microvascular perfusion following transplantation through the production of the angiogenic factors, placental growth factor (PLGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1. The endothelial cells in DFO treated airways displayed higher levels of p-eNOS and Ki67, less apoptosis, and decreased production of perivascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to vehicle-treated airways. In summary, a DFO formulation topically-applied at the time of surgery successfully augmented airway anastomotic microvascular regeneration and the repair of alloimmune-injured microvasculature. This approach may be an effective topical transplant-conditioning therapy for preventing airway complications following clinical lung transplantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2013.09.092

    View details for PubMedID 24161166

  • Blocking Macrophage Leukotriene B-4 Prevents Endothelial Injury and Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE Tian, W., Jiang, X., Tamosiuniene, R., Sung, Y. K., Qian, J., Dhillon, G., Gera, L., Farkas, L., Rabinovitch, M., Zamanian, R. T., Inayathullah, M., Fridlib, M., Rajadas, J., Peters-Golden, M., Voelkel, N. F., Nicolls, M. R. 2013; 5 (200)
  • A case of recurrent pericardial constriction presenting with severe pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary circulation Brunner, N. W., Ramachandran, K., Kudelko, K. T., Sung, Y. K., Spiekerkoetter, E., Yang, P. C., Zamanian, R. T., Perez, V. d. 2013; 3 (2): 436-439

    Abstract

    Chronic constrictive pericarditis (CP) is a relatively rare condition in which the pericardium becomes fibrotic and noncompliant, eventually resulting in heart failure due to impaired ventricular filling. The only curative treatment is pericardiectomy. Classically, CP does not usually cause severe pulmonary hypertension. When attempting to differentiate CP from restrictive cardiomyopathy, the presence of severely elevated pulmonary arterial pressure is used as a diagnostic criterion ruling against CP. We present a case of proven recurrent pericardial constriction following pericardiectomy presenting with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    View details for DOI 10.4103/2045-8932.114780

    View details for PubMedID 24015347

  • A brief overview of mouse models of pulmonary arterial hypertension: problems and prospects AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-LUNG CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR PHYSIOLOGY Gomez-Arroyo, J., Saleem, S. J., Mizuno, S., Syed, A. A., Bogaard, H. J., Abbate, A., Taraseviciene-Stewart, L., Sung, Y., Kraskauskas, D., Farkas, D., Conrad, D. H., Nicolls, M. R., Voelkel, N. F. 2012; 302 (10): L977-L991

    Abstract

    Many chronic pulmonary diseases are associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling, which is a term that continues to be used to describe a wide spectrum of vascular abnormalities. Pulmonary vascular structural changes frequently increase pulmonary vascular resistance, causing PH and right heart failure. Although rat models had been standard models of PH research, in more recent years the availability of genetically engineered mice has made this species attractive for many investigators. Here we review a large amount of data derived from experimental PH reports published since 1996. These studies using wild-type and genetically designed mice illustrate the challenges and opportunities provided by these models. Hemodynamic measurements are difficult to obtain in mice, and right heart failure has not been investigated in mice. Anatomical, cellular, and genetic differences distinguish mice and rats, and pharmacogenomics may explain the degree of PH and the particular mode of pulmonary vascular adaptation and also the response of the right ventricle.

    View details for DOI 10.1152/ajplung.00362.2011

    View details for Web of Science ID 000304357600001

    View details for PubMedID 22307907

  • Regulatory T Cells Limit Vascular Endothelial Injury and Prevent Pulmonary Hypertension CIRCULATION RESEARCH Tamosiuniene, R., Tian, W., Dhillon, G., Wang, L., Sung, Y. K., Gera, L., Patterson, A. J., Agrawal, R., Rabinovitch, M., Ambler, K., Long, C. S., Voelkel, N. F., Nicolls, M. R. 2011; 109 (8): 867-U120

    Abstract

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an incurable disease associated with viral infections and connective tissue diseases. The relationship between inflammation and disease pathogenesis in these disorders remains poorly understood.To determine whether immune dysregulation due to absent T-cell populations directly contributes to the development of PAH.Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) blockade induced significant pulmonary endothelial apoptosis in T-cell-deficient rats but not in immune-reconstituted (IR) rats. T cell-lymphopenia in association with VEGFR2 blockade resulted in periarteriolar inflammation with macrophages, and B cells even prior to vascular remodeling and elevated pulmonary pressures. IR prevented early inflammation and attenuated PAH development. IR with either CD8 T cells alone or with CD4-depleted spleen cells was ineffective in preventing PAH, whereas CD4-depleting immunocompetent euthymic animals increased PAH susceptibility. IR with either CD4(+)CD25(hi) or CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell subsets prior to vascular injury attenuated the development of PAH. IR limited perivascular inflammation and endothelial apoptosis in rat lungs in association with increased FoxP3(+), IL-10- and TGF-?-expressing CD4 cells, and upregulation of pulmonary bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2)-expressing cells, a receptor that activates endothelial cell survival pathways.PAH may arise when regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity fails to control endothelial injury. These studies suggest that regulatory T cells normally function to limit vascular injury and may protect against the development of PAH.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.110.236927

    View details for Web of Science ID 000295368300008

    View details for PubMedID 21868697

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