Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Co-Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory (2005 - Present)
  • Assistant Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory (1999 - 2004)

Honors & Awards


  • FAHA, American Heart Association (2008)
  • FACC, American College of Cardiology (2005)

Professional Education


  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, Stanford University, CA (1998)
  • Fellowship, Kobe General Hospital, Japan (1995)
  • Residency, Kobe General Hospital, Japan (1992)
  • Medical Education (MD), Kyoto University, Japan (1990)

Community and International Work


  • International Editorial Board: Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • International Working Group on Intracoronary OCT Standardization and Validation

    Topic

    Optical Coherence Tomography

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis of Small Vessel Lesions Treated with the Sparrow Coronary Stent System: Results of the CARE II Trial CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Kume, T., Waseda, K., Koo, B., Yock, P. G., Botelho, R., Verheye, S., Whitbourn, R., Meredith, I., Worthley, S., Hai, K. T., Honda, Y., Abizaid, A., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2014; 83 (1): 19-24

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the Sparrow sirolimus-eluting stent (Sparrow-SES) against the Sparrow bare-metal stent (Sparrow-BMS) and conventional balloon-expandable bare-metal stent (BMS: Driver/Micro-Driver(®) stent, Medtronic Vascular, Santa Rosa, CA). BACKGROUND: The Sparrow(®) stent (Biosensors International, Singapore) consists of a guide wire-based, self-expandable, ultra-thin nitinol stent. The performance of this device with sirolimus in a fully biodegradable polymer has not been determined. METHODS: A total of 74 patients were included in this intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) sub-study of the CARE II trial, which was a prospective, randomized, multicenter trial in the treatment of single de novo native coronary artery lesions in vessels ranging from 2.0 mm to 2.75 mm in diameter (Sparrow-SES: n = 31, Sparrow-BMS: n = 22, BMS: n = 21). RESULTS: Stent volume index (VI) was significantly increased 8-month later in Sparrow-SES and Sparrow-BMS, but not in BMS (4.0±1.0 to 4.6±1.0 mm(3) /mm, p<0.0001, 4.0±0.6 to 4.4±0.8 mm(3) /mm, p<0.05, and 5.2±1.0 to 5.1±0.9 mm(3) /mm, p=0.421, respectively). % neointimal obstruction in Sparrow-SES was significantly smaller than those in Sparrow-BMS and BMS at follow-up (17.6±9.4 vs. 36.2±13.8 and 39.9±11.1%, p<0.001). Sparrow-SES showed a mean 15% stent expansion and good suppression of neointimal proliferation, resulting in a significantly lower percentage of change in lumen VI during follow-up period (Sparrow-SES: -6.2±16.2%, Sparrow-BMS: -30.4±11.6%, BMS: -40.4±10.0%, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The self-expanding Sparrow-SES demonstrated chronic stent expansion, good suppression of neointimal proliferation and resulted in a more preserved lumen in stented small vessels compared with the Sparrow-BMS and conventional balloon expandable BMS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.24867

    View details for Web of Science ID 000328631400007

    View details for PubMedID 23413202

  • Peri-stent contrast staining and very late stent thrombosis after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation: an observation from the RESTART (REgistry of Stent Thrombosis for review And Re-evaluaTion) angiographic substudy. EuroIntervention Kozuma, K., Kimura, T., Suzuki, N., Miyazawa, A., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Morimoto, T., Aizawa, T., Mitsudo, K., Miyazaki, S., Yamaguchi, T., Isshiki, T. 2013; 9 (7): 831-840

    Abstract

    Aims: The aim of the study was to clarify the angiographic characteristics of stent thrombosis (ST) in relation to sirolimus-eluting stents (SES). Methods and results: RESTART is a Japanese registry of SES-associated ST. As an angiographic substudy, coronary angiograms at baseline, at six to 12 months and at the time of ST were analysed. Angiograms of 313 patients (early ST [EST] 169 patients, late ST [LST] 59 patients, and very late ST [VLST] 85 patients) were investigated. Residual dissection post procedure was more frequently seen in the EST group. Stent fracture was more frequently seen in the VLST group than in the EST and LST groups (16.5%, 3.0%, and 3.4%, respectively; p<0.001). Peri-stent contrast staining (PSS), defined as contrast staining outside the stent contour extending to ≥20% of the stent diameter, was remarkably more prevalent in the VLST group than in the EST and LST groups (34.1%, 4.7%, and 6.8%, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions: Abnormal angiographic findings such as PSS and stent fracture were found significantly more frequently in lesions with VLST than in lesions with EST and LST.

    View details for DOI 10.4244/EIJV9I7A137

    View details for PubMedID 23410581

  • Variability in quantitative and qualitative analysis of intravascular ultrasound and frequency domain optical coherence tomography CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Abnousi, F., Waseda, K., Kume, T., Otake, H., Kawarada, O., Yong, C. M., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y., Yeung, A. C., Fearon, W. F. 2013; 82 (3): E192-E199

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.24871

    View details for Web of Science ID 000323454100008

  • Duplex criteria for in-stent restenosis in the superficial femoral artery CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Kawarada, O., Higashimori, A., Noguchi, M., Waratani, N., Yoshida, M., Fujihara, M., Yokoi, Y., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2013; 81 (4): E199-E205

    Abstract

    To elucidate the optimal cutoff and accuracy of duplex ultrasonography (DUS) parameters for in-stent restenosis (ISR) after nitinol stenting in the superficial femoral artery (SFA).Few data are available regarding the performance of DUS for binary ISR based on quantitative vessel analysis (QVA) in the era of SFA nitinol stenting.This retrospective study included 74 in-stent stenoses of SFA who underwent DUS before follow-up angiography. DUS parameters, such as peak systolic velocity (PSV) and the peak systolic velocity ratio (PSVR), were compared with percent diameter stenosis (%DS) from a QVA basis.There was a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.001) between "%DS and PSV" and "%DS and PSVR," and the correlation with %DS proved to be stronger in PSVR (R = 0.720) than in PSV (R = 0.672). The best performing parameter for ISR (50% or greater stenosis) was revealed PSVR, as the areas under the receiver operator characteristics curves using PSVR and PSV were 0.908 and 0.832, respectively. A PSVR cut off value of 2.85 yielded the best predictive value with sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 84%, and accuracy of 86%. The positive predictive value was 85% and the negative predictive value was 88%.A PSVR of 2.85 is the optimal threshold for ISR after nitinol stenting in the SFA. Further large prospective studies are required for the validation and establishment of uniform criteria for DUS parameters.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.24509

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315416600004

    View details for PubMedID 22639187

  • Improved automated lumen contour detection by novel multifrequency processing algorithm with current intravascular ultrasound system CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Kume, T., Kim, B., Waseda, K., Sathyanarayana, S., Li, W., Teo, T., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2013; 81 (3): E173-E177

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new fully automated lumen border tracing system based on a novel multifrequency processing algorithm.We developed the multifrequency processing method to enhance arterial lumen detection by exploiting the differential scattering characteristics of blood and arterial tissue. The implementation of the method can be integrated into current intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) hardware.This study was performed in vivo with conventional 40-MHz IVUS catheters (Atlantis SR Pro™, Boston Scientific Corp, Natick, MA) in 43 clinical patients with coronary artery disease. A total of 522 frames were randomly selected, and lumen areas were measured after automatically tracing lumen borders with the new tracing system and a commercially available tracing system (TraceAssist™) referred to as the "conventional tracing system." The data assessed by the two automated systems were compared with the results of manual tracings by experienced IVUS analysts.New automated lumen measurements showed better agreement with manual lumen area tracings compared with those of the conventional tracing system (correlation coefficient: 0.819 vs. 0.509). When compared against manual tracings, the new algorithm also demonstrated improved systematic error (mean difference: 0.13 vs. -1.02 mm(2) ) and random variability (standard deviation of difference: 2.21 vs. 4.02 mm(2) ) compared with the conventional tracing system.This preliminary study showed that the novel fully automated tracing system based on the multifrequency processing algorithm can provide more accurate lumen border detection than current automated tracing systems and thus, offer a more reliable quantitative evaluation of lumen geometry.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.23274

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315339400004

    View details for PubMedID 21805600

  • Variability in quantitative and qualitative analysis of intravascular ultrasound and frequency domain optical coherence tomography. Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions Abnousi, F., Waseda, K., Kume, T., Otake, H., Kawarada, O., Yong, C. M., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y., Yeung, A. C., Fearon, W. F. 2013

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is an intravascular imaging technique now available in the United States. However, the importance of level of training required for analysis using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and FD-OCT is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate inter- and intra-observer variability between expert and beginner analysts interpreting IVUS and FD-OCT images. METHODS AND RESULTS: Two independent expert analysts and two independent beginner analysts evaluated a total of 226?±?2 stent cross-sections with IVUS and 232?±?2 stent cross-sections with FD-OCT in 14 patients after stenting. Inter- and intra-observer variability for determining stent volume index (VI), as well as identifying incomplete stent apposition and dissection were assessed. The inter- and intra-observer variability of stent VI was minimal for both beginner and expert analysts regardless of imaging technology (random variability: 0.38 vs. 0.05 mm(3) /mm for IVUS, 0.26 vs. 0.08 mm(3) /mm for FD-OCT). Although qualitative IVUS analysis at the patient level revealed no significant difference between beginners and experts, this was not the case for FD-OCT. The number of overall qualitative findings noted by beginner and expert analysts were more variable (overestimated or underestimated) with FD-OCT. CONCLUSION: Despite varying levels of training, the increased resolution of FD-OCT compared to IVUS provides better detection and less variability in quantitative image analysis. On the contrary, this increased resolution not only increases the rate but also the variability of detection of qualitative image analysis, especially for beginner analysts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    View details for PubMedID 23412754

  • Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Vessel Response in the Drug-Eluting Stent Era Pooled Volumetric Intravascular Ultrasound Analyses CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Sakata, K., Waseda, K., Kume, T., Otake, H., Nakatani, D., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2012; 5 (6): 763-771

    Abstract

    Exaggerated neointimal hyperplasia is considered as the primary mechanism for increased restenosis in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) treated with bare-metal stent. However, the vessel response in DM and non-DM treated with different drug-eluting stents (DES) has not been systematically evaluated.We investigated 3D intravascular ultrasound (postprocedure and 6 to 9 months) in 971 patients (267 with DM and 704 without DM) treated with sirolimus- (n=104), paclitaxel- (n=303), zotarolimus- (n=391), or everolimus- (n=173) eluting stents. Volumetric data were standardized by length as volume index (VI). At postprocedure, lumen VI at the stented segment was significantly smaller in DM than in non-DM, whereas vessel VI was similar between the 2 groups. At follow-up, neointimal obstruction and maximum cross-sectional narrowing (neointimal area/stent area) were not significantly different between the 2 groups with no interaction for the DES type. Consequently, lumen VI was smaller in DM than in non-DM at follow-up. In the reference segments, residual plaque burden at postprocedure was significantly greater in DM than in non-DM, although change in lumen VI was similar between the 2 groups. The arterial responses at the reference segments also showed no interaction for the DES type.DM and non-DM lesions showed similar vessel response in both in-stent and reference segments regardless of the DES type. In the DES era, the follow-up lumen in DM patients seems to be determined primarily by the smaller lumen at postprocedure rather than exaggerated neointima within the stent or plaque proliferation at the reference segments.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.111.962878

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313576500014

    View details for PubMedID 23149332

  • Predictors of adverse clinical outcomes after successful infrapopliteal intervention CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Kawarada, O., Fujihara, M., Higashimori, A., Yokoi, Y., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2012; 80 (5): 861-871

    Abstract

    To clarify the clinical and angiographical variables related to delayed wound healing, major amputation and death after successful infrapopliteal intervention in critical limb ischemia patients with tissue loss.There is an underappreciation of adverse clinical outcomes after successful infrapopliteal intervention.Stent-assisted infrapopliteal angioplasty was successful in 106 limbs in 85 patients. Successful intervention was defined as revascularization of at least one straight-line flow to the foot.At 6 months and 1, 2, and 5 years, the repeat intervention-free rates were 55.0, 49.6, 44.4, and 36.1%, respectively; the amputation-free survival rates were 85.7, 68.0, 54.5, and 39.8%, respectively; and the limb salvage rates were 96.0, 92.4, 86.3, and 86.3%, respectively. An infectious wound was an independent predictor of major amputation after successful intervention. The complete wound healing rates were 36.8, 57.5, 67.9, and 73.6% at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, respectively. In stepwise multivariate Cox analysis, diabetes mellitus, an infectious wound, and the pedal arch classification were identified as independent predictors of wound healing. The long-term survival rates at 6 months and 1, 2, and 5 years were 89.5, 73.8, 62.0, and 43.4%, respectively. Stepwise multivariate Cox analysis indentified end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis to be an independent predictor of death.An infectious wound, comorbidities of diabetes mellitus and ESRD on hemodialysis and classification of pedal arch can be predictors of adverse clinical outcomes after successful infrapopliteal intervention.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.24370

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310472300029

    View details for PubMedID 22431493

  • Comparison of vascular response to the everolimus-eluting stent versus the paclitaxel-eluting stent: intravascular ultrasound results from the SPIRIT III trial EUROINTERVENTION Yamasaki, M., Tsujino, I., Lima-Filho, M. O., Ako, J., Shimohama, T., Hasegawa, T., Sakurai, R., Sudhir, K., Stone, G. W., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2012; 8 (6): 724-731

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vascular response of the everolimus-eluting stent (EES) compared with the paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).Data were obtained from the SPIRIT III trial, a multicentre, 2:1 randomised, controlled study comparing EES and PES in de novo native coronary artery lesions. IVUS images were eligible for volumetric analysis at eight-month follow-up in 158 lesions (EES: 113, PES: 45). At eight months, EES had a smaller neointimal volume index (VI: mm3/mm) (EES: 0.4±0.4 vs. PES: 0.8±0.8 mm3/mm, p=0.002) and also a smaller % neointimal obstruction (EES: 7.1±6.7% vs. PES: 11.1±10.5%, p=0.005) compared with PES. While there was no significant change in vessel VI with EES, there was a significant increase in vessel VI in PES during eight-month follow-up (EES: 0.1±1.2 vs. PES: 1.2±0.8 mm3/mm, p=0.001). There were no statistical differences in the frequency of edge dissection or incomplete stent apposition between the two groups.Detailed IVUS analysis confirmed significantly less neointimal hyperplasia with EES compared with PES. While there was no increase in vessel volume with EES during the eight-month follow-up period, vessel enlargement was seen at the stented segment in PES.

    View details for DOI 10.4244/EIJV8I6A112

    View details for Web of Science ID 000312043500014

    View details for PubMedID 23086791

  • Intravascular Ultrasound Comparison of Small Coronary Lesions Between Novel Guidewire-Based Sirolimus-Eluting Stents and Conventional Sirolimus-Eluting Stents JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Kume, T., Waseda, K., Koo, B., Botelho, R., Verheye, S., Whitbourn, R., Meredith, I., Worthley, S., Hai, K. T., Yock, P. G., Azevedo de Oliveira, F. R., Abizaid, A., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2012; 24 (10): 489-493

    Abstract

    The Sparrow stent system (Biosensors International) consists of a self-expanding, ultra-thin nitinol stent mounted within a 0.014? guidewire designed for small or tortuous coronary lesions. We compared the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) findings between the novel self-expanding sirolimus-eluting stent (Sparrow-SES) and a conventional balloon-expandable sirolimus-eluting stent (Cypher-SES) in patients with small coronary disease.We examined 14 lesions treated with the Sparrow-SES from CARE II, compared with 22 small vessel lesions treated with Cypher-SES. IVUS examination was performed post-procedure and 8 months later. Volumetric data were standardized by length as volume index (VI; mm³/mm).While baseline stent VI trended smaller in Sparrow-SES, follow-up stent VI became similar between the 2 groups due to a significant increase of stent VI in self-expanding Sparrow-SES during the follow-up period. At 8 months, Sparrow-SES showed greater neointima than Cypher-SES (0.8 ± 0.6 mm³/mm vs 0.2 ± 0.2 mm³/mm; P<.001). However, the decrease in lumen VI was only 0.3 ± 0.7 mm³/mm in Sparrow-SES, as compared to 0.1 ± 0.3 mm³/mm in Cypher-SES (P=.259), since the late loss due to neointimal hyperplasia was partly counterbalanced by the chronic stent expansion in Sparrow-SES.While 8-month follow-up of Sparrow-SES revealed greater amounts of neointimal hyperplasia compared with conventional Cypher-SES, chronic stent expansion preserved the lumen by increasing stent volume. This novel, guidewire-based, self-expanding stent system designed to be delivered through complex anatomies may be useful to treat patients with small-caliber coronary lesions by offering sufficient lumen preservation at follow-up.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000311028600014

    View details for PubMedID 23043031

  • Mid-Term Results of Everolimus-Eluting Stent in a Japanese Population Compared With a US Randomized Cohort: SPIRIT III Japan Registry With Harmonization by Doing JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Saito, S., Nakamura, S., Fujii, K., Nakamura, M., Isshiki, T., Hirayama, H., Kikuchi, T., Fujita, H., Nonogi, H., Mitsudo, K., Kimura, T., Igarashi, K., Saito, K., Lansky, A. J., Stone, G. W., Honda, Y., Waseda, K., Fitzgerald, P. J., Sudhir, K. 2012; 24 (9): 444-450

    Abstract

    To address safety concerns with first-generation drug-eluting stents (DESs), the everolimus-eluting stent (EES) has been developed as a second-generation DES. The study aim was to: (1) demonstrate that use of the EES in Japanese patients is non-inferior to use of the paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) in US patients; and (2) compare vessel response to the EES in Japanese vs US patients.The SPIRIT III Japan Registry, a prospective single-arm multicenter study was a part of the SPIRIT III global clinical program using harmonization by doing. The primary endpoint was in-segment late loss at 8 months, compared to US PES.A total of 88 subjects were enrolled in the Japan EES group. Angiographic in-segment late loss was significantly less in Japan EES vs US PES (0.15 ± 0.34 mm vs 0.28 ± 0.48 mm, respectively; P=.0185; Pnon-inferio r<.0001), while target vessel failure (TVF; 8.0% vs 9.9%) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 9 months (5.7% vs 8.8%) were not significantly different between the 2 groups. No differences were observed between Japan and US EES populations in terms of late loss, TVF, or MACE. Neointimal volume and postprocedural incomplete stent apposition rate were lower in Japan EES vs US EES/PES.The SPIRIT III Japan Registry met the primary endpoint of lower late loss in the Japan EES group vs the US PES group, with comparable results for EES between the Japanese and US patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310543300016

    View details for PubMedID 22954564

  • Evaluation of the peri-strut low intensity area following sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stents implantation: Insights from an optical coherence tomography study in humans INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Otake, H., Shite, J., Ikeno, F., Shinke, T., Teramoto, T., Miyoshi, N., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J., Hirata, K. 2012; 157 (1): 38-42

    Abstract

    Recent pathological studies have demonstrated that peri-strut low intensity area (PLIA) seen on optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging represents the presence of fibrinogen and/or extracellular matrix. We sought to assess the clinical prevalence of PLIA and its relation to neointimal proliferation after the implantation of sirolimus- (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) in humans.Seventy patients underwent 6-months follow-up OCT after SES (43 stents) or PES (37 stents) implantation. PLIA was defined as a region around stent struts with homogenous lower intensity than surrounding tissue on OCT images without signal attenuation. The incidence of stent struts with PLIA (+PLIA struts) was calculated as the number of +PLIA struts/number of all struts (%).PES showed a higher incidence of stents with PLIA than SES (86% vs. 58%; p=0.005) with a higher prevalence of +PLIA struts (27.8±21.9% vs. 10.9±11.0%; p=0.0008). SES with PLIA showed a significantly greater neointimal thickness (NIT) than SES without PLIA (p=0.02), while PES showed a similar tendency (p=0.19). In a detailed strut basis analysis, average NIT on +PLIA struts were significantly greater than that on -PLIA struts in both SES and PES. In addition, average NIT was positively correlated with the prevalence of +PLIA struts (SES: Rho=0.73; p<0.0001, PES: Rho=0.58, p=0.0005) in both stents.The prevalence of PLIA was significantly higher in PES than in SES. The presence and extent of PLIA might be associated with intimal thickening after 1st-generation DES implantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2010.11.006

    View details for Web of Science ID 000303206800015

    View details for PubMedID 21168926

  • Consensus Standards for Acquisition, Measurement, and Reporting of Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography Studies A Report From the International Working Group for Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography Standardization and Validation JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Tearney, G. J., Regar, E., Akasaka, T., Adriaenssens, T., Barlis, P., Bezerra, H. G., Bouma, B., Bruining, N., Cho, J., Chowdhary, S., Costa, M. A., de Silva, R., Dijkstra, J., Di Mario, C., Dudeck, D., Falk, E., Feldman, M. D., Fitzgerald, P., Garcia, H., Gonzalo, N., Granada, J. F., Guagliumi, G., Holm, N. R., Honda, Y., Ikeno, F., Kawasaki, M., Kochman, J., Koltowski, L., Kubo, T., Kume, T., Kyono, H., Lam, C. C., Lamouche, G., Lee, D. P., Leon, M. B., Maehara, A., Manfrini, O., Mintz, G. S., Mizuno, K., Morel, M., Nadkarni, S., Okura, H., Otake, H., Pietrasik, A., Prati, F., Raeber, L., Radu, M. D., Rieber, J., Riga, M., Rollins, A., Rosenberg, M., Sirbu, V., Serruys, P. W., Shimada, K., Shinke, T., Shite, J., Siegel, E., Sonada, S., Suter, M., Takarada, S., Tanaka, A., Terashima, M., Troels, T., Uemura, S., Ughi, G. J., van Beusekom, H. M., van der Steen, A. F., van Es, G., Van Soest, G., Virmani, R., Waxman, S., Weissman, N. J., Weisz, G. 2012; 59 (12): 1058-1072

    Abstract

    The purpose of this document is to make the output of the International Working Group for Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (IWG-IVOCT) Standardization and Validation available to medical and scientific communities, through a peer-reviewed publication, in the interest of improving the diagnosis and treatment of patients with atherosclerosis, including coronary artery disease.Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is a catheter-based modality that acquires images at a resolution of ~10 ?m, enabling visualization of blood vessel wall microstructure in vivo at an unprecedented level of detail. IVOCT devices are now commercially available worldwide, there is an active user base, and the interest in using this technology is growing. Incorporation of IVOCT in research and daily clinical practice can be facilitated by the development of uniform terminology and consensus-based standards on use of the technology, interpretation of the images, and reporting of IVOCT results.The IWG-IVOCT, comprising more than 260 academic and industry members from Asia, Europe, and the United States, formed in 2008 and convened on the topic of IVOCT standardization through a series of 9 national and international meetings.Knowledge and recommendations from this group on key areas within the IVOCT field were assembled to generate this consensus document, authored by the Writing Committee, composed of academicians who have participated in meetings and/or writing of the text.This document may be broadly used as a standard reference regarding the current state of the IVOCT imaging modality, intended for researchers and clinicians who use IVOCT and analyze IVOCT data.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2011.09.079

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301443000003

    View details for PubMedID 22421299

  • Intravascular ultrasound insights from the Cobalt Chromium Stent With Antiproliferative for Restenosis II (COSTAR II) trial comparing CoStar and Taxus paclitaxel-eluting stents. Cardiovascular revascularization medicine : including molecular interventions Tsujino, I., Koizumi, T., Shimohama, T., Ako, J., Waseda, K., Krucoff, M., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2012; 13 (2): 111-118

    Abstract

    Dedicated IVUS analyses of the second CObalt chromium STent with Antiproliferative for Restenosis (COSTAR II) trial have not been documented. We aim to compare IVUS findings between CoStar paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) and Taxus PES in patients enrolled in the COSTAR II trial. We also attempted to examine the possible regional impact of multiple stenting.Among the 1700 patients enrolled, 238 were assigned to an IVUS cohort including 168 patients treated by provisional multiple stenting. At 9 months, qualitative and quantitative IVUS observations including incomplete stent apposition (ISA) and neointimal proliferation (neointimal obstruction: neointimal volume/stent volume ×100) were compared between CoStar and Taxus PESs.In qualitative analysis, late-acquired ISA was observed in 1 patient treated by Taxus PES. Impaired strut continuity suggestive of stent fracture was observed in 2 out of 33 patients treated by multiple CoStar, and 4 out of 21 patients treated by multiple Taxus (P=.14). No such findings were found in single-stented patients in either stent subset. Quantitative analysis showed greater neointimal obstruction in CoStar (19.7%±13.4%, n=52) than in Taxus (10.7%±9.9%, n=38), whereas no significant difference in neointimal obstruction was found between single and multiple stenting in either CoStar or Taxus PES.The CoStar PES exhibits greater neointimal proliferation compared with Taxus PES at 9 months but with similar qualitative outcomes including late-acquired ISA. IVUS findings suggestive of stent fracture were found only in multiple-stenting cases irrespective of the stent used.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.carrev.2012.01.010

    View details for PubMedID 22406056

  • Intravascular Ultrasound Assessment of Postprocedural Incomplete Stent Apposition JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Kume, T., Waseda, K., Ako, J., Sakata, K., Yamasaki, M., Shimohama, T., Tsujino, I., Hasegawa, T., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2012; 24 (1): 13-16

    Abstract

    There has been no detailed intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis to evaluate the degree to which stent underexpansion or reference vessel/stent size mismatch contributes to the occurrence of post-procedural incomplete stent apposition (post-ISA).We evaluated 238 lesions treated with everolimus-eluting stents (n = 110) or paclitaxel-eluting stents (n = 128). Reference lumen/stent area ratio was defined as the ratio of lumen area adjacent to the stent edge in the reference segment to stent area at the stent edge or at stent body ISA site.Post-ISA was observed in 36 of the 238 cases (15%) at the proximal stent edge, 15 of the 238 cases (6%) at the distal stent edge and 14 of the 238 cases (6%) at stent body. Reference lumen/stent area ratio was significantly greater in the ISA group compared with non-ISA in proximal edge (127 ± 20 vs. 99 ± 10%; P<.001), and greater reference lumen/stent area ratio (118 ± 18 vs. 94 ± 11%; P<.001) and higher presence of calcification (60 vs. 29%; P<0.001) were observed in distal edge ISA group compared with non-ISA. At the stent body, presence of calcification was more frequently observed in the ISA compared with the non-ISA group (86 vs. 42%; P=.002).Post-ISA at the stent edge was significantly associated with vessel/stent mismatch rather than stent underexpansion. IVUS-guided appropriate stent or balloon sizing might be useful to prevent post-ISA and optimize initial stent deployment.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000299082000011

    View details for PubMedID 22210583

  • World Report: Up-to-Date. Stanford University Circulation Up-to-Date Honda Y 2012; 7 (2): 164-166
  • Intravascular ultrasound Catheter-Based Cardiovascular Interventions: A Knowledge-Based Approach Hahn JY, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2012: 325-345
  • Cardiovascular imaging for percutaneous coronary interventions Evidence Based Medicine: Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease 2012-2013 Yamada R, Honda Y 2012: 105-112
  • Assessment of macro- and microcirculation in contemporary critical limb ischemia CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Kawarada, O., Yokoi, Y., Higashimori, A., Waratani, N., Fujihara, M., Kume, T., Sakata, K., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2011; 78 (7): 1051-1058

    Abstract

    A paucity of data exists regarding manifestations of macro- and microcirculation in contemporary critical limb ischemia (CLI). The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the differences in foot circulation based on angiographic findings, (2) to clarify the relationship between macro- and microcirculation, and (3) to investigate the effects of postural changes on micro as well as macrocirculation between the supine position to the dependent position.A total of 40 critically ischemic limbs in 29 patients were included in this study. Noninvasive evaluation of macrocirculation, based on the ankle brachial index (ABI) and ankle pressure, and microcirculation, using skin perfusion pressure (SPP), was performed in both the supine and dependent positions.There was no significant difference in macro- and microcirculations between any angiographical involvements. In the supine position, dorsal SPP correlated significantly with ABI (P = 0.021, r = 0.363) and ankle-pressure (P = 0.001, r = 0.495), whereas plantar SPP failed to correlate with ABI (P = 0.198, r = 0.208) or ankle-pressure (P = 0.185, r = 0.214). In the dependent position, however, SPP showed no significant correlation with ABI and ankle pressure. Postural change from the supine to dependent position yielded a significant increase in SPP (dorsal: 37.2 ± 16.2 to 77.9 ± 17.7 mm Hg, P < 0.001; plantar: 33.6 ± 17.3 to 75.7 ± 18.3 mm Hg, P < 0.001) as well as ABI and ankle-pressure (ABI: 0.70 ± 0.35 to 0.78 ± 0.42, P = 0.003; ankle-pressure; 108 ± 61 to 111 ± 60 mm Hg, P = 0.038). The effect of postural change on SPP showed no difference between patients with and without any clinical and angiographical complications.Of microcirculation assessed, only dorsal SPP correlated significantly with macrocirculation in the supine position. Furthermore, postural change from the supine to dependent position produced a dramatic improvement in microcirculation due to the effects of gravity.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.23086

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297203000015

    View details for PubMedID 21805568

  • Discrepancy in the Assessment of Jailed Side Branch Lesions by Visual Estimation and Quantitative Coronary Angiographic Analysis: Comparison With Fractional Flow Reserve CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Shin, D., Koo, B., Waseda, K., Park, K. W., Kim, H., Corral, M., Lansky, A., Honda, Y., Fearon, W. F., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2011; 78 (5): 720-726

    Abstract

    We sought to evaluate the variability in the assessment of jailed side branch (SB) lesions by visual estimation and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and to compare those results with fractional flow reserve (FFR).Twenty jailed SB lesions with available FFR (median 0.76; range, 0.39-0.94) were selected from the PRESSURE trial. Lesions were assessed by three independent QCA core laboratories with different QCA systems and by three different cardiologist groups (five European bifurcation club members, five Korean experts, and five trainees). Agreements of the continuous measurements were expressed as the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and average coefficient of variance (CV), and those of the categorical values as kappa.Mean minimum lumen diameter (MLD) and % diameter stenosis differed among the three QCA systems up to 0.30 mm and 9.65%, respectively (P < 0.001). Three QCA systems showed fair agreement for the measurements of reference diameter, % diameter stenosis, MLD, and lesion length (ICC 0.346-0.686, CV 8.7-29.5%), and a poor agreement on stenosis of 75% or more (Fleiss κ 0.14 and mean κ 0.18). Agreements of visual estimation among the three groups were poor to fair (Fleiss κ 0.167-0.367). Sensitivity and specificity for predicting ischemia-inducible lesion (FFR < 0.75) were 64.7% and 48.0% for visual estimation and 56.6% and 56.6% by QCA, respectively. Visual estimation overestimated the % diameter stenosis and functional significance of the lesions compared with QCA (P < 0.001) and FFR (P = 0.036).Angiographic assessment of jailed SB lesions by both QCA and visual estimation showed variability. Visual estimation tended to overestimate the severity of jailed SB lesions compared to FFR and QCA.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.23049

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296412800012

    View details for PubMedID 22025472

  • Sex Differences in Neointimal Hyperplasia Following Endeavor Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Nakatani, D., Ako, J., Tremmel, J. A., Waseda, K., Otake, H., Koo, B., Miyazawa, A., Hongo, Y., Hur, S., Sakurai, R., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2011; 108 (7): 912-917

    Abstract

    Inconsistent results in outcomes have been observed between the genders after drug-eluting stent implantation. The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in neointimal proliferation for the Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES) and the Driver bare-metal stent (BMS). A total of 476 (n = 391 ZES, n = 85 BMS) patients whose volumetric intravascular ultrasound analyses were available at 8-month follow-up were studied. At 8 months, neointimal obstruction and maximum cross-sectional narrowing (CSN) were significantly lower in women than in men receiving ZES (neointimal obstruction 15.5 ± 9.5% vs 18.2 ± 10.9%, p = 0.025; maximum CSN 30.3 ± 13.2% vs 34.8 ± 15.0%, p = 0.007). Conversely, these parameters tended to be higher in women than in men receiving BMS (neointimal obstruction 36.3 ± 15.9% vs 27.5 ± 17.2%, p = 0.053; maximum CSN 54.3 ± 18.6% vs 45.6 ± 18.3%, p = 0.080). There was a significant interaction between stent type and gender regarding neointimal obstruction (p = 0.001) and maximum CSN (p = 0.003). Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that female gender was independently associated with lower neointimal obstruction (p = 0.027) and maximum CSN (p = 0.004) for ZES but not for BMS. Compared to BMS, ZES were independently associated with a reduced risk for binary restenosis in both genders (odds ratio for women 0.003, p = 0.001; odds ratio for men 0.191, p <0.001), but the magnitude of this risk reduction with ZES was significantly greater in women than men (p = 0.015). In conclusion, female gender is independently associated with decreased neointimal hyperplasia in patients treated with ZES. The magnitude of risk reduction for binary restenosis with ZES is significantly greater in women than in men.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.05.019

    View details for Web of Science ID 000295863200002

    View details for PubMedID 21784390

  • Impact of Donor-Transmitted Atherosclerosis on Early Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy: New Findings by Three-Dimensional Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis TRANSPLANTATION Yamasaki, M., Sakurai, R., Hirohata, A., Honda, Y., Bonneau, H. N., Luikart, H., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yeung, A. C., Valantine, H. A., Fearon, W. F. 2011; 91 (12): 1406-1411

    Abstract

    The influence of donor-transmitted coronary atherosclerosis (DA) on plaque progression during the first year after cardiac transplantation (Tx) is unknown.Serial 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies were performed within 8 weeks (baseline; BL) and at 1 year after Tx in 38 recipients. On the basis of maximum intimal thickness (MIT) at BL, recipients were divided into DA group (DA+; MIT?0.5 mm, n=23) or non-DA group (DA-; MIT<0.5 mm, n=15). Plaque, lumen, and vessel volume indexes were calculated by volume/measured length (mm/mm) in the left anterior descending artery. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were attempted to reveal clinical predictors of change in coronary dimensions.During the first year after Tx, plaque volume index increased significantly in DA+ group, but did not change in DA- Group (DA+, 3.0±1.5 to 4.1±1.5 mm/mm, P<0.0001: DA-, 1.2±0.4 to 1.3±0.5 mm/mm, P=0.53). In both groups vessel volume index decreased significantly (DA+, 16.3±3.6 to 14.6±3.3 mm/mm, P=0.003: DA-, 13.5±4.1 to 12.0±3.3 mm/mm, P=0.01), as did lumen volume index (DA+, 13.2±3.1 to 10.5±2.7 mm/mm, P<0.0001: DA-, 12.2±3.7 to 10.7±3.0 mm/mm, P=0.004). Univariate and multivariate regression analyses revealed that DA was one of the strongest predictors for plaque progression.DA was associated with significant plaque progression during the first year after Tx, and in conjunction with negative remodeling, may be an important determinant of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/TP.0b013e31821ab91b

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291430500019

    View details for PubMedID 21512436

  • Impact of Polymer Formulations on Neointimal Proliferation After Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent With Different Polymers Insights From the RESOLUTE Trial CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Waseda, K., Ako, J., Yamasaki, M., Koizumi, T., Sakurai, R., Hongo, Y., Koo, B., Ormiston, J., Worthley, S. G., Whitbourn, R. J., Walters, D. L., Meredith, I. T., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2011; 4 (3): 248-255

    Abstract

    Polymer formulation may affect the efficacy of drug-eluting stents. Resolute, Endeavor, and ZoMaxx are zotarolimus-eluting stents with different stent platforms and different polymer coatings and have been tested in clinical trials. The aim of this analysis was to compare the efficacy of zotarolimus-eluting stents with different polymers.Data were obtained from the first-in man trial or first randomized trials of each stent, The Clinical RESpOnse EvaLUation of the MedTronic Endeavor CR ABT-578 Eluting Coronary Stent System in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (RESOLUTE), Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Medtronic AVE ABT-578 Eluting Driver Coronary Stent in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (ENDEAVOR II), and ZoMaxx I trials. Follow-up intravascular ultrasound analyses (8 to 9 months of follow-up) were possible in 353 patients (Resolute: 88, Endeavor: 98, ZoMaxx: 82, Driver: 85). Volume index (volume/stent length) was obtained for vessel, stent, lumen, peristent plaque, and neointima. Cross-sectional narrowing was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area (%). Neointima-free frame ratio was calculated as the number of frames without intravascular ultrasound-detectable neointima divided by the total number of frames within the stent. At baseline, vessel, lumen, and peristent plaque volume index were not significantly different among the 4 stent groups. At follow-up, percent neointimal obstruction was significantly lower in Resolute compared with Endeavor, ZoMaxx, and Driver (Resolute: 3.7±4.0, Endeavor: 17.5±10.1, ZoMaxx: 14.6±8.1, Driver: 29.4±17.2%; P<0.001). Greater maximum cross-sectional narrowing and higher neointima-free frame ratio, suggesting less neointimal coverage, were observed in Resolute compared with other stent groups. Multiple regression analysis confirmed that the biodurable polymer used in Resolute independently correlated with neointimal suppression among 3 zotarolimus-eluting stents.The different polymer formulations significantly affect the relative amount of neointima for zotarolimus-eluting stents.URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00248079.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.110.957548

    View details for Web of Science ID 000291592000012

    View details for PubMedID 21586691

  • Intravascular Ultrasound Results From the NEVO ResElution-I Trial A Randomized, Blinded Comparison of Sirolimus-Eluting NEVO Stents With Paclitaxel-Eluting Taxus Liberte Stents in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Otake, H., Honda, Y., Courtney, B. K., Shimohama, T., Ako, J., Waseda, K., Macours, N., Rogers, C., Popma, J. J., Abizaid, A., Ormiston, J. A., Spaulding, C., Cohen, S. A., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2011; 4 (2): 146-U69

    Abstract

    The NEVO sirolimus-eluting stent (NEVO SES) is a novel cobalt-chromium stent combining sirolimus release from reservoirs with bioabsorbable polymer to reduce spatial and temporal polymer exposure. The aim of this study was to assess the arterial response to the NEVO SES in a randomized, blinded comparison versus the surface-coated TAXUS Liberte paclitaxel-eluting stent (TAXUS Liberté PES) in human native coronary lesions using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).The NEVO ResElution-I IVUS substudy enrolled 100 patients (1:1 randomization). In addition to standard IVUS variables, uniformity of neointimal distribution within stents was evaluated in 3 dimensions by computing mean neointimal thickness within 12 equally spaced radial sectors on every 1-mm cross section along the stented segment. The NEVO SES showed significantly less neointimal proliferation (neointimal obstruction: 5.5±11.0% versus 11.5±9.7%, P=0.02), resulting in less late lumen area loss and smaller maximum cross-sectional narrowing at 6 months. The absolute variability of neointima distribution, assessed by the standard deviation of neointimal thickness within each stent, was significantly reduced with the NEVO SES compared with the TAXUS Liberté PES(0.04±0.04 mm versus 0.10±0.07 mm, P<0.0001). TAXUS Liberté PES showed significantly greater positive vessel remodeling than the NEVO SES (?vessel volume index: 1.30±1.36 mm(3)/mm versus 0.36±0.63 mm(3)/mm, respectively, P=0.003).The NEVO SES with focal release of sirolimus from reservoirs achieved significantly greater and more consistent suppression of neointimal hyperplasia than the surface-coated TAXUS Liberté PES. This was associated with less positive remodeling and no increased morphological or morphometric abnormalities surrounding the stent or at the stent margins.URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00714883.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.110.957175

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289673600012

    View details for PubMedID 21386089

  • Stent-Assisted Below-the-Ankle Angioplasty for Limb Salvage JOURNAL OF ENDOVASCULAR THERAPY Kawarada, O., Yokoi, Y., Higashimori, A., Waratani, N., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2011; 18 (1): 32-42

    Abstract

    To report the clinical outcome of stent-assisted below-the-ankle angioplasty for limb salvage in the setting of critical limb ischemia (CLI).A retrospective single-center study was conducted of 40 critical ischemic limbs in 31 patients (mean age 67 ± 8 years, range 46-94) undergoing below-the-ankle stent-assisted angioplasty between April 2006 and April 2009. Coronary bare metal stents were implanted in cases of failed balloon angioplasty due to significant recoil, flow-limiting dissection, abrupt closure, or repeat early reocclusion.Technical success was 93% (37 limbs), with 3 failures to cross the occlusive lesions. Acute or subacute occlusion was evident in 9 (23%) limbs. The number of runoff vessels increased significantly (p < 0.001) from 0.6 ± 0.8 to 1.8 ± 0.8. During a clinical follow-up of 19.3 ± 11.4 months (range 1-48), the number of repeat interventions for limb salvage was 2.2 ± 1.6 (range 1-9), and a total of 1.6 ± 0.9 stents (range 1-3) were implanted in 8 dorsalis pedis arteries. Acute or subacute stent thrombosis after stenting was observed in 2 of these, and symptomatic in-stent restenosis was detected in 4, which were all treated by repeat intervention. At 6, 12, and 24 months, the freedom from repeat intervention was 39.6%, 39.6%, and 35.2%, respectively. Amputation-free survival was 80.0%, 69.7%, and 62.7%, and limb salvage was 94.7%, 91.4%, and 82.1% at the same time points. Patient survival rates were 77.4%, 71.0%, and 71.0%, respectively. During a mean follow-up of 13.4 ± 12.7 months (range 1-31 months) in 7 of the 8 stented arteries, all examined stents were deformed: stent compression was evident in 5 and stent fracture in 5. However, 7 limbs undergoing dorsalis pedis artery stenting showed complete wound healing; 1 limb had a resistant wound in the heel.Stent-assisted below-the-ankle angioplasty produced a satisfactory clinical outcome but with the need for repeat intervention. Thus, further refinement in endovascular technology is mandatory to reduce the need for repeat interventions and to resolve stent deformity issues.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287071700005

    View details for PubMedID 21314346

  • Intravascular ultrasound Textbook of Interventional Cardiology Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ, Yock PG 2011: 793-808
  • Optical coherence tomography for patient-specific 3D artery reconstruction and evaluation of wall shear stress in a left circumflex coronary artery Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology Laura M. Ellwein, Hiromasa Otake, Timothy J. Gundert, Bon-Kwon Koo, Toshiro Shinke, Yasuhiro Honda, Junya Shite, John F. LaDisa 2011; 2 (3): 212-227
  • Coronary artery physiology: intracoronary ultrasonography, coronary flow velocity and pressure measurements McGraw-Hill Specialty Board Review: Cardiology Koo BK, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2011: 419-429
  • Awareness of Anatomical Variations for Infrapopliteral Intervention CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Kawarada, O., Yokoi, Y., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 76 (6): 888-894

    Abstract

    With the tremendous advancement and accumulated expertise of endovascular techniques, infrapopliteal intervention is emerging as an alternative therapeutic option to distal bypass surgery for limb salvage in the setting of critical limb ischemia (CLI). However, though much attention has been given to infrapopliteal intervention, the importance of identifying preprocedural infrapopliteal variants remains underappreciated. Becoming more aware of these anatomical variants will translate to increased clinical effectiveness for the patient with infrapopliteal artery disease. Therefore, this review will highlight the fundamental aspects of infrapopliteal variant anatomy for the catheter-based treatment of CLI patients with symptomatic infrapopliteal artery disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.22673

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284676100022

    View details for PubMedID 20578165

  • Neointimal hyperplasia in a thin-strut cobalt-chromium stent: Insights from detailed 3-D intravascular ultrasound analysis INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Otake, H., Ako, J., Waseda, K., Sakurai, R., Hirohata, A., Kaneda, H., Hasegawa, T., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 145 (1): 125-126

    Abstract

    The effect of current generation cobalt-chromium stents on neointimal proliferation has not been fully elucidated. IVUS images of 137 patients treated with a single thin-strut cobalt-chromium stent (Driver: DRI, n=74) or stainless steel stent (Multilink plus: ML, n=63) were selected. Although % neointima volume (neointimal volume divided by stent volume) were comparable, DRI showed significantly smaller maximum %cross-sectional narrowing (%CSN: neointimal area divided by stent area) (P=0.006) with significantly less %CSN>60 (percent stent length with %CSN>60%) than ML (P=0.04). In conclusion, the amount of neointimal hyperplasia after DRI implantation was comparable to that after ML. However, current generation cobalt-chromium DRI may show less and shorter severe narrowing than the stainless steel ML.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.06.038

    View details for Web of Science ID 000283727000070

    View details for PubMedID 19619904

  • Comparison of Vascular Response to Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent vs Paclitaxel-Eluting Stent Implantation - Pooled IVUS Results From the ZoMaxx I and II Trials CIRCULATION JOURNAL Waseda, K., Hasegawa, T., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Grube, E., Whitbourn, R., Ormiston, J., O'Shaughnessy, C. D., Henry, T. D., Overlie, P., Schwartz, L. B., Sudhir, K., Chevalier, B., Gray, W. A., Yeung, A. C., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 74 (11): 2334-2339

    Abstract

    The ZoMaxx I and II trials were randomized controlled studies of the zotarolimus-eluting, phosphorylcholine-coated, TriMaxx stent for the treatment of de novo coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to compare the vessel response between zotarolimus- (ZES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).Data were obtained from the ZoMaxx I and II trials, in which a standard IVUS parameter was available in 263 cases (baseline and 9-months follow up). Neointima-free frame ratio was calculated as the number of frames without IVUS-detectable neointima divided by the total number of frames within the stent. While an increase in vessel and plaque was observed in PES from baseline to follow up, there was no significant change in ZES. At follow up, % neointimal obstruction was significantly higher (15.4 ± 8.8% vs 11.3 ± 9.7%), and minimum lumen area at follow up was significantly smaller in ZES compared to PES. However, the incidence of IVUS-defined restenosis (maximum cross-sectional narrowing >60%) was similar in the 2 groups (3.2% vs 6.7%). Neointima-free frame ratio was significantly lower in ZES. There were 5 cases of late incomplete stent apposition in PES and none in ZES.These IVUS results demonstrate a similar incidence of severe narrowing between these 2 DES. There was a moderate increase in neointimal hyperplasia that was associated with a greater extent of neointimal coverage in ZES compared with PES.

    View details for DOI 10.1253/circj.CJ-09-0850

    View details for Web of Science ID 000283623200018

    View details for PubMedID 20890052

  • Short- and Mid-Term Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis of the New Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent With Durable Polymer - Results From the RESOLUTE Trial - CIRCULATION JOURNAL Waseda, K., Ako, J., Yamasaki, M., Koizumi, T., Ormiston, J., Worthley, S. G., Whitbourn, R. J., Walters, D. L., Honda, Y., Meredith, I. T., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 74 (10): 2097-2102

    Abstract

    The Resolute stent is a newly developed system with a bio-histocompatible polymer that allows programmed drug delivery up to 180 days. The aim of this intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis was to evaluate the short- (4 months) and mid-term (9 months) efficacy using the Resolute stent.Data were derived from the RESOLUTE trial, a prospective, multicenter, non-randomized, single-arm study to treat de novo native coronary artery lesions. This trial included 2 cohorts with different follow-up periods, and all enrollment patients in this trial received IVUS study. Follow-up IVUS was available in 24 patients (4-month group) and 88 patients (9-month group). Neointimal obstruction (%) was defined as neointimal volume divided by stent volume. Cross-sectional narrowing (CSN, %) was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area. No significant differences in vessel, lumen and stent volume at post-procedure were observed within stented segments between the 4- and 9-month follow-up groups. Although neointimal volume and % neointimal obstruction showed no significant difference between the 2 groups (% neointimal obstruction: 2.2 ± 2.5 vs 3.7 ± 4.0%, P=0.09), maximum CSN was significantly larger in the 9-month group. There were 7 cases of late incomplete stent apposition.These IVUS results showed minimum growth of neointimal proliferation by the Resolute stent throughout the stented segment up to 9 months follow up.?

    View details for DOI 10.1253/circj.CJ-10-0063

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282562300015

    View details for PubMedID 20689221

  • Incidence of diffuse and focal chronic stent recoil after implantation of current generation bare-metal and drug-eluting stents INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Koo, B., Waseda, K., Ako, J., Hasegawa, T., Shimohama, T., Nakatani, D., Otake, H., Yamasaki, M., Sakurai, R., Tsujino, I., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 144 (1): 132-134

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.12.117

    View details for Web of Science ID 000282679000054

    View details for PubMedID 19171393

  • Comparison of Everolimus- Versus Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents Implanted in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus as Evaluated by Three-Dimensional Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Otake, H., Ako, J., Yamasaki, M., Tsujino, I., Shimohama, T., Hasegawa, T., Sakurai, R., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Sood, P., Sudhir, K., Stone, G. W., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 106 (4): 492-497

    Abstract

    Previous reports have shown the advantage of paclitaxel compared to limus-derivative drugs for the treatment of diabetics. A total of 109 diabetics (115 lesions) treated with everolimus-eluting stents (EESs, n = 58) or paclitaxel-eluting stents (PESs, n = 55) undergoing 8 to 9 months of follow-up 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound examinations were enrolled. In addition to the standard intravascular ultrasound parameters, the percentage of neointimal volume (neointimal volume/stent volume) and maximum percentage of cross-sectional narrowing (neointimal area/stent area) was calculated. EESs showed a lower percentage of neointimal volume (7.2 +/- 7.1% vs 11.7 +/- 11.0%; p = 0.01) and maximum percentage of cross-sectional narrowing (22.5 +/- 16.3% vs 29.4 +/- 19.2%; p = 0.04) than PESs. One case of severe narrowing (lesions with maximum percentage of cross-sectional narrowing >60%) in the EES group developed and 6 cases in the PESs group (p = 0.05). The EESs showed no serial changes for vessel or peri-stent plaque during the follow-up period, and PESs showed significant increases in vessel and peri-stent plaque. PESs showed significantly greater peri-stent plaque increase, with a tendency toward greater vessel enlargement than EESs. Late acquired incomplete stent apposition was observed in 2 PES cases. The major adverse cardiac event rate was comparable < or =2 years. In conclusion, EESs showed greater neointimal suppression without significant vessel expansion than PESs in diabetic patients. In this small cohort, no significant differences were observed in the major adverse cardiac event rate < or =2 years.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.03.059

    View details for Web of Science ID 000281174500007

    View details for PubMedID 20691306

  • Comparisons of Baseline Demographics, Clinical Presentation, and Long-Term Outcome Among Patients With Early, Late, and Very Late Stent Thrombosis of Sirolimus-Eluting Stents Observations From the Registry of Stent Thrombosis for Review and Reevaluation (RESTART) CIRCULATION Kimura, T., Morimoto, T., Kozuma, K., Honda, Y., Kume, T., Aizawa, T., Mitsudo, K., Miyazaki, S., Yamaguchi, T., Hiyoshi, E., Nishimura, E., Isshiki, T. 2010; 122 (1): 52-U120

    Abstract

    Stent thrombosis (ST) after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation has not yet been adequately characterized, mainly because of its low incidence.The Registry of Stent Thrombosis for Review and Reevaluation (RESTART) is a Japanese nationwide registry of sirolimus-eluting stent-associated ST comprising 611 patients with definite ST (early [within 30 days; EST], 322 patients; late [between 31 and 365 days; LST], 105 patients; and very late [>1 year; VLST], 184 patients). Baseline demographics, clinical presentation, and long-term outcome of sirolimus-eluting stent-associated ST were compared among patients with EST, LST, and VLST. Baseline demographics were significantly different according to the timing of ST. Characteristic demographic factors for LST/VLST versus EST identified by multivariable model were hemodialysis, end-stage renal disease not on hemodialysis, absence of circumflex target, target of chronic total occlusion, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, and age <65 years. For LST versus VLST, they were hemodialysis, heart failure, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and low body mass index. Patients with LST had a significantly higher rate of Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction grade 2/3 flow (36%) at the time of ST than those with EST (13%) (P<0.0001) and VLST (17%; P<0.0001). Mortality rate at 1 year after ST was significantly lower in patients with VLST (10.5%) compared with those with EST (22.4%; P=0.003) or LST (23.5%; P=0.009).ST timing-dependent differences in baseline demographic features, Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade, and mortality rate suggest possible differences in the predominant pathophysiological mechanisms of ST according to timing after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.903955

    View details for Web of Science ID 000279560800008

    View details for PubMedID 20566955

  • Mechanism of lumen gain with a novel rotational aspiration atherectomy system for peripheral arterial disease: examination by intravascular ultrasound. Cardiovascular revascularization medicine : including molecular interventions Hassan, A. H., Ako, J., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Zeller, T., Leon, M. B., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 11 (3): 155-158

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of luminal gain with a novel atheroablation system (Pathway PV) for the treatment of peripheral artery disease using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).The atherectomy system is a rotational atherectomy device, which employs expandable rotating blades with ports that allow flushing and aspiration of the plaque material or thrombus. In this first-in-man clinical study, IVUS analysis was available in 6 patients with lower limb ischemia treated with this device. The treatment results were assessed using IVUS at pre and post atherectomy. Lumen beyond burr size (LBB) was defined as lumen gain divided by the estimated burr area determined by the burr-size.IVUS analysis was available in six patients (superficial femoral artery n=3, popliteal artery n=2, posterior tibial artery n=1). Atheroablation achieved a significant increase in lumen area (LA) (preintervention 3.9+/-0.4, postatheroablation 8.0+/-1.7 mm(2), P<.05), and significant reduction in plaque area (27.5+/-4.0, 23.7+/-3.1 mm(2), P=.001), while there was no change in the vessel area (31.3+/-4.2, 32.1+/-2.8 mm(2), P=.4). LBB was 57.4+/-51.3%.This novel rotational aspiration atherectomy device achieved significant luminal gain by debulking in the absence of vessel stretching. The LA was greater than burr-sized lumen expectancy at cross-sections along the treated segments, suggesting a complimentary role of aspiration in luminal gain in atherosclerotic peripheral artery lesions.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.carrev.2009.05.001

    View details for PubMedID 20599165

  • Vascular responses to the multiple overlapped paclitaxel-eluting stents for the treatment of bare-metal in-stent restenotic lesions: angiographic and intravascular ultrasound analysis from the TAXUS-V ISR trial. Cardiovascular revascularization medicine : including molecular interventions Koizumi, T., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y., Ellis, S. G., Kent, K., Martin, S. L., Brown, C. L., Masud, A. R., Patterson, J. B., Greenberg, J., Friedman, M., Uchida, T., Stone, G. W. 2010; 11 (3): 140-148

    Abstract

    Although effective coverage of coronary diffuse in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesions has warranted the use of multiple drug-eluting stents, the vessel response to paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) overlap is not fully understood.In the TAXUS-V ISR, i.e., comparing PES versus brachytherapy for the treatment of bare-metal ISR, angiographic analyses at 9-month follow-up were available in 184 ISR lesions treated with PES.In-stent late loss in entire stented segment of multiple PES (n=50) was 0.45+/-0.48 mm, whereas that of single PES (n=134) was 0.3+/-0.47 mm, P=.06. No aneurysm was observed at overlapping PES segments at 9 months. Stent thrombosis up to 9 months was observed in one in each group (single PES, 0.7% vs. multiple PES, 1.8%; P=.47). In a subset of 30 patients, volumetric intravascular ultrasound analysis demonstrated that in-stent net volume obstruction was 12.3+/-12.4 in single PES (n=20) and 14.9+/-9.8 in multiple PES (n=10), P=.60. The changes of vessel and lumen at the overlapping PES segment were similar to those of the adjacent 5-mm segments (Deltaminimum lumen area, mm(2): -1.2+/-1.0, -1.1+/-1.1, -0.8+/-0.9, P=.48; Deltavessel volume, mm(3)/mm: -0.2+/-1.4, 0.1+/-1.7, 0.3+/-1.3, P=.37; proximal, overlap, distal segment, respectively). There was no late incomplete stent apposition at overlapping PES segments.No in vivo evidence of adverse local vessel response at the site of overlapping PES for the treatment of bare-metal ISR has been demonstrated.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.carrev.2009.07.004

    View details for PubMedID 20599163

  • SPIRIT III JAPAN Versus SPIRIT III USA: A Comparative Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis of the Everolimus-Eluting Stent AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Shimohama, T., Ako, J., Yamasaki, M., Otake, H., Tsujino, I., Hasegawa, T., Nakatani, D., Sakurai, R., Chang, H., Kusano, H., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Stone, G. W., Saito, S., Fitzgerald, P. J., Sudhir, K. 2010; 106 (1): 13-17

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the vascular response after everolimus-eluting stent (EES) implantation in the SPIRIT III Japan Registry (JAPAN) compared to EES implantation in the SPIRIT III United States (USA) trial using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis. Data were obtained from the JAPAN and the randomized EES arm of the USA trial. Serial (postprocedure and 8-month follow-up) IVUS analysis was available in 199 lesions (JAPAN 82, USA 117) of 183 patients (JAPAN 73, USA 110). Although no difference was observed in vessel size in the reference segment between the 2 groups, postprocedure minimum lumen area and stent volume index were significantly greater in the JAPAN arm (minimum lumen area 5.8 +/- 2.2 vs 5.1 +/- 1.5 mm(2), p = 0.03; stent volume index 7.0 +/- 2.4 vs 6.3 +/- 1.7 mm(3)/mm, p = 0.03). Postprocedure incomplete stent apposition (ISA) was less frequently observed in the JAPAN arm (15.9% vs 33.3%, p = 0.006), possibly related to higher maximum balloon pressure and/or more postdilatation without excess tissue prolapse or edge dissection. In the JAPAN arm, percent neointimal obstruction and maximum percent cross-sectional narrowing were significantly lower at 8-month follow-up (percent neointimal obstruction 3.5 +/- 4.2% vs 6.8 +/- 6.4%, p = 0.0004). Late acquired ISA was infrequent in the 2 arms. In conclusion, comparative IVUS analysis between the JAPAN and USA arms showed more optimal stent deployment in the JAPAN arm as evidenced by the lower incidence of postprocedure ISA and larger minimum lumen area after the procedure. Moreover, there was less neointimal hyperplasia in patients with EES implants from the JAPAN arm compared to the USA arm.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.02.008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000279659700003

    View details for PubMedID 20609640

  • Vascular Response to Overlapping Everolimus-Eluting Stents - Comparison With Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents CIRCULATION JOURNAL Otake, H., Honda, Y., Yamasaki, M., Tsujino, I., Shimohama, T., Sakurai, R., Hasegawa, T., Waseda, K., Ako, J., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 74 (5): 1023-1025

    Abstract

    Overlapping drug-eluting stents might be associated with an adverse vessel response because of increased drug/polymer toxicity and lesion rigidity.Lesions treated with overlapping everolimus- (EES=36) or paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES=38) were analyzed for 8-9-months by 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound. EES were associated with significantly greater neointimal suppression in the single-strut regions than PES, with a similar trend in the overlap region. PES had significant vessel expansion in all regions, whereas there were no changes with EES. Neither stent fracture nor late incomplete stent apposition (LISA) in the overlap region was observed.Overlapping EES appears to be effective without vessel expansion, stent fracture or LISA for up to 8-9 months.

    View details for DOI 10.1253/circj.CJ-10-0052

    View details for Web of Science ID 000277226100033

    View details for PubMedID 20424338

  • Anatomic and Functional Evaluation of Bifurcation Lesions Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Koo, B., Waseda, K., Kang, H., Kim, H., Nam, C., Hur, S., Kim, J., Choi, D., Jang, Y., Hahn, J., Gwon, H., Yoon, M., Tahk, S., Chung, W., Cho, Y., Choi, D., Hasegawa, T., Kataoka, T., Oh, S. J., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J., Fearon, W. F. 2010; 3 (2): 113-119

    Abstract

    We sought to investigate the mechanism of geometric changes after main branch (MB) stent implantation and to identify the predictors of functionally significant "jailed" side branch (SB) lesions.Seventy-seven patients with bifurcation lesions were prospectively enrolled from 8 centers. MB intravascular ultrasound was performed before and after MB stent implantation, and fractional flow reserve was measured in the jailed SB. The vessel volume index of both the proximal and distal MB was increased after stent implantation. The plaque volume index decreased in the proximal MB (9.1+/-3.0 to 8.4+/-2.4 mm(3)/mm, P=0.001), implicating plaque shift, but not in the distal MB (5.4+/-1.8 to 5.3+/-1.7 mm(3)/mm, P=0.227), implicating carina shifting to account for the change in vessel size (N=56). The mean SB fractional flow reserve was 0.71+/-0.20 (N=68) and 43% of the lesions were functionally significant. Binary logistic-regression analysis revealed that preintervention % diameter stenosis of the SB (odds ratio=1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09) and the MB minimum lumen diameter located distal to the SB ostium (odds ratio=3.86; 95% CI, 1.03 to 14.43) were independent predictors of functionally significant SB jailing. In patients with > or =75% stenosis and Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade 3 flow in the SB, no difference in post-stent angiographic and intravascular ultrasound parameters was found between SB lesions with and without functional significance.Both plaque shift from the MB and carina shift contribute to the creation/aggravation of an SB ostial lesion after MB stent implantation. Anatomic evaluation does not reliably predict the functional significance of a jailed SB stenosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.109.887406

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276873400005

    View details for PubMedID 20407111

  • Sirolimus-eluting stent implantation in small coronary arteries: A three dimensional intravascular ultrasound study from the SIRIUS trial INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Ako, J., Terashima, M., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Leon, M. B., Moses, J. W., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2010; 138 (2): 126-130

    Abstract

    To assess the efficacy of the sirolimus-eluting stent when implanted in smaller caliber vessels using three-dimensional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis.One hundred and twenty-three patients (69 sirolimus-coated Bx Velocity and 54 control) who underwent successful three-dimensional IVUS at follow up comprised this IVUS substudy from the SIRIUS (SIRolImUS-coated Bx Velocity stent in the treatment of patients with de novo coronary artery lesions) population. To evaluate the impact of vessel size, 2 groups were created using QCA reference vessel diameter (RVD; large vessel group: RVD>/=2.75 mm and small vessel group: RVD<2.75 mm).Sirolimus-eluting stents significantly reduced neointimal hyperplasia by the same relative magnitude within the stent in small vessels as well as in large vessels. Although sirolimus-eluting stents had favorable effects on lumen area at stent edges in larger vessels, the effect was less in smaller vessels, especially at the proximal edge. IVUS-detected adverse vessel response, such as late-acquired incomplete apposition, did not increase in smaller vessels even with relatively higher dose exposure.Sirolimus-eluting stents showed inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in small vessels compared to bare metal stents with no increase of vascular complications.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2008.08.006

    View details for Web of Science ID 000273613300004

    View details for PubMedID 18804877

  • Plaque Characterization - IVUS, OCT Current Therapy Sakata K, Honda Y, Yamagishi M 2010; 28 (5): 26-32
  • Stent Expansion as a Mechanical Parameter to Predict Late Stent Patency Back to the Basics JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2009; 2 (12): 1276-1278

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcin.2009.10.013

    View details for Web of Science ID 000275914400015

    View details for PubMedID 20129556

  • Preprocedural Inflammation Does Not Affect Neointimal Hyperplasia following Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Nakatani, D., Ako, J., Yamasaki, M., Shimohama, T., Hasegawa, T., Otake, H., Waseda, K., Tsujino, I., Sakurai, R., Koo, B., Chang, H., Yock, P. G., Sudhir, K., Pierson, W., Stone, G. W., Saito, S., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2009; 21 (12): 613-617

    Abstract

    Preprocedual C-reactive protein (CRP) has been reported to correlate with in-stent restenosis following bare-metal stent implantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of preprocedural inflammation on neointimal hyperplasia assessed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) following everolimus-eluting stent (EES) implantation.We identified 134 patients meeting the following criteria: 1) patients treated with EES; 2) those with stable or unstable angina; and 3) patients available for high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP before the procedure and volumetric IVUS analysis at follow up. We divided the patients into two groups on the basis of hs-CRP levels (< 3 or > or = 3 mg/L) before the procedure and compared IVUS parameters. Volume index (volume/length) was calculated for vessel (VVI), plaque (PVI), neointima (NIV), stent (SVI), and lumen (LVI). Percent neointimal volume (%NIV) was calculated as (NIV/SVI) x 100. Cross-sectional narrowing (CSN) was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area (%).There was no significant difference in VVI, PVI, or LVI at either baseline or 8-month follow up between the two groups. At 8-month follow up, there was also no significant difference in %NIV (4.93 +/- 5.66% vs. 4.98 +/- 5.25% p = 0.959) and maximum %CSN (16.81 +/- 13.62% vs. 18.14 +/- 13.91%; p = 0.608) as well as VVI, PVI, and LVI between the two groups. Furthermore, hs-CRP did not correlate with %NIV (r = 0.044; p = 0.610) and maximum %CSN (r = 0.086, p = 0.321) at follow up. There was no significant difference in incidence of late-acquired incomplete stent apposition between the two groups (1.2% vs. 0%; p = 0.512).Our results suggest that preprocedural inflammation does not affect neointimal hyperplasia following EES implantation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284807300002

    View details for PubMedID 19966361

  • Late-acquired incomplete stent apposition: morphologic characterization. Cardiovascular revascularization medicine : including molecular interventions Hur, S., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Sudhir, K., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2009; 10 (4): 236-246

    Abstract

    Incomplete stent apposition (ISA) is a lack of contact between stents and the underlying vessel wall, best described by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Late acquired incomplete apposition, defined as complete stent apposition at the time of procedure but ISA at follow-up, is an unusual IVUS finding reported in intracoronary brachytherapy, bare-metal stent (BMS), and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Late-acquired ISA is observed relatively more frequently with DES implantation compared with BMS implantation. Possible mechanisms of this phenomenon include focal/extensive vascular remodeling and dissolution of thrombus. While there are conflicting reports regarding the possible impact of this IVUS finding on clinical outcomes, recent reports of DES have suggested its possible association with late adverse cardiac events including late stent thrombosis. In this paper, we review the incidence, location, underlying pathology, and possible clinical sequelae of late-acquired ISA, primarily focusing on that of DES.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.carrev.2009.02.002

    View details for PubMedID 19815171

  • Intravascular Ultrasound Results From the ENDEAVOR IV Trial Randomized Comparison Between Zotarolimus- and Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Waseda, K., Miyazawa, A., Ako, J., Hasegawa, T., Tsujino, I., Sakurai, R., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Kandzari, D. E., Leon, M. B., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2009; 2 (8): 779-784

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to compare the vessel response between zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) using intravascular ultrasound.The ENDEAVOR IV (Randomized Comparison of Zotarolimus- and Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease) trial was a randomized controlled study of zotarolimus-eluting, phosphorylcholine-coated, cobalt-alloy stents for the treatment of de novo coronary lesions compared with using PES for the same treatment.Data were obtained from patients with serial (baseline and 8-months follow-up) intravascular ultrasound analysis available (n = 198). Volumetric analysis was performed for vessel, lumen, plaque, stent, and neointima. Cross-sectional narrowing (given as percentage) was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area. Neointima-free frame ratio was calculated as the number of frames without intravascular ultrasound-detectable neointima divided by the total number of frames within the stent. Subsegment analysis was performed at every matched 1-mm subsegment throughout the stent.At follow-up, the ZES group showed significantly greater percentage of neointimal obstruction (16.6 +/- 12.0% vs. 9.9 +/- 8.9%, p < 0.01) and maximum cross-sectional narrowing (31.8 +/- 16.1% vs. 25.2 +/- 14.9%, p < 0.01) with smaller minimum lumen area than the PES group did. However, the incidence of maximum cross-sectional narrowing >50% was similar in the 2 groups. Neointima-free frame ratio was significantly lower in the ZES group. In overall analysis, whereas the PES group showed positive remodeling during follow-up (13.7 +/- 4.2 mm(3)/mm to 14.3 +/- 4.3 mm(3)/mm), the ZES group showed no significant difference (12.7 +/- 3.6 mm(3)/mm to 12.9 +/- 3.5 mm(3)/mm). In subsegment analysis, significant focal positive vessel remodeling was observed in 5% of ZES and 25% of PES cases (p < 0.05).There were different global and focal vessel responses for ZES and PES. Both drug-eluting stents showed a similar incidence of lesions with severe narrowing despite ZES having a moderate increase in neointimal hyperplasia compared with neointimal hyperplasia in PES. There was a relatively lower neointima-free frame ratio in ZES, suggesting a greater extent of neointimal coverage. (The ENDEAVOR IV Clinical Trial: A Trial of a Coronary Stent System in Coronary Artery Lesions; NCT00217269).

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcin.2009.05.015

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278971500011

    View details for PubMedID 19695548

  • Drug-Eluting Stents - Insights From Invasive Imaging Technologies - CIRCULATION JOURNAL Honda, Y. 2009; 73 (8): 1371-1380

    Abstract

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) represent a revolutionary technology in their unique ability to provide both mechanical and biological solutions simultaneously to the target lesion. As a result of biological effects from the pharmacological agents and interaction of DES components with the arterial wall, considerable differences exist between DES and conventional bare metal stents (BMS), yet some of the old lessons learned in the BMS era remain clinically significant. In this context, contrast angiography provides very little information about in vivo device properties and their biomechanical effects on the arterial wall. In contrast, current catheter-based imaging tools, such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and intracoronary angioscopy can offer unique insights into DES through direct assessment of the device and treated vessel in the clinical setting. This article reviews these insights from current DES with particular focus on performance and safety characteristics as well as discussing an optimal deployment technique, based upon findings obtained through the use of the invasive imaging technologies.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000268433600003

    View details for PubMedID 19574723

  • A Novel Technique for Endovascular Detection and Removal of Radiographic Contrast during Angiography JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Chang, H., Hassan, A. H., Kim, Y. L., Lloyd, L. J., Koo, B., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Davidson, C. J., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2009; 21 (7): 314-318

    Abstract

    This study aims at in-vitro validation of the principles of endovascular detection of contrast medium and assessing the feasibility of in-vivo detection and removal of contrast during angiography.Contrast-induced nephropathy is a growing concern in current percutaneous interventions with increasing lesion complexity and patient comorbidity. To address this clinical problem, a novel method of endovascular detection and automatic removal of contrast has been developed, and is comprised of a catheter-based system with a reflectance-type optical sensor.Blood samples were obtained from ovine subjects to characterize the optical response of blood by measuring the reflectance spectrum at varying levels of hematocrit diluted by a contrast agent. The results from the in-vitro test were implemented into an in-vivo system. An aspiration catheter equipped with a fiberoptic sensor was inserted into the coronary sinus (CS) of 5 canines. Contrast was administered through the coronary artery and reflectance signals were recorded at the CS. The removal rate was analyzed through 20 specimen collections.A proportional relationship was found between hematocrit and reflectance intensity in in-vitro test. Upon in-vivo detection of contrast, the sensor signal showed a 79.5 +/- 9.9% (n = 33) drop from the pre-injection baseline. This was highly reproducible and beyond the noise level of baseline, (2.5 +/- 0.9%), enabling automatic activation of the aspiration system. The signal duration was 12.2 +/- 3.7 seconds. The removal rate of contrast was 59.3 +/- 11%.The present study validated the principles of endovascular contrast detection and demonstrated the feasibility of an in-vivo, catheter-based removal of contrast using reflectance technology.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284806800005

    View details for PubMedID 19571339

  • A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized Trial to Assess Efficacy of Pioglitazone on In-Stent Neointimal Suppression in Type 2 Diabetes POPPS (Prevention of In-Stent Neointimal Proliferation by Pioglitazone Study) JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Takagi, T., Okura, H., Kobayashi, Y., Kataoka, T., Taguchi, H., Toda, I., Tamita, K., Yamamuro, A., Sakanoue, Y., Ito, A., Yanagi, S., Shimeno, K., Waseda, K., Yamasaki, M., Fitzgerald, P. J., Ikeno, F., Honda, Y., Yoshiyama, M., Yoshikawa, J. 2009; 2 (6): 524-531

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether pioglitazone suppresses in-stent neointimal proliferation and reduces restenosis and target lesion revascularization (TLR) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Previous single-center studies have demonstrated the anti-restenotic effect of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, pioglitazone, after PCI.A total of 97 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) undergoing PCI (bare-metal stents only) were enrolled. After PCI, patients were randomly assigned to either the pioglitazone group (n = 48) or the control group (n = 49). Angiographical and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging were performed at baseline and repeated at 6-month follow-up. Primary end points included angiographical restenosis and TLR at 6 months follow-up. Secondary end point was in-stent neointimal volume by IVUS.Baseline glucose level and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level were similar between the pioglitazone group and the control group. Angiographical restenosis rate was 17% in the pioglitazone group and 35% in control group (p = 0.06). The TLR was significantly lower in pioglitazone group than in control group (12.5% vs. 29.8%, p = 0.04). By IVUS (n = 56), in-stent neointimal volume at 6 months showed a trend toward smaller in the pioglitazone group than in the control group (48.0 +/- 30.2 mm(3) vs. 62.7 +/- 29.0 mm(3), p = 0.07). Neointimal index (neointimal volume/stent volume x 100) was significantly smaller in the pioglitazone group than in the control group (31.1 +/- 14.3% vs. 40.5 +/- 12.9%, p = 0.01).Pioglitazone treatment might suppress in-stent neointimal proliferation and reduce incidence of TLR after PCI in patients with T2DM.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcin.2009.04.007

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278971200008

    View details for PubMedID 19539256

  • Local Determinants of Thrombus Formation Following Sirolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Assessed by Optical Coherence Tomography JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Otake, H., Shite, J., Ako, J., Shinke, T., Tanino, Y., Ogasawara, D., Sawada, T., Miyoshi, N., Kato, H., Koo, B., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J., Hirata, K. 2009; 2 (5): 459-466

    Abstract

    We conducted this study to assess the prevalence and determinants of subclinical thrombus after sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation.Angioscopic analyses have demonstrated the presence of thrombus is more common than the clinical incidence of SES thrombosis.Fifty-three patients (53 lesions) underwent 6-month follow-up optical coherence tomography. A stent eccentricity index ([SEI] minimum/maximum stent diameter) was determined in each cross section. To evaluate unevenness of neointimal thickness, a neointimal unevenness score ([NUS] maximum neointimal thickness in the cross section/average neointimal thickness of the same cross section) was calculated for each cross section. Average SEI and NUS were calculated for each stent. Major adverse cardiac events were defined as a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization.Fourteen cases of thrombus (26%) were detected by optical coherence tomography (thrombus: n = 14 vs. nonthrombus: n = 39). The percentage of thrombus was associated with longer stents (36.4 +/- 20.2 mm vs. 25.1 +/- 9.8 mm; p = 0.008), a larger number of uncovered struts (17 +/- 16 vs. 8 +/- 11; p = 0.03), smaller average SEI (0.89 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.92 +/- 0.03; p = 0.001), and greater average NUS (2.22 +/- 0.24 vs. 2.00 +/- 0.33; p = 0.03). A significant relationship existed between average SEI and average NUS (p < 0.0001, R = 0.68), and between average SEI and the number of uncovered struts (p < 0.0006, R = 0.46). There was no significant difference in major adverse cardiac events during follow-up (median: 485 days, 7.1% vs. 12.8%; p > 0.99).Longer stents and greater asymmetric stent expansion may be important determinants of thrombus formation after SES implantation. In this small cohort, the presence of thrombus did not increase the risk of major adverse cardiac events.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcin.2009.03.003

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278971000014

    View details for PubMedID 19463471

  • Intraoperative Fluorescence Imaging System for On-Site Assessment of Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING Waseda, K., Ako, J., Hasegawa, T., Shimada, Y., Ikeno, F., Ishikawa, T., Demura, Y., Hatada, K., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J., Takahashi, M. 2009; 2 (5): 604-612

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the intraoperative fluorescence imaging (IFI) system in the real-time assessment of graft patency during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft.Intraoperative fluorescence imaging is an intraoperative angiography-like imaging modality using fluorescent indocyanine green excited with laser light. Recently, assessment of graft patency using the IFI system was introduced into clinical use. The feasibility and efficacy of IFI technology in off-pump coronary artery bypass graft has not been systematically compared with other conventional diagnostic modalities.Patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft received IFI analysis, intraoperative transit time flowmetry, and postoperative X-ray angiography. In off-line IFI analysis, the graft washout was classified based on the number of heartbeats required for indocyanine green washout: fast washout (15 beats).A total of 507 grafts in 137 patients received IFI analysis. Of all the IFI analyses, 379 (75%) grafts were visualized clearly up to the distal anastomosis. With regard to anastomosis location, anterior location was associated with a higher percentage of fully analyzable images (90%). More than 80% of images were analyzable, irrespective of graft type. Six grafts with acceptable transit time flowmetry results were diagnosed with graft failure by IFI, which required on-site graft revision. All revised grafts' patency was confirmed by post-operative X-ray angiography. Conversely, 21 grafts with unsatisfactory transit time flowmetry results demonstrated acceptable patency with IFI. Graft revision was considered unnecessary in these grafts, and 20 grafts (95%) were patent by post-operative X-ray angiography. Compared with slow washout, fast washout was associated with a higher preoperative ejection fraction, use of internal mammary artery grafts, and anterior anastomosis location.The IFI system enables on-site assessment of graft patency, providing both morphologic and functional information. This technique may help reduce procedure-related, early graft failures in off-pump bypass patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcmg.2008.12.028

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287653200013

    View details for PubMedID 19442948

  • Future directions of intravascular ultrasound The Lipid Sakata K, Honda Y 2009; 20 (1): 90-99
  • Cardiovascular imaging: intravascular ultrasound Interventional Cardiology: Current Best Practice Ako J, Yamasaki M, Honda Y, Fitzgerald, PJ 2009: 206-211
  • Drug-euting stents: current developments and future directions Journal of Clinical an Experimental Medicine Nakatani D, Honda Y 2009; 231 (6): 727-731
  • Scieitific support for clinical trials: the role and system of core laboratories in clinical research Coronary Intervention Waseda K, Honda Y 2009; 5 (6): 25-28
  • Primary PCI for STEMI: hypothermia and myocardial regeneration therapy Evidence Based Medicine: Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease 2010-2011 Kume T, Honda Y 2009: 39-43
  • IB-IVUS, Virtual Histology Journal of Clinical Echocardiography Sakata K, Honda Y 2009; 10 (8): 792-802
  • Stent designs for bifurcation lesions: dedicated bifurcation stents Coronary Intervention Sakata K, Honda Y 2009; 5 (3): 33-40
  • Analysis of Left Main Coronary Artery Bifurcation Lesions Treated With Biolimus-Eluting DEVAX AXXESS Plus Nitinol Self-Expanding Stent: Intravascular Ultrasound Results of the AXXENT Trial CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Hasegawa, T., Ako, J., Koo, B., Miyazawa, A., Sakurai, R., Chang, H., Dens, J., Verheye, S., Grube, E., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2009; 73 (1): 34-41

    Abstract

    To assess the efficacy of the AXXESS stent on the treatment of left main coronary artery (LMCA) bifurcation lesions using IVUS.The treatment of LMCA bifurcation lesions remains challenging even with the use of drug-eluting stents. The AXXESS system is a biolimus A9-eluting self-expanding stent, dedicated to the treatment of bifurcation lesions.Data were obtained from the AXXENT trial, a prospective, single-arm, multicenter study designed to evaluate the efficacy of the AXXESS stent on the treatment of LMCA bifurcation lesions. IVUS was available in 26 cases at 6-months follow-up. Volumetric and cross-sectional analyses within the AXXESS stent, and cross-sectional analyses at the ostia of left anterior descending (LAD) and left circumflex coronary arteries (LCX) were performed.Within the AXXESS stent, percent neointimal volume obstruction was (3.0 +/- 4.1)% with a minimal lumen area of 10.3 +/- 2.6 mm(2). AXXESS stent volume showed an 12.4% increase at follow-up compared with postprocedure (P = 0.04). Lumen area was significantly smaller in the LCX ostium compared with the LAD ostium at follow-up (3.6 +/- 1.3 mm(2) vs. 5.5 +/- 2.0 mm(2), P = 0.0112). There was greater neointimal formation in the LCX ostium compared with the LAD ostium (1.37 +/- 1.20 mm(2) vs. 0.30 +/- 0.36 mm(2), P = 0.0003).The AXXESS stent in the LMCA showed enlargement through 6-months follow-up and significant neointimal suppression. Greater neointimal formation and relatively inadequate stent expansion may contribute to luminal narrowing in the LCX ostium.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.21765

    View details for Web of Science ID 000262119700006

    View details for PubMedID 19089934

  • Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis of Small-Vessel Lesions Treated with Novel Ultra-Low Profile, Guidewire-Based Self-Expanding Stent System JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Koo, B., Yamasaki, M., Ako, J., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J., Abizaid, A., Whitbourn, R. J. 2008; 20 (12): 647-650

    Abstract

    This study was performed to evaluate the long-term vascular response of the first series of patients treated by a novel ultra-low profile, guidewire-based self-expanding stent system (Sparrow stent) using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).The long-term vascular response and stent geometry change after self-expanding stent implantation are not known.The CARE 1 trial was a single-arm feasibility study of the Sparrow stent in patients with small-vessel disease. Twenty patients were included in this prospective IVUS study, and serial volumetric IVUS analysis was performed after stent implantation and at 6- and 12-months follow up.Serial volumetric IVUS analysis was available in 13 cases between post-procedure and 6- month follow up and in 6 cases between 6- and 12-month follow up. At 6-month follow up, % neointimal volume was 34 +/- 9%. Stent volume index was increased by 13% , negating part of the luminal loss due to neointimal hyperplasia. There was no correlation between % neointimal volume index and % change in stent volume index (p = 0.7). No additional change occurred in any IVUS parameter between 6 and 12 months after stent implantation.In this small feasibility study, the use of a novel guidewire-based self-expanding stent was associated with the same degree of neointimal response as that seen with conventional bare-metal stents. Through serial analyses, the IVUS parameters of both the stent and the vessel remained unchanged beyond 6 months after stent implantation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000207739500007

    View details for PubMedID 19057028

  • Serial angiographic and intravascular ultrasound analysis of late stent strut fracture of sirolimus-eluting stents in native coronary arteries INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Yamada, K. P., Koizumi, T., Yamaguchi, H., Kaneda, H., Bonneau, H. N., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2008; 130 (2): 255-259

    Abstract

    Stent fracture in sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) has been reported to be associated with late adverse events. However, a suitable method to diagnose stent fracture is not fully elucidated.One hundred and two consecutive SES implantations were performed in 83 lesions in 56 patients and underwent serial angiography with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. Angiographic stent strut fracture was defined as stent bending with separation of stent struts. Angiographic hinge movement was defined as stent shaft deviation without separation of stent struts. IVUS stent strut dissociation was defined as the disappearance of stent struts in more than one cross-sectional image which were previously visualized at baseline.By angiography, no cases of stent fracture were detected at 6 months. One case of angiographic hinge movement was found at 12 months. However, three instances of stent fracture were detected by IVUS at 6 months. One case of stent fracture showed a patent lumen area at 6 months but subsequently developed late stent restenosis at 12 months. The other two cases were associated with in-stent restenosis at 6 months.Compared to angiography, IVUS can more reliably detect stent fracture during follow-up evaluation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2007.08.082

    View details for Web of Science ID 000260757600021

    View details for PubMedID 18096257

  • Impact of Additional Ballooning on Plaque Prolapse After Stent Implantation in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING Kaneda, H., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2008; 1 (6): 815-815

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jcmg.2008.09.003

    View details for Web of Science ID 000207650100017

    View details for PubMedID 19356522

  • Two-Year Intravascular Ultrasound Observations in Diabetic Patients Treated with Single and Double Dose Sirolimus-Eluting Stents: Results of the Double Dose Diabetes (3D) Study JOURNAL OF INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY Hur, S., Ako, J., Shimada, Y., Tsujino, I., Hassan, A. H., Abizaid, A., Shiran, A., Lewis, B. S., Guagliumi, G., Cohen, S. A., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J., Eduardo Sousa, J. 2008; 20 (8): 411-416

    Abstract

    Diabetes has been reported as an independent predictor of restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term impact of increased drug dose in sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) on neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) in diabetic patients using volumetric intravascular ultrasound analysis.The 3D trial is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, feasibility study of double-dose (280 microg/cm2) or conventional single-dose (140 microg/cm2) SES for the treatment of de novo coronary lesions in diabetic patients. To evaluate long-term efficacy, complete serial volumetric analyses (baseline, 6-month and 2-year follow up) were performed in 39 diabetic patients (17 single-dose, 22 double-dose). Each volume was divided by stent length to acquire volume index, expressed as mm3/mm. Percent neointimal volume was calculated as (neointimal volume/stent volume) x 100 at follow up.Volumetric analysis showed similar results over time between the 2 stent groups (p = NS for all). At 2-year follow up, minimal increases in NIH area and percent NIH were observed in both groups, which translated into a decrease in lumen volume index compared to baseline (p < 0.05 for all). No late-acquired incomplete stent apposition was observed in either group.The current single dose of sirolimus in SES is effective in inhibiting NIH in diabetic patients up to 2 years. In this patient subset, double-dose SES did not confer additional NIH suppression at 2-year follow up compared to conventional single-dose SES.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000207739100009

    View details for PubMedID 18688066

  • Novel guidewire-based stent-delivery system: Examination by intravascular ultrasound CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Yamasaki, M., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Hassan, A., Koo, B., Abizaid, A., Fitzgerald, P., Whitbourn, R. 2008; 72 (1): 47-51

    Abstract

    This report describes the first-in-man experience with a novel 0.014-in. guidewire-based, self-expanding stent delivery system designed for small or tortuous coronary arteries that may be difficult to access with conventional stent-delivery systems.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.21562

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257306300010

    View details for PubMedID 18412249

  • Frontiers in intravascular Imaging technologies CIRCULATION Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2008; 117 (15): 2024-2037
  • Effect of lumen narrowing within sirolimus-eluting stents on proximal and distal vessel segments CIRCULATION JOURNAL Waseda, K., Ako, J., Kaneda, H., Miyazawa, A., Shimada, Y., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2008; 72 (4): 534-537

    Abstract

    Flow dynamics and shear stress may influence downstream vessel segments. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of lumen narrowing within sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) on vessel response at adjacent reference sites.In 135 patients after SES implantation, minimal lumen area (MLA) within the stent and average lumen area at distal or proximal adjacent reference segments (5 mm) were obtained at baseline and follow up. In the smaller in-stent MLA group (MLA <3 mm(2)), lumen area decreased significantly at the distal reference compared with the larger in-stent MLA group (MLA >or=3 mm(2)), although no significant difference was seen at the proximal reference.In-stent lumen patency may influence vascular responses at adjacent reference segments after SES implantation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000254468800005

    View details for PubMedID 18362421

  • Coronary risk factors and coronary atheroma burden at severely narrowing segments INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Kataoka, T., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2008; 124 (1): 124-126

    Abstract

    While only few data exist correlating cardiovascular risk factors with volumetric measurements of coronary atheroma burden in patients with coronary artery disease, a recent report using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) demonstrated independent predictors of atherosclerotic burden in a native coronary artery with relatively mild narrowing (20-50% diameter stenosis by visual estimation). The purpose of this study was to examine whether cardiovascular risk factors can predict atherosclerotic burden at severely narrowing segments (>50% diameter stenosis).Patients who met the criteria (high-quality, automated pull-back IVUS images of severely narrowing segments prior to intervention) were identified from the IVUS database of the Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory at Stanford University. Using commercially available planimetry software, lumen and vessel inside external elastic membrane areas were manually traced at every 0.5-mm interval in diseased segments. Using Simpson's method, vessel, lumen, and plaque (vessel minus lumen) volumes were calculated, and average area was calculated as volume data divided by length. Percent plaque volume was computed as plaque volume divided by vessel volume. Multiple linear regression analysis with backward selection was used to determine the risk factors for atherosclerotic burden.For percent plaque volume, diabetes or hypertension were predictors of more severe disease. For average plaque area, male gender or diabetes were predictors of more severe disease. These variables were also independent predictors in multivariate regression models.Male gender, hypertension, and diabetes are also strong independent predictors of atherosclerotic burden in coronary disease patients, though analyzed segments and disease severity were different.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2006.11.194

    View details for Web of Science ID 000253546900022

    View details for PubMedID 17350700

  • Comparison of vascular response to zotarolimus-eluting stent versus sirolimus-eluting stent: Intravascular ultrasound results from ENDEAVOR III AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL Miyazawa, A., Ako, J., Hongo, Y., Hur, S., Tsujino, I., Courtney, B. K., Hassan, A. H., Kandzari, D. E., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2008; 155 (1): 108-113

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vascular response of zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES) and sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).Data were obtained from the Endeavor Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent System Versus the Center Siromlimus-Eluting Coronary Stent System in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (ENDEAVOR) III trial, a randomized study comparing ZES and SES for the treatment of de novo native coronary artery lesions. Serial (baseline and 8-month follow-up) IVUS was available in 258 patients (190 ZES, 68 SES).At 8 months, ZES had greater percentage of neointimal volume index (ZES 1.1 +/- 0.8 mm3/mm vs SES 0.2 +/- 0.1 mm3/mm, P < .01), resulting in smaller lumen volume index (6.0 +/- 2.0 mm3/mm vs 7.0 +/- 2.1 mm3/mm, P < .05). Zotarolimus-eluting stents showed larger IVUS-detectable neointimal coverage over stent surface (50.2% vs 10.5%, P < .01) and greater mean neointimal thickness (0.19 +/- 0.07 mm vs 0.10 +/- 0.06 mm, P < .01). Zotarolimus-eluting stents had a significantly lower incidence of late-acquired incomplete stent apposition.Zotarolimus-eluting stent is associated with a significantly greater amount of neointimal hyperplasia compared with SES. This amount of hyperplasia in ZES is distributed throughout the stent at 8-month follow-up.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ahj.2007.08.008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251732400017

    View details for PubMedID 18082499

  • Characterization of late incomplete stent apposition: a comparison among bare-metal stents, intracoronary radiation and sirolimus-eluting stents. journal of invasive cardiology Miyazawa, A., Tsujino, I., Ako, J., Shimada, Y., Courtney, B. K., Sakurai, R., Nakamura, M., Okura, H., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 19 (12): 515-518

    Abstract

    Late incomplete stent apposition (LISA) develops following implantation of conventional bare-metal stents (BMS) or drug-eluting stents, or after adjunctive intracoronary radiation (IR). However, no study has systematically compared the morphology of LISA seen with various treatment modalities.To compare the morphometric features of LISA accompanying BMS, IR or sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).A query of Stanford University's IVUS database of the Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory was performed to identify LISA cases. Dedicated software programs were used for volumetric IVUS analyses.In 30 LISA cases (12 BMS, 6 IR and 12 SES), there was no intertreatment difference in the degree of LISA (lumen area minus stent area at follow up). Serial analyses of LISA segments showed that vessel area of SES and IR showed significant increase at follow up as compared with post procedure, while there was no significant change in plaque area. In contrast, the BMS group showed no increase in vessel area, whereas plaque area revealed significant reduction. Eight of 12 BMS cases were treated by directional atherectomy before stenting; however, there was no difference in the area change between patients with or without pre-stent atherectomy. Post-procedure plaque thickness beneath the stent struts of LISA was thinner for SES as compared with BMS.Plaque reduction primarily contributes to LISA after BMS, whereas vessel expansion is the predominant factor in LISA development for IR and SES. Thus, the mechanism of LISA may vary among different interventional treatments.

    View details for PubMedID 18180522

  • Analysis of bifurcation lesions treated with novel drug-eluting dedicated bifurcation stent system: Intravascular ultrasound results of the AXXESS PLUS trial CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Miyazawa, A., Ako, J., Hassan, A., Hasegawa, T., Abizaid, A., Verheye, S., McClean, D., Neumann, F. J., Grube, E., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 70 (7): 952-957

    Abstract

    The aim of this intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) study was to assess the efficacy of the AXXESS Plus stent system for the treatment of bifurcation coronary lesions.The AXXESS Plus is a novel bifurcation drug-eluting stent, comprised of a self-expanding flare-shaped stent platform and bioabsorbable polymer coating that releases Biolimus A9.Data were obtained from the AXXESS PLUS trial, a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized, single-arm study to evaluate safety and efficacy. Six-month follow-up IVUS analysis was available in 49 cases. Volumetric analysis using Simpson's method within the AXXESS stent, and cross-sectional analysis at the ostium of main branch and/or side branch was performed. Impact of bifurcation angle on stent expansion at the carina was also evaluated. Results: Within the AXXESS stent, neointimal volume obstruction percentage was 2.3% +/- 2.2%, with a minimum lumen area of 7.9 +/- 2.6 mm(2). Lumen area was 5.2 +/- 1.7 mm(2) at main branch ostium, and 4.0 +/- 1.5 mm(2) at side branch ostium. In two cases, incomplete stent apposition was observed at the proximal edge of the AXXESS stent. In one case, a gap between the AXXESS stent and an additional stent was observed. Greater bifurcation angle inversely correlated with smaller stent area at side branch ostium (r = -0.54, P = 0.03) but not at main branch ostium (r = -0.2, P = 0.29).This novel self-expanding, drug-eluting bifurcation stent demonstrated effective lesion coverage along with significant neointimal suppression equivalent to current generation balloon-expandable drug-eluting stent technology.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.21269

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251442900009

    View details for PubMedID 18044777

  • Efficacy of reduced-dose sirofimus-eluting stems on the human coronary artery: Serial IVUS analysis of neointimal hyperplasia and luminal dimension CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Nakamura, M., Abizaid, A., Hirohata, A., Honda, Y., Sousa, E., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 70 (7): 946-951

    Abstract

    Using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), the efficacy of reduced-dose sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs) in the prevention of neointimal hyperplasia (NH) and maintenance of luminal patency in human coronary arteries was evaluated.In the animal model, a broad therapeutic window regarding sirolimus doses in suppressing NH has been reported.Serial cross-sectional and volumetric IVUS analyses were performed in 44 patients treated with SES that contained lower sirolimus doses (either 45% or 70%) than standard SES. For cross-sectional analysis, minimum lumen area (MLA) was measured. Percent (%) NH volumetric obstruction was calculated as 100 x NH volume/stent volume.IVUS measurements were similar between the two drug-dose groups. At 12 months follow-up, only one case developed late incomplete stent apposition. Between 4 and 12 months, a slight increase of in-stent % area loss and % NH obstruction was noted (3.5% +/- 10.4% to 6.7% +/- 10.7% and 1.9% +/- 5.0% to 4.4% +/- 8.0%, respectively). The majority of studied cases, however, sustained less than a 10% volumetric (93% of studied cases) and area loss (75% of studied cases) in the stented segment up to 12 months. At 12 months, % area loss within the stented segments and 5-mm reference segments were comparable (7.0% +/- 19.6% versus 6.7% +/- 10.7%).Although slight increases of NH were noted, SESs, delivering two reduced drug doses, appeared to be effective for maintaining luminal patency during 12 months follow-up.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.21272

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251442900008

    View details for PubMedID 17621671

  • Determinants of lumen loss between years 1 and 2 after cardiac transplantation TRANSPLANTATION Sakurai, R., Yamasaki, M., Nakamura, M., Hirohata, A., Honda, Y., Bonneau, H. N., Luikart, H., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yeung, A. C., Valantine, H. A., Fearon, W. F. 2007; 84 (9): 1097-1102

    Abstract

    We previously reported that negative remodeling, not plaque progression, correlated with lumen loss during the first year after cardiac transplantation and that cytomegalovirus antibody seropositivity correlated with increased negative remodeling and greater lumen loss. Whether these findings persist between years 1 and 2 after transplantation is unknown.Serial 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound analysis in the left anterior descending coronary artery was performed in 30 cardiac transplant recipients at year 1 and 2 after transplantation. Vessel, lumen, and plaque area were determined at 0.5-mm axial intervals in the first 50 mm of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and volumes were computed using Simpson's method. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify clinical predictors of change in coronary dimensions.Although mean vessel area did not change (13.6+/-3.4 to 13.4+/-3.3 mm/mm(3), P=0.45), mean plaque area increased (3.4+/-2.3 to 3.8+/-2.2 mm/mm(3), P=0.012), resulting in significant mean lumen area loss (10.3+/-2.5 to 9.6+/-2.3 mm/mm(3), P=0.016). However, the degree of luminal change strongly correlated with the degree of change in vessel size (R=0.81, P<0.0001), but not with change in plaque amount (R=-0.19, P=0.32). In fact, in 57% of the patients who demonstrated lumen loss, negative remodeling contributed more to lumen loss than did plaque progression. Diabetes at 2 years was the only significant independent clinical predictor of plaque progression and lumen loss.Despite significant plaque progression, negative remodeling correlated with coronary lumen loss between years 1 and 2 after cardiac transplantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/01.tp.0000285987.27033.65

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251030600006

    View details for PubMedID 17998863

  • Design criteria for the ideal drug-eluting Stent AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Ako, J., Bonneau, H. N., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 100 (8B): 3M-9M

    Abstract

    The deployment of drug-eluting stents (DESs) is an integral treatment option for patients with coronary artery disease. Although the development and testing of the first-generation DESs focused to a considerable degree on efficacy parameters, including restenosis, recent concerns over late clinical events have prompted a refinement of the design criteria for succeeding generations of these devices. This review assesses design criteria for the ideal DES from 3 complementary perspectives: deliverability, efficacy, and safety. Most new investigational balloon-expandable DES systems have lowered crossing profiles by thinning stent struts using a cobalt chromium alloy, while investigational self-expanding DESs often use nitinol as the platform material. Stents designed to be fully biodegradable are also being developed, with deliverability and performance to be determined in future clinical trials. Refinements in bifurcation-dedicated stents will secure branch accessibility to offer better deliverability in complex lesion morphologies. Experimentation in stent design is already realizing multiple-lesion stenting and the in situ customization of stent length. Rather than simply targeting further reductions in restenosis rates, efforts to improve efficacy are shifting toward a lesion-specific approach, including the design of stents dedicated to bifurcation lesions. Another future direction is a disease-specific approach, or an approach using DESs as local drug-delivery devices. The identification of long-term safety issues with the first-generation DESs has reignited clinical interest in the development of stents that are more biologically based, including fully biodegradable stents and stents using biomimetic and biodegradable polymers. Important performance criteria for future DES agents include more cell-type specificity, broader safety margins, and greater facility at promoting endothelialization and healing.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.08.016

    View details for Web of Science ID 000250759000002

    View details for PubMedID 17950830

  • Intravascular ultrasound findings in ENDEAVOR II and ENDEAVOR III AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Sakurai, R., Bonneau, H. N., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 100 (8B): 71M-76M

    Abstract

    The results of 2 randomized controlled trials of the Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES; Medtronic Vascular, Santa Rosa, CA) were recently reported: ENDEAVOR II, in which the Endeavor stent was compared with the Driver bare metal stent (BMS; Medtronic Vascular), and ENDEAVOR III, in which the Endeavor stent was compared with the first-generation Cypher sirolimus-eluting stent (SES; Cordis Corporation, Miami Lakes, FL). To examine in detail the vascular responses to the Endeavor stent, serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analyses were performed in subsets of patients in the 2 trials at baseline and 8-month follow-up. The investigators report results for various IVUS parameters and compare those with published results for the first-generation SES and paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES). The ZES demonstrated significantly improved effectiveness and equivalent safety compared with the BMS in ENDEAVOR II. Although the ZES seems to be slightly less effective at inhibiting intimal hyperplasia than the SES and PES, early results are indicative of an acceptable safety profile. This finding may be due in part to the relatively complete and uniform neointimal coverage associated with the ZES.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.08.025

    View details for Web of Science ID 000250759000010

    View details for PubMedID 17950835

  • Detailed intravascular ultrasound analysis of Zotarolimus-eluting phosphorylcholine-coated cobalt-chromium alloy stent in de Novo Coronary lesions (results from the ENDEAVOR II trial) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Sakurai, R., Hongo, Y., Yamasaki, M., Honda, Y., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Cutlip, D., Popma, J. J., Zimetbaum, P., Fajadet, J., Kuntz, R. E., Wijns, W., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 100 (5): 818-823

    Abstract

    Zotarolimus-eluting phosphorylcholine-coated cobalt-chromium alloy Driver stents (ZES) demonstrated significant reductions in target lesion revascularization rate with few apparent adverse events compared with bare metal stents (BMS; uncoated Driver stents) in a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial in de novo coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to examine detailed vascular responses to ZES compared with BMS using serial intravascular ultrasound analysis. A total of 343 patients (ZES n = 178, BMS n = 165) were enrolled in this formal, prespecified intravascular ultrasound substudy of the Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Medtronic AVE Zotarolimus-Eluting Driver Coronary Stent in de Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (ENDEAVOR II), a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial to compare ZES and BMS in de novo native coronary artery lesions. Quantitative and qualitative intravascular ultrasound analyses were performed postprocedurally and at 8-month follow-up in stented and reference segments. ZES showed significantly less neointima, with a larger lumen than BMS at 8 months (percentage neointimal volume 17.6 +/- 10.1% vs 29.4 +/- 17.2%, p <0.0001; maximum percentage neointimal area 32.9 +/- 13.0% vs 47.6 +/- 18.6%, p <0.0001; minimum luminal area 4.9 +/- 1.6 vs 4.0 +/- 1.7 mm(2), p <0.0001) and no unfavorable edge effect. In the 18-mm single stents, ZES showed evenly inhibited neointima compared with BMS. Neither persistent stent-edge dissection nor late-acquired incomplete stent apposition was observed in either group. In conclusion, ZES showed evenly inhibited neointima with no apparent adverse vascular response in stented and reference segments at 8 months compared with BMS.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.04.016

    View details for Web of Science ID 000249226100013

    View details for PubMedID 17719326

  • Neointimal progression and luminal narrowing in sirolimus-eluting stent treatment for bare metal in-stent restenosis: A quantitative intravascular ultrasound analysis AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL Sakurai, R., Ako, J., Hassan, A. H., Bonneau, H. N., Neumann, F., Desmet, W., Holmes, D. R., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2007; 154 (2): 361-365

    Abstract

    Recurrent restenosis may occur after drug-eluting stent implantation for in-stent restenosis (ISR) of bare metal stents (BMSs), especially in areas involving drug-eluting stent gaps.To investigate the details of neointimal progression and luminal narrowing after the treatment of ISR using sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs), serial intravascular ultrasound analysis was performed in 65 patients with ISR at postintervention and at 6-month follow-up. The total stented segment was categorized into 3 compartments: new SES (N), new SES and old BMS overlap (N/O), and old BMS (O). In each of the 190 compartments, serial intravascular ultrasound parameters were analyzed at the cross section of the maximum change in neointimal area (delta neointimal area) from postintervention to follow-up or the minimum lumen area at follow-up if delta neointimal area was 0. Minimum lumen area in each compartment was also investigated serially.At postintervention, lumen area was the smallest in compartment N/O (N 5.8 +/- 1.5, N/O 5.1 +/- 1.3, O 6.0 +/- 1.4 mm2, P = .005). Not only the average of maximum delta neointimal area (N 0.2 +/- 0.4, N/O 0.2 +/- 0.4, O 0.8 +/- 1.0 mm2, P < .0001) but also the frequency of minimum lumen area decreasing from > or = 4.0 mm2 at postintervention to < 4.0 mm2 at follow-up (N 4.0%, N/O 5.1%, O 23.5%, P = .012) was the largest in compartment O.Neointimal progression and consequent luminal narrowing tend to occur where BMS is uncovered with SES in treatment of ISR, even in the absence of an obvious stenosis at postintervention.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ahj.2007.04.023

    View details for Web of Science ID 000248511000025

    View details for PubMedID 17643589

  • The risks and benefits of drug-eluting stents. The American heart hospital journal Shimohama, T., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 5 (3): 146-150

    View details for PubMedID 17673855

  • Comparison of nonuniform strut distribution between two drug-eluting stent platforms. journal of invasive cardiology Hasegawa, T., Ako, J., Ikeno, F., Waseda, K., Suzuki, Y., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 19 (6): 244-246

    Abstract

    To compare the difference of strut distribution between two clinically available drug-eluting stent platforms (Bx Velocity and Express II stents) using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).Nonuniform strut distribution (NSD) has been shown to be associated with increased intimal hyperplasia after drug-eluting stent implantation.IVUS imaging was performed on Bx Velocity (n = 6) and Express II stents (n = 6) after inflation pressures of 10, 16, and 26 atm in a bench test model. Percent NSD was defined as the length of segments with NSD (interstrut angle > 90 degrees) divided by stent length. NSD was also assessed in postprocedure IVUS images in 53 clinical cases (32 Cypher, 21 Taxus) using 3-dimensional IVUS analysis.Frequency of NSD segment and %NSD were lower in Bx Velocity stents than in Express II stents at the inflation pressures of 16 and 26 atm (%NSD: 16 atm, 0% vs. 13.8 +/- 9.4%; p < 0.005; 26 atm, 1.1 +/- 2.6% vs. 19.9 +/- 6.9% p < 0.0001). In postprocedural images from clinical cases, the frequency of NSD segment and %NSD were lower in Cypher stents than in Taxus stents (%NSD: 0.5 +/- 1.6 vs. 6.8 +/- 7.2; p < 0.0001).NSD segment was observed less in Bx Velocity stents than in Express II stents.

    View details for PubMedID 17541122

  • Changes in coronary anatomy and physiology after heart transplantation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Hirohata, A., Nakamura, M., Waseda, K., Honda, Y., Lee, D. P., Vagelos, R. H., Hunt, S. A., Valantine, H. A., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yeung, A. C., Fearon, W. F. 2007; 99 (11): 1603-1607

    Abstract

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a progressive process involving the epicardial and microvascular coronary systems. The timing of the development of abnormalities in these 2 compartments and the correlation between changes in physiology and anatomy are undefined. The invasive evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and physiology with intravascular ultrasound, fractional flow reserve, coronary flow reserve, and the index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was performed in the left anterior descending coronary artery during 151 angiographic evaluations of asymptomatic heart transplant recipients from 0 to >5 years after heart transplantation (HT). There was no angiographic evidence of significant CAV, but during the first year after HT, fractional flow reserve decreased significantly (0.89 +/- 0.06 vs 0.85 +/- 0.07, p = 0.001), and percentage plaque volume derived by intravascular ultrasound increased significantly (15.6 +/- 7.7% to 22.5 +/- 12.3%, p = 0.0002), resulting in a significant inverse correlation between epicardial physiology and anatomy (r = -0.58, p <0.0001). The IMR was lower in these patients compared with those > or =2 years after HT (24.1 +/- 14.3 vs 29.4 +/- 18.8 units, p = 0.05), suggesting later spread of CAV to the microvasculature. As the IMR increased, fractional flow reserve increased (0.86 +/- 0.06 to 0.90 +/- 0.06, p = 0.0035 comparing recipients with IMRs < or =20 to those with IMRs > or =40), despite no difference in percentage plaque volume (21.0 +/- 11.2% vs 20.5 +/- 10.5%, p = NS). In conclusion, early after HT, anatomic and physiologic evidence of epicardial CAV was found. Later after HT, the physiologic effect of epicardial CAV may be less, because of increased microvascular dysfunction.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.01.039

    View details for Web of Science ID 000247121700024

    View details for PubMedID 17531589

  • Serial intravascular ultrasonic study of outcomes of coronary culprit lesions with plaque rupture following bare metal stent implantation in patients with angina pectoris AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Hur, S., Hassan, A. H., Rekhi, R., Ako, J., Shimada, Y., Nakamura, M., Yamasaki, M., Bonneau, H. N., Sudhir, K., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 99 (10): 1394-1398

    Abstract

    Coronary culprit lesions with plaque rupture (PR) have been treated with different coronary interventions. However, it is unknown whether the presence of PR affects the restenotic process after coronary intervention. One hundred forty-two patients undergoing coronary bare metal stent implantation were enrolled in the present retrospective analysis. Case selection was based on availability of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and quantitative coronary angiographic examinations at baseline (before and after intervention) and at follow-up. Serial comparative analyses included qualitative and quantitative features of the culprit lesion and reference segments. PR was defined as an intraplaque cavity in communication with the lumen in the presence of a residual, disrupted cap. Patients were categorized according to the presence/absence of PR. Pre-interventional IVUS detected PR in 54 patients (38%). Baseline patient demographics were similar between the +PR and -PR groups. Quantitative IVUS analysis showed higher rates of positive remodeling and larger vessel and plaque areas in the +PR compared with -PR lesions (p <0.001 for all). At follow-up (7.2 +/- 2.6 months), no statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups in quantitative coronary angiographic or IVUS measurements. In conclusion, culprit lesions with PR exhibited larger plaque mass and higher rates of positive remodeling at preintervention IVUS examination. However, when treated with bare metal stents, the absence/presence of preintervention PR was not found to affect the rate or severity of in-stent restenosis in these culprit lesions.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.12.067

    View details for Web of Science ID 000246715900010

    View details for PubMedID 17493467

  • Drug delivery via nano-, micro and macroporous coronary stent surfaces EXPERT OPINION ON DRUG DELIVERY Tsujino, I., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 4 (3): 287-295

    Abstract

    Drug-eluting stents (DESs) have revolutionized the treatment of occlusive coronary artery disease via marked reduction of in-stent restenosis. One critical feature for successful DESs is the sustained release of drugs, which is achieved using a polymer coating in the present generation of DESs. However, recent studies have raised a concern that polymers may trigger allergic reactions and/or prolonged inflammation in some patients. These untoward reactions may eventually lead to undesirable clinical events, including stent thrombosis and sudden cardiac death. A new drug delivery technology, using a porous stent surface, may offer desirable drug elution properties without the use of polymers, and may translate into an improved safety profile for the next-generation DESs.

    View details for DOI 10.1517/17425247.4.3.287

    View details for Web of Science ID 000252856900008

    View details for PubMedID 17489655

  • Comparison of vessel response following sirolimus-eluting stent implantation as assessed by serial 3-D intravascular ultrasound study. journal of invasive cardiology Waseda, K., Ako, J., Shimada, Y., Morino, Y., Tsujino, I., Hongo, Y., Sudhir, K., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2007; 19 (4): 171-173

    Abstract

    Recent sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) studies have suggested higher rates of restenosis in non-left anterior descending (LAD) artery lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate differential vessel response (LAD versus non-LAD) to SES implantation using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). A total of 94 patients who underwent SES implantation and serial (post-PCI and 8 months) 3-dimensional IVUS were enrolled from our database. Volumetric analysis was performed throughout the stent as well as the adjacent reference segment (up to 5 mm). Volume index (volume/length) was calculated for vessel (VVI), lumen (LVI), and plaque (PVI). Cross-sectional narrowing (CSN) was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area (%). With respect to the in-stent segment, VVI, PVI, and LVI at post-PCI were not significantly different between the LAD (n = 41) and non-LAD (n = 53) lesions. At follow up, however, maximum CSN was significantly greater in the non-LAD lesions (18.3 +/- 15.2% versus 12.2 +/- 10.0%; p = 0.029). At the proximal reference segment, the non-LAD lesions showed a significantly greater LVI decrease than the LAD lesions (p <0.05), primarily due to mild vessel shrinkage observed in the non-LAD lesions. There were no significant differences at the distal reference segment between the LAD and non-LAD lesions. This detailed IVUS analysis suggests that there are minimal differences in the vessel responses following SES implantation. These findings may have potential implications for mechanical and pharmacokinetic properties of next-generation drug-eluting stent technology.

    View details for PubMedID 17404402

  • Impact of gender on neointimal hyperplasia following coronary artery stenting AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Ako, J., Kataoka, T., Takahashi, T., Terashima, M., Waseda, K., Miyazawa, A., Hassan, A. H., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2007; 99 (4): 491-493

    Abstract

    Whether gender affects long-term outcomes after bare metal stent implantation remains controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of gender on neointimal hyperplasia in a large cohort of patients after stent implantation using 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound. Lumen and stent areas were manually traced at 0.5-mm intervals throughout the stented segment. Using Simpson's method, lumen, stent, and neointimal (stent - lumen) volumes were calculated and standardized by stent length. Women were older, presented more often with hyperlipidemia or hypertension, and had smaller reference vessel diameter and mean stent area, compared with men. Although neointimal hyperplasia and neointimal thickness in women were similar to that in men, the percentage of neointimal hyperplasia (neointimal area divided by stent area) was higher in women due to the smaller stent area. After adjusting for stent area, the percentage of neointimal hyperplasia did not differ by gender. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that neointimal hyperplasia after bare metal stent implantation in women is similar to that seen in men. Despite the similarity in outcome, there are several gender-specific differences in baseline characteristics.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.09.094

    View details for Web of Science ID 000244514500014

    View details for PubMedID 17293191

  • Intravascular ultrasound Cardiovasuclar Medicine Hur SH, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ, Yock PG 2007: 1797-1810
  • Future directions of drug-eluting stents in the treatment of acute coronary syndrome Coronary Intervention Waseda K, Honda Y 2007; 3 (1): 94-99
  • Intravascular ultrasound Textbook of Interventional Cardiology Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ, Yock PG 2007: 1115-1142
  • Comparison of the efficacy of direct coronary stenting with sirolimus-eluting stents versus stenting with predilation by intravascular ultrasound imaging (from the DIRECT trial) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Hirohata, A., Morino, Y., Ako, J., Sakurai, R., Buchbinder, M., Caputo, R. P., Karas, S. P., Mishkel, G. J., Mooney, M. R., O'Shaughnessy, C. D., Raizner, A. E., Wilensky, R. L., Williams, D. O., Wong, S., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Moses, J. W., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 98 (11): 1464-1467

    Abstract

    A direct coronary stenting technique using drug-eluting stents may decrease drug-eluting stent efficacy due to possible damage to the surface coating of the stent. The DIRECT is a multicenter, prospective, nonrandomized trial designed to evaluate the direct stenting strategy for the sirolimus-eluting Bx-Velocity stent compared with the historical control (SIRIUS trial, stenting with predilation). Volumetric and cross-sectional intravascular ultrasound analyses at 8-month follow-up were performed in 115 patients (DIRECT n= 64, control n = 51). Patient and lesion characteristics were comparable between groups. The DIRECT group achieved an equivalent uniform expansion index, defined as minimum stent area/maximum stent area x 100, compared with the control group (65.9 +/- 11.7 vs 63.1 +/- 12.7, p = NS). At 8-month follow-up, vessel, stent, lumen, and neointimal volume index (volume in cubic millimeters/length in millimeters) and percent neointimal volume were similar between the DIRECT and control groups (vessel volume index 13.9 +/- 4.40 vs 15.0 +/- 3.83; stent volume index 6.83 +/- 2.02 vs 6.94 +/- 2.04; lumen volume index 6.71 +/- 2.04 vs 6.81 +/- 2.07; neointimal volume index 0.14 +/- 0.24 vs 0.16 +/- 0.23; percent neointimal volume 3.73 +/- 6.97 vs 3.14 +/- 5.32, p = NS for all). In addition, in-stent neointimal hyperplasia distribution was significantly smaller near the distal stent edge (0.22 vs 0.098 mm(3)/mm, p = 0.01 for an average neointimal volume index within 3 mm from the distal stent edge). In conclusion, direct coronary stenting with the sirolimus-eluting Bx-Velocity stent is equally effective in terms of uniform stent expansion and long-term quantitative intravascular ultrasound results compared with conventional stenting using predilation. This strategy appears to be associated with less neointimal hyperplasia near the distal stent edge.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.06.046

    View details for Web of Science ID 000242595300010

    View details for PubMedID 17126651

  • Predictors of recurrent in-stent restenosis after beta-radiation: An analysis from the START 40/20 trial. Journal of interventional cardiology Kaneda, H., Honda, Y., Morino, Y., Lansky, A. J., Yock, P. G., Bonan, R., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 19 (5): 376-380

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors, including clinical, procedural, angiographic, and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) parameters, for recurrent in-stent restenosis (ISR) following beta-radiation 90Strontium/Yttrium (90Sr/Y) in a large multicenter trial.Although adjunct brachytherapy reduces recurrent ISR after primary catheter-based intervention, recurrence of stenosis after brachytherapy still occurs.We analyzed 185 IVUS cohort patients in the STent And Restenosis Therapy (START) 40/20 trial where a 40-mm, 90Sr/Y, radioactive source train was exclusively used for treatment of ISR to be treatable with a 20-mm balloon.Thirty-nine patients underwent target lesion revascularization. Preliminary univariate analysis showed that age, smoking, balloon/artery ratio, geographic miss, minimum lumen diameter, and diameter stenosis at baseline were associated with target lesion revascularization, while none of IVUS variables were (minimum lumen area, minimum stent area, or residual plaque burden). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that younger age, lower balloon/artery ratio, and presence of geographic miss were independent predictors of target lesion revascularization.Even with adjunct beta-radiation therapy, initial mechanical optimization, such as appropriate balloon sizing and positioning, may be critical for the prevention of recurrent ISR.

    View details for PubMedID 17020560

  • Axial plaque redistribution after coronary stent deployment. journal of invasive cardiology Hirohata, A., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. 2006; 18 (8): E225-6

    Abstract

    We report a case of axial plaque redistribution after coronary stent deployment assessed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as well as coronary angiography. A 72-year-old male with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and a nuclear stress test demonstrating anterior and lateral ischemia was admitted for cardiac catheterization. Coronary angiography and IVUS examination revealed eccentric stenoses in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the left circumflex artery (LCx), just before the bifurcation of the first obtuse marginal branch. After successful LAD stent placement, the LCx was also stented, jailing the obtuse marginal branch. Immediately after dilatation, however, the coronary angiogram showed a new significant stenosis at the distal adjacent segment. IVUS examination after administration of nitroglycerin revealed a secondary critical lesion that was not observed before the interventional procedure. A significant plaque increase at the new lesion site presumably resulted from axial plaque redistribution (extrusion from the stented segment, otherwise known as plaque shift). After additional stenting, the patient had an uneventful course.

    View details for PubMedID 16877793

  • Intravascular ultrasonic analysis of atherosclerotic vessel remodeling and plaque distribution of stenotic left anterior descending coronary arterial bifurcation lesions upstream and downstream of the side branch AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Shimada, Y., Courtney, B. K., Nakamura, M., Hongo, Y., Sonoda, S., Hassan, A. H., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 98 (2): 193-196

    Abstract

    Bifurcation lesions remain a challenging lesion subset, even in the era of drug-eluting stents. The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal remodeling pattern and cross-sectional plaque location of bifurcation lesions. Seventy-four preintervention intravascular ultrasound studies of left anterior descending bifurcation lesions were analyzed, in which the lesion was located proximal (type A, n=32) or distal (type B, n=42) to the side branch. Vessel area and plaque area at the lesion (VAlesion and PAlesion) and at the reference site (VAreference and PAreference) were measured. The remodeling ratio was defined as VAlesion/VAreference, and the vessel compensation ratio was defined as (VAlesion-VAreference)/(PAlesion-PAreference). The geometric center of the lumen at the lesion site was identified, and the lesion site was divided into circumferential equal arcs to compare the cross-sectional distribution of percentage plaque area (100x[PAlesion/VAlesion]) between the 2 groups. The remodeling ratio (1.03+/-0.15 vs 0.94+/-0.14, p=0.01) and the vessel compensation ratio (0.0+/-0.36 vs -0.37+/-0.61, p<0.01) were significantly greater in type A than in type B lesions. The circumferential distribution pattern of percentage plaque area was significantly different between the groups (analysis of variance p<0.005), with greater percentage plaque area for the vessel wall opposite from the side branch in type B lesions (46.3+/-18.0% vs 54.6+/-15.4%, type A vs type B lesions, p<0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that a major side branch may affect longitudinal lesion remodeling as well as the circumferential location of atherosclerotic plaque.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2006.01.073

    View details for Web of Science ID 000239185300011

    View details for PubMedID 16828591

  • Safety of beta radiation exposure to the non-target segment: an intravascular ultrasound dosimetric analysis. journal of invasive cardiology Kaneda, H., Honda, Y., Morino, Y., Fox, T., Crocker, I., Lansky, A. J., Yock, P. G., Bonan, R., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 18 (7): 309-312

    Abstract

    The use of longer radioactive seed trains to avoid geographic miss may lead to greater radiation exposure to distal vasculature due to the natural tapering of coronary arteries. The aim of this study was to use IVUS-based dosimetric analysis to evaluate the effect of beta-radiation on angiographically normal, noninjured distal segments.We analyzed 17 in-stent restenosis cases (stent length: 20 +/- 8 mm) treated with a 40 mm 90Sr/Y source train. The prescribed dose was 18.4 Gy (reference less than or equal to 3.3 mm) or 23 Gy (reference > 3.3 mm) at 2 mm from the source. Noninjured, but fully radiated, distal reference sites were determined by angiography. Based upon the three-dimensional vessel contours obtained at baseline, the minimum dose delivered to 90% of plaque volume (Dv90) was determined. Vessel, plaque and lumen volumes and Dv90 were computed in every 2 mm subsegment (n = 52).On average, no significant serial change was observed in plaque area (5.0 +/- 2.5 mm3/mm post-treatment to 5.6 +/- 3.1 mm3/mm at 8-month follow up; p = 0.09), vessel area (10.2 +/- 3.7 to 10.3 +/- 4.0 mm3/mm; p = 0.84), or lumen area (5.2 +/- 2.0 to 4.7 +/- 1.8 mm3/mm; p = 0.19). Subsegment analysis, however, revealed a wide range of dose distribution, with a significant positive correlation between Dv90 and plaque increase (p = 0.008), as well as vessel change (p < 0.001), representing dose-dependent positive vessel remodeling following beta radiation. Consequently, no significant relationship was observed between Dv90 and lumen change.Detailed IVUS-based dosimetric analysis demonstrated that beta radiation promoted positive remodeling, preventing lumen loss despite a mild increase in plaque mass on angiographically normal, noninjured distal segments.

    View details for PubMedID 16816435

  • Influence of plaque calcium on neointimal hyperplasia following bare metal and drug-eluting stent implantation CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Shimada, Y., Kataoka, T., Courtney, B. K., Morino, Y., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Grube, E., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 67 (6): 866-869

    Abstract

    To examine the influence of vessel wall calcium on neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) following bare metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation.While procedural complications with coronary stenting in calcified lesions are well reported, little is known about subsequent NIH on plaque calcium following either BMS or DES implantation.In the Study to COmpare REstenosis Rate between QueST and QuaDDS-QP2 (SCORE) trial, 6 months follow-up volumetric intravascular ultrasound data were available for 41 lesions (BMS, 19; DES, 22). NIH thicknesses on superficial, deep, and noncalcified plaque were calculated at every 0.5 mm intervals over the stented segment. Calcified and less-calcified cross-sections were defined as those containing arcs of plaque calcium > or = 90 degrees and < 90 degrees , respectively.In BMS, mean NIH thickness on both superficial (0.24 +/- 0.23 mm) and deep calcium (0.25 +/- 0.21 mm) was significantly smaller than that of noncalcified plaque (0.31 +/- 0.22 mm) (P < 0.0005). NIH area was significantly smaller in calcified cross-sections compared to less-calcified cross-sections (2.1 +/- 1.2 mm2 vs. 3.1 +/- 1.9 mm2, P < 0.0001). While in contrast, in DES, mean NIH thickness was similar, irrespective of the presence or location of calcium (0.03 +/- 0.05 mm vs. 0.03 +/- 0.06 mm vs. 0.03 +/- 0.05 mm, superficial vs. deep vs. noncalcified plaque, P = NS). NIH area was also similar between calcified and less-calcified cross-sections (0.3 +/- 0.6 mm2 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.6 mm2, P = NS).These results suggest that while plaque calcium may influence NIH following BMS implantation, NIH suppression using DES does not appear to be affected by the presence or location of calcium.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.20708

    View details for Web of Science ID 000238082300005

    View details for PubMedID 16649232

  • Mechanisms of lumen narrowing of saphenous vein bypass grafts 12 months after implantation: An intravascular ultrasound study AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL Kaneda, H., Terashima, M., Takahashi, T., Iversen, S., Felderhoff, T., Grube, E., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 151 (3): 726-729

    Abstract

    Previous long-term (>1 year) studies have suggested that saphenous vein bypass grafts (SVGs) undergo vascular remodeling similar to native coronary arteries. However, early morphologic stages of SVG remodeling have not been characterized in vivo.Thirty SVGs were studied 12 months after implantation using an intravascular ultrasound automated pullback system. Intravascular ultrasound images were analyzed between 10 and 60 mm from the tip of the guide. Lumen area (LA), intima area (IA), and vessel area (VA, defined as the area within the outer border of a hypoechoic intimal layer) were computed at 3 cross sections: the minimum LA (MLA) site and the proximal and distal reference sites. Area changes (Delta) were calculated as the MLA site minus the average of the reference sites.In this cohort, 70% of the MLA sites had a smaller VA than the average references. On average, MLA sites had significantly smaller VA (9.7 +/- 2.9 vs 10.7 +/- 3.2 mm2, P < .01) and larger IA (2.5 +/- 2.1 vs 1.2 +/- 1.3 mm2, P < .01) than at the reference sites. The relative contribution of DeltaVA (-1.0 +/- 1.4 mm2) and DeltaIA (1.3 +/- 1.3 mm2) to lumen compromise (-2.3 +/- 1.4 mm2) were 43% and 57%, respectively. On the other hand, simple linear regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between DeltaIA and DeltaVA (y = -1.7 + 0.52x, r = 0.50, P < .01).Within the first year, the mechanism of lumen compromise in SVG is a combination of negative remodeling and intimal hyperplasia. Positive remodeling is seen in a minority of cases. However, the direction and extent of remodeling correlated with change in intimal thickness.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ahj.2005.05.011

    View details for Web of Science ID 000236353900027

    View details for PubMedID 16504641

  • Heterogeneity of neointimal distribution of in-stent restenosis in patients with diabetes mellitus AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Ako, J., Kataoka, T., Takahashi, T., Terashima, M., Waseda, K., Miyazawa, A., Hassan, A., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 97 (3): 340-342

    Abstract

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent predictor of restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. The pattern of restenosis after bare metal stent implantation in diabetic patients was examined with 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound analysis. Lumen and stent were manually traced at every 0.5-mm interval in stented segments. Using Simpson's method, stent, luminal, and neointimal (stent minus lumen) volumes were calculated and average area was calculated as volume data divided by length. To measure the cross-sectional and longitudinal severities of luminal encroachment by the neointima, percent neointimal area (neointimal area divided by stent area) and neointimal hyperplasia 50 (IH50) (defined as percent stent length with percent neointimal area >50%) were calculated. In 278 patients (68 with diabetes and 210 without diabetes), there was a significantly higher percentage of maximal percent neointimal area with significantly longer percent stent length that was severely encroached by the neointima in diabetic patients. Diabetic patients showed a more heterogenous pattern of the neointima after bare metal stenting, resulting in longer high-grade obstruction segments. This may have important implications for stent design and pharmacokinetic properties of next-generation drug-eluting technology for this complex patient subset.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2005.08.067

    View details for Web of Science ID 000235265400009

    View details for PubMedID 16442392

  • Intravascular imaging techniques Cardiac Catheterization, Angioplasty and Intervention Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ, Yock PG 2006: 371-394
  • Next generation drug-eluting stents Drug-Eluting Stent 2 Honda Y 2006: 100-105
  • Transient left ventricular dysfunction under severe stress: Brain-heart relationship revisited AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Ako, J., Sudhir, K., Farouque, H. M., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2006; 119 (1): 10-17

    Abstract

    Transient left ventricular dysfunction in patients under emotional or physical stress, also known as tako-tsubo-like left ventricular dysfunction, has been recently been recognized as a distinct clinical entity. The aims of this review are to define this phenomenon and to explore its similarities to the left ventricular dysfunction seen in patients with acute brain injury.MEDLINE database, bibliographies of each citation for relevant articles, and consultation with clinical experts were used to examine the clinical picture of tako-tsubo-like left ventricular dysfunction.We identified case series and a systematic review that report on patients with this syndrome. This phenomenon occurs predominantly in female patients, presenting with a variety of ST-T segment changes and mildly elevated cardiac enzymes that mimic an acute coronary syndrome. The left ventricular dysfunction, typically showing a hyperkinetic basal region and an akinetic apical half of the ventricle, occurs in the absence of obstructed epicardial coronary arteries. The ventricular dysfunction usually resolves within weeks with a generally favorable prognosis. This phenomenon has similarities to that seen in patients with acute brain injury with regard to clinical presentation, pathology, and its reversible nature.Transient left ventricular dysfunction occurs in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease. In its broadest sense, this phenomenon may encompass a range of disorders including left ventricular dysfunction after central nervous system injury.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjmed.2005.08.022

    View details for Web of Science ID 000234912000005

    View details for PubMedID 16431176

  • Available transcatheter mitral valve repair techniques: CS method Transcathter Valve Repair Ako J, Hassan A, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2006: 285-294
  • Impact of asymmetric stent expansion on neointimal hyperplasia following sirolimus-eluting stent implantation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Ako, J., Honda, Y., Terashima, M., Morino, Y., Yock, P. G., Popma, J. J., Leon, M. B., Moses, J. W., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2005; 96 (10): 1404-1407

    Abstract

    To assess whether asymmetric stent expansion affects suppression of neointimal hyperplasia after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation, 64 patients in the SIRolImUS-coated Bx Velocity stent trial who underwent single 18-mm stent implantation and 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasonography at 8-month follow-up were enrolled. To assess the longitudinal stent asymmetric expansion, 2 cross sections with a maximal/minimal stent area were chosen in each patient. To assess for tomographic stent asymmetric expansion, stent eccentricity was determined by dividing the minimum stent diameter by the maximum stent diameter. At the 2 cross sections with a maximal/minimal stent area, a sirolimus-eluting stent reduced neointimal hyperplasia significantly with no interaction between the treatment and stent areas. A sirolimus-eluting stent also significantly reduced neointimal hyperplasia in the concentric and eccentric stent groups.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2005.07.044

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233509900012

    View details for PubMedID 16275187

  • Predictors of edge stenosis following sirolimus-eluting stent deployment (A quantitative intravascular ultrasound analysis from the SIRIUS trial) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Sakurai, R., Ako, J., Morino, Y., Sonoda, S., Kaneda, H., Terashima, M., Hassan, A. H., Leon, M. B., Moses, J. W., Popma, J. J., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2005; 96 (9): 1251-1253

    Abstract

    To study the interaction of the sirolimus-eluting stent and vessel margins, we analyzed the intravascular ultrasound parameters in 317 edges of 167 stents having 18 edge stenoses at 8 months of follow-up from the SIRIUS trial. Of the baseline parameters, a larger reference percentage of plaque area and a larger edge stent area/reference minimum lumen area were associated with edge stenosis in the sirolimus-eluting stent cohort compared with the incidence of edge stenosis in the bare metal stent cohort. Thus, full lesion coverage and matching the stented segment properly to the adjacent segment using intravascular ultrasound guidance may improve sirolimus-eluting stent implantation efficacy further.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2005.06.066

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233343500015

    View details for PubMedID 16253592

  • Impact of intravascular ultrasound lesion characteristics on neointimal hyperplasia following sirolimus-eluting stent implantation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Koizumi, T., Ako, J., Terashima, M., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Leon, M. B., Moses, J. W., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2005; 96 (9): 1237-1241

    Abstract

    The effect of lesion characteristics on neointimal hyperplasia after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation was examined in 45 patients who underwent successful preinterventional intravascular ultrasound. There were no differences in neointimal hyperplasia between the moderate/severe calcified lesion group (calcium arc >120 degrees ) and the non/mild calcified lesion group or between the positive vessel remodeling group (external elastic membrane area at the minimal lumen area site larger than that at the proximal reference site) and negative vessel remodeling group. No correlation between preinterventional plaque burden and neointimal hyperplasia was found. In patients who have coronary artery disease, sirolimus-eluting stents continue to demonstrate striking suppression of neointimal proliferation, irrespective of lesion characteristics previously associated with greater restenotic risk.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2005.06.063

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233343500012

    View details for PubMedID 16253589

  • Late incomplete stent apposition after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation - A serial intravascular ultrasound analysis JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Ako, J., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Hassan, A., Sonoda, S., Yock, P. G., Leon, M. B., Moses, J. W., Bonneau, H. N., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2005; 46 (6): 1002-1005

    Abstract

    We sought to identify the frequency of incomplete stent apposition (ISA) in sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and clarify its findings and clinical sequelae.Late-acquired ISA has been reported in bare-metal stents (BMS) and brachytherapy and recently in drug-eluting stents. However, the characteristics of late ISA in SES have not been clarified.From the SIRIUS trial, a randomized, multicenter study comparing SES and BMS, serial qualitative intravascular ultrasound (IVUS; at stent implantation and eight-month follow-up) was available in 141 patients (BMS: n = 61; SES: n = 80). The IVUS images were reviewed for the presence of ISA.Incomplete stent apposition at follow-up was observed in 19 patients (BMS: n = 6 [9.8%]; SES: n = 13 [16.3%]; p = NS). Among these, 12 had ISA after intervention and at follow-up (persistent ISA). Late-acquired ISA was seen in the remaining seven cases, all from the SES group (BMS: n = 0; SES: n = 7 [8.7%]; p < 0.05). In late-acquired ISA, there was an increase in external elastic membrane area (after intervention: 16.2 +/- 2.7 m2; follow-up: 18.9 +/- 3.6 mm2; p < 0.05). The location of stent-vessel wall separation was primarily at the stent edges in persistent ISA cases, whereas late-acquired ISA in SES occurred mostly in the mid portion of the stent. There were no negative clinical events reported for any ISA cases at 12-month clinical follow-up.Late ISA was observed in 8.7% of patients after SES implantation. There were no negative clinical events associated with this IVUS finding at 12-month clinical follow-up; however, careful long-term follow-up will be necessary.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2005.05.068

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231991600009

    View details for PubMedID 16168282

  • Effect of lumen narrowing within coronary stents on proximal and distal vessel segments following bare metal stent implantation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Kaneda, H., Ako, J., Kataoka, T., Miyazawa, A., Terashima, M., Ikeno, F., Sonoda, S., SHIMADA, Y., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2005; 96 (3): 376-378

    Abstract

    Adjacent reference vessel response to smaller lumens at stented segments was examined with 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound analysis. In 128 patients after bare metal stent implantation, minimal lumen area (MLA) within the stent and average lumen area at distal/proximal adjacent reference segments (5 mm) were obtained at baseline and follow-up. In the smaller in-stent MLA group (MLA <3 mm2), lumen area decreased significantly at the distal edge compared with the larger in-stent MLA group (MLA > or =3 mm2), although no significant difference was seen at the proximal edge. In-stent lumen patency may influence vascular responses at adjacent reference segments after bare metal stent implantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjcard.2005.03.079

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231057000011

    View details for PubMedID 16054461

  • Impact of different definitions on the interpretation of coronary remodeling determined by intravascular ultrasound CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Hibi, K., Ward, M. R., Honda, Y., Suzuki, T., Jeremias, A., Okura, H., Hassan, A. H., Maehara, A., Yeung, A. C., Pasterkamp, G., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yock, P. G. 2005; 65 (2): 233-239

    Abstract

    The objective of this study was to compare the categorizations and determinants related to remodeling by the three definitions commonly used. Several morphological and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies have demonstrated the fundamental importance of arterial remodeling in atherosclerosis. However, lack of consensus on how to define remodeling has led to conflicting analyses of factors that influence this process. Analysis of pre-interventional IVUS images of 514 lesions in native coronary arteries was performed. Arterial remodeling was defined as outward by definition 1, when [cross-sectional area (CSA) of the external elastic membrane (EEM) at the lesion site (EEM(lesion))]/[EEM CSA either at the proximal (EEM(prox ref)) or distal (EEM(distal ref)) reference site with the least amount of plaque] was > 1.05, intermediate when this ratio was between 0.95 and 1.05, and inward when < 0.95. Remodeling was defined as outward by definition 2 when EEM(lesion) > both EEM(prox ref) and EEM(distal ref), inward when EEM(lesion) < both EEM(prox ref) and EEM(distal ref), and intermediate when EEM(lesion) was intermediate between EEM(prox ref) and EEM(distal ref). By definition 3, vessel remodeling was defined as outward when EEM(lesion) > (EEM(prox ref) + EEM(distal ref))/2 and intermediate/inward when EEM(lesion) < or = (EEM(prox ref) + EEM(distal ref))/2. The frequency of outward remodeling was significantly higher by definitions 1 and 3 than by definition 2, whereas a higher frequency of inward remodeling was observed in definition 1, resulting in significantly different remodeling distributions between the three definitions (P < 0.0001). By multivariate logistic analysis, the only clinical determinants related to outward remodeling was younger age, and only by definition 3. IVUS determinants varied significantly between the three definitions. The only consistent determinants among the three definitions were smaller lumen CSA at the reference site and larger plaque + media CSA at the lesion site. This study demonstrates the significant impact of different remodeling definitions on the incidence and determinants of remodeling patterns. The marked variability in categorization of remodeling underscores the importance of developing a standard methodology.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.20366

    View details for Web of Science ID 000229557600015

    View details for PubMedID 15812811

  • Transient left ventricular apical ballooning ANNALS OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Ako, J., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. 2005; 142 (8): 678-678

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228410400019

    View details for PubMedID 15838081

  • Percutaneous coronary sinus repair of mitral regurgitation Interventional Cardiology: Current Best Practice Ikeno F, Honda Y, Bonneau HN, Hassan AHM, Fitzgerald PJ 2005: 69-86
  • Impending coronary perforation after cutting balloon angioplasty. Heart Ako, J., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2005; 91 (1)

    View details for PubMedID 15604315

  • Future directions of drug-eluting stent technology Coronary Intervention Honda Y 2005; 1 (1): 96-101
  • New treatment technologies for coronary artery disease: other techniques Practical Cardiology: Coronary Artery Disease II Hongo Y, Honda Y 2005; 5: 158-164
  • Impact of final Stent dimensions on long-term results following sirolimus-eluting stent implantation - Serial intravascular ultrasound analysis from the SIRIUS trial JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Sonoda, S., Morino, Y., Ako, J., Terashima, M., Hassan, A. H., Bonneau, H. N., Leon, M. B., Moses, J. W., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Kuntz, R. E., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2004; 43 (11): 1959-1963

    Abstract

    We assessed the predictive value of minimum stent area (MSA) for long-term patency of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) implantation compared to bare metal stents (BMS).Although MSA is a consistent predictor of in-stent restenosis, its predictive value in BMS is still limited because of biologic variability in the restenosis process.From the SIRolImUS (SIRIUS) trial, 122 cases (SES: 72; BMS: 50) with complete serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) (baseline and 8-month follow-up) were analyzed. Postprocedure MSA and follow-up minimum lumen area (MLA) were obtained. Based on previous physiologic studies, adequate stent patency at follow-up was defined as MLA >4 mm(2).In both groups, a significant positive correlation was observed between baseline MSA and follow-up MLA (SES: p < 0.0001, BMS: p < 0.0001). However, SES showed higher correlation than BMS (0.8 vs. 0.65) with a higher regression coefficient (0.92 vs. 0.59). The sensitivity and specificity curves identified different optimal thresholds of MSA to predict adequate follow-up MLA: 5 mm(2) for SES and 6.5 mm(2) for BMS. The positive predictive values with these cutoff points were 90% and 56%, respectively.In this SIRIUS IVUS substudy, SES reduced both biologic variability and restenosis, resulting in increased predictability of long-term stent patency with postprocedure MSA. In addition, SES had a considerably lower optimal MSA threshold compared to BMS.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j./jacc.2004.01.044

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221715800006

    View details for PubMedID 15172398

  • Validation of a thermographic guidewire for endoluminal mapping of atherosclerotic disease: An in vitro study CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Courtney, B. K., Nakamura, M., Tsugita, R., Lilly, R., Basisht, R., Grube, E., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2004; 62 (2): 221-229

    Abstract

    Temperature heterogeneity along the inner surface of an artery may be a surrogate marker of impending plaque rupture and has been associated with an increased likelihood of future coronary events. Initial studies using catheter-based thermographic devices have demonstrated that the changes in temperature are subtle, while the effects of coronary flow on measured temperature have not yet been examined. A novel guidewire-based system (ThermoCoil, Imetrx) designed to measure surface temperature in coronary arteries was used to study the effects of heat source intensity and flow on measured temperature. An in vitro model of a focal, eccentric, heat-generating lesion demonstrated that a guidewire-based system can detect changes in surface temperature with a precision of less than 0.08 degrees C. In this model, temperature measurements increased linearly with source temperature and decreased with increases in flow by an exponent of -0.33 (P < 0.001 for both). Flow rates and heat source properties can significantly influence the measurement and interpretation of thermographic data. The incorporation of 2D thermographic images may contribute further to the characterization of metabolically active plaques likely to cause acute coronary syndromes.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.10750

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221856000016

    View details for PubMedID 15170716

  • Six- and twelve-month results from first human experience using everolimus-eluting stents with bioabsorbable polymer CIRCULATION Grube, E., Sonoda, S., Ikeno, F., Honda, Y., Kar, S., Chan, C., Gerckens, U., Lansky, A. J., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2004; 109 (18): 2168-2171

    Abstract

    Everolimus, an active immunosuppressive and antiproliferative agent of the same family as sirolimus (rapamycin), has demonstrated significant reduction of neointimal proliferation in animal studies. The First Use To Underscore restenosis Reduction with Everolimus (FUTURE) I trial was the first in-human experience to evaluate the safety and efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents (EES), coated with a bioabsorbable polymer, compared with bare metal stents (BMS).FUTURE I was a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial that enrolled 42 patients with de novo coronary lesions (EES 27, BMS 15). Patient and lesion characteristics were comparable between the groups. Major adverse cardiac event rates were low at 30 days and 6 months, without any early or late stent thrombosis for either group (P=NS). Between 6 and 12 months, there were no additional reports of major adverse cardiac events. The 6-month angiographic in-stent restenosis rate was 0% versus 9.1% (1 patient) (P=NS), with an associated late loss of 0.11 mm versus 0.85 mm (P<0.001), and the in-segment restenosis rate was 4% (1 patient) and 9.1% (1 patient) (P=NS) for EES and BMS, respectively. Intravascular ultrasound analysis revealed a significant reduction of percent neointimal volume in EES compared with BMS (2.9+/-1.9 mm3/mm versus 22.4+/-9.4 mm3/mm, P<0.001). There was no late stent malapposition in either group. The safety and efficacy of the EES appeared to be sustained at 12 months.In this initial clinical experience, EES with bioabsorbable polymer demonstrated a safe and efficacious method to reduce in-stent neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/01.CIR.0000128850.84227.FD

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221322600003

    View details for PubMedID 15123533

  • Conditions associated with ST-segment elevation NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Ako, J., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2004; 350 (11): 1152-1153

    View details for Web of Science ID 000220110100023

    View details for PubMedID 15014192

  • Paclitaxel-eluting stent Drug-Eluting Stent Nakamura M, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 74-82
  • Left main coronary disease: an IVUS perspective Coronary Intervention Shimada Y, Honda Y 2004; 3 (2): 16-22
  • Other drug-eluting stents Drug-Eluting Stent Kaneda H, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 105-110
  • Drug-eluting stent: basic components Drug-Eluting Stent Ako J, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 40-50
  • Lessons from failed drug-eluting stents Drug-Eluting Stent Sonoda S, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 111-115
  • Dexamethasone-eluting stent (Dexamet?) Drug-Eluting Stent Sakurai R, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 83-88
  • Sirolimus-eluting stent (CYPHER?) Drug-Eluting Stent Morino Y, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 63-73
  • Estradiol-eluting stent Drug-Eluting Stent Sakurai R, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 101-104
  • ABT-578-eluting stent Drug-Eluting Stent Hongo Y, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 98-100
  • IVUS observations of drug-eluting stents Drug-Eluting Stent Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 128-138
  • Paclitaxel-eluting stent Jpn J Cardiovasc Ther Morino Y, Nakamura M, Kataoka T, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004; 4 (2): 148-153
  • Drug-eluting stent for the treatment of in-stent restenosis Drug-Eluting Stent Kataoka T, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2004: 116-122
  • Thrombectomy and distal protection: protection of coronary microcirculation and myocardium Coronary Intervention Honda Y 2004: 199-206
  • Late incomplete stent apposition and focal vessel expansion after bare metal stenting AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Nakamura, M., Kataoka, T., Honda, Y., Bonneau, H. N., Hibi, K., Kitamura, K., Tamai, H., Aizawa, T., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2003; 92 (10): 1217-1219

    Abstract

    Late incomplete stent apposition was observed in 2.4% of the 412 stented segments studied by serial intravascular ultrasound analyses. Most of these phenomena and all late vessel expansions with incomplete stent apposition developed in vessels in which lesions were treated by atherectomy before stenting, suggesting a potential association between mechanical injury from debulking and these phenomena.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186638600019

    View details for PubMedID 14609603

  • Late incomplete apposition with excessive remodeling of the stented coronary artery following intravascular brachytherapy AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Okura, H., Lee, D. P., Lo, S., Yeung, A. C., Honda, Y., Waksman, R., Kaluza, G. L., Ali, N. M., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Raizner, A. E., Mintz, G. S., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2003; 92 (5): 587-590

    Abstract

    Intravascular brachytherapy may cause "exaggerated" vessel remodeling with late incomplete apposition in segments that have little disease, which are exposed to higher radiation doses. The long-term clinical impact of this finding is unclear.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0002-9149(03)00728-8

    View details for Web of Science ID 000185060700017

    View details for PubMedID 12943881

  • Stent thrombosis - An issue revisited in a changing world CIRCULATION Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2003; 108 (1): 2-5
  • Coronary vasodilation by noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound - An in vivo canine study JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Miyamoto, T., Neuman, Y., Luo, H., Jeon, D. S., Kobal, S., Ikeno, F., Horzewski, M., Honda, Y., Mirocha, J. M., Iwami, T., Echt, D., Fishbein, M. C., Siegel, R. J. 2003; 41 (9): 1623-1627

    Abstract

    We evaluated the coronary vasodilatory effects of transcutaneous low-frequency (27-kHz) ultrasound (USD).Ultrasound has been shown to affect vascular function.Ultrasound energy was administered transcutaneously to 12 dogs. Coronary arterial dimensions were assessed using intravascular coronary ultrasound (IVUS) and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA).The IVUS mid-left anterior descending (LAD) luminal area was 6.77 +/- 1.27 mm(2) at baseline. After 30 s of ultrasound, this area increased by 9% (7.40 +/- 1.44 mm(2), p < 0.05), after 3 min by 19% (8.05 +/- 1.72 mm(2), p < 0.05) and after 5 min increased by 21% (8.16 +/- 1.29 mm(2), p < 0.05). The mean coronary diameter (2.69 +/- 0.33 mm) at baseline (QCA of three segments of LAD and three segments of left circumflex coronary artery) increased by 19.3% (3.21 +/- 0.28 mm) after 5 min of USD exposure. After a 90-min observation period there was a return to baseline values (p = NS). Intracoronary nitroglycerin (NTG) administered to five dogs revealed a similar magnitude of vasodilation as USD.Noninvasive, transthoracic low-frequency USD energy results in coronary artery vasodilation within seconds of exposure. The vasodilation is reversible and is similar in magnitude to that induced by NTG. Further evaluation is needed to assess its potential applications in humans.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0735-1097(03)00412-1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000182631800030

    View details for PubMedID 12742306

  • Noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound augments thrombolysis in the left circumflex coronary artery - an in vivo canine study THROMBOSIS RESEARCH Jeon, D. S., Luo, H., Fishbein, M. C., Miyamoto, T., Horzewski, M., Iwami, T., Mirocha, J. M., Ikeno, F., Honda, Y., Siegel, R. J. 2003; 110 (2-3): 149-158

    Abstract

    Ultrasound has the potential to augment chemical thrombolysis.Thrombotic occlusions in the left circumflex artery (LCx) were induced in 27 dogs. Sixty minutes later, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was given intravenously over 90 min. Thrombotic occlusions (n = 20) were treated with concomitant transcutaneous low frequency (27 kHz), continuous wave (CW) (n = 10) or pulsed wave (PW) (n = 10) ultrasound. Tissue-type plasminogen activator plus ultrasound (n = 20) vs. tissue-type plasminogen activator alone (n=7) resulted in more frequent Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 3 flow (90% vs. 43%, P = 0.024) and less reocclusion (11% vs. 67%, P = 0.080). At 60 min, median TIMI grade flow for tissue-type plasminogen activator alone was 2 (mean: 1.43 +/- 1.40) compared to 3 (mean: 2.70 +/- 0.95) for tissue-type plasminogen activator plus continuous as well as pulsed wave ultrasound (P = 0.035). Continuous wave and pulsed wave ultrasound were equally effective in augmenting thrombolysis. Histologically, no ultrasound-mediated injury to the myocardium or coronary arteries occurred.Both transcutaneous low frequency continuous wave ultrasound and pulsed wave ultrasound enhance tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated thrombolysis of the posterior circulation with higher TIMI 3 flow rates and less reocclusion than with tissue-type plasminogen activator alone. In addition, at the energy levels used, low frequency ultrasound appears safe.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0049-3848(03)00335-9

    View details for Web of Science ID 000184729400011

    View details for PubMedID 12893030

  • Taxol-based eluting stents from theory to human validation: clinical and intravascular ultrasound observations. journal of invasive cardiology Sonoda, S., Honda, Y., Kataoka, T., Bonneau, H. N., Sudhir, K., Yock, P. G., Mintz, G. S., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2003; 15 (3): 109-114

    Abstract

    Treatment with antiproliferative drugs via coated stents appears to be a promising approach to both mechanically remodel target lesions and biologically reduce neointimal hyperplasia. Drug-eluting stents can maximize local drug effects and minimize the potential for systemic toxic effects. The purpose of this review is to describe the effects of a lipophilic microtubular inhibitor, paclitaxel, a strong antiproliferative agent under clinical investigation, and to define the vascular response to taxol-based eluting stents by intravascular ultrasound.

    View details for PubMedID 12612382

  • Relationship between neointimal regrowth and mechanism of acute lumen gain during the treatment of in-stent restenosis with or without supplementary intravascular radiation CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Morino, Y., Limpijankit, T., Honda, Y., Somrantin, M., Waksman, R., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Mintz, G. S., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2003; 58 (2): 162-167

    Abstract

    We investigated whether neointimal regrowth is related to the mechanism of acute lumen gain during the treatment of in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesions both with and without adjunct intravascular brachytherapy. From the WRIST (Washington Radiation for In-Stent Restenosis Trial) cohort, 54 ISR patients ((192)Ir, 29; placebo, 25) were treated with nonrepeat stenting percutaneous interventions (excimer laser, rotational atherectomy, and/or balloon angioplasty) prior to (192)Ir or placebo therapy. Using Simpson's method, serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analyses (pre- and posttreatment and 6-month follow-up) were analyzed to obtain stent, lumen, and intimal hyperplasia (IH) volumes that were then adjusted for stent length to create stent, lumen, and IH volume indexes. In the placebo group, the acute reduction of neointima (1.6 +/- 1.4 mm(3)/mm) was counteracted by intimal regrowth (2.1 +/- 1.7 mm(3)/mm). The amount of intimal regrowth correlated directly with the intimal reduction due to the intervention (r = 0.76; P < 0.001), but not with the amount of additional stent expansion. In the (192)Ir-treated group, intimal regrowth was significantly less than in the placebo group (-0.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 2.1 +/- 1.7 mm(3)/mm; P < 0.001) despite a similar initial intimal reduction (1.3 +/- 0.9 vs. 1.6 +/- 1.4 mm(3)/mm; P = NS). No correlation was found between intimal reduction at the time of the procedure and intimal regrowth in the (192)Ir group. In this study, neointimal regrowth following treatment of ISR lesions correlates directly with the extent of acute intimal volume reduction, but not with the extent of additional stent expansion. This relation is not seen in ISR segments treated with radiation, where intimal regrowth is substantially inhibited.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.10405

    View details for Web of Science ID 000182814600005

    View details for PubMedID 12552537

  • Impact of deep vessel wall injury on acute response and remodeling of coronary artery segments after cutting balloon angioplasty AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Nakamura, M., Yock, P. G., Kataoka, T., Bonneau, H. N., Suzuki, T., Yamaguchi, T., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2003; 91 (1): 6-11

    Abstract

    Deep vessel wall injury is believed to affect vessel dimension following coronary intervention. The cutting balloon is designed to treat coronary artery stenoses with dilatation and surgical incisions, thereby reducing excess vessel injury. This study examines the effect of deep vessel wall injury on acute and late coronary arterial response after cutting balloon angioplasty. Serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analyses were performed in 63 lesions treated with cutting balloon angioplasty alone. Before intervention, the longitudinal range of the lesion segment that included the smallest lumen area (LA) was determined as LA <4 mm(2) and/or LA stenosis >60%. The exact corresponding site at postintervention and follow-up was aligned using peri- and intravascular landmarks. Average vessel area (VA), plaque area (PA), and LA were measured. Lesion segments were categorized as with or without deep vessel wall injury, which was defined as the presence of plaque/vessel wall fracture extending to the sonolucent (medial) layer. Before intervention, the lesion vessel size of deep injury group was smaller than that of the nondeep injury group (p <0.05 for average VA and PA), whereas average lesion LA, lesion length, and reference vessel size did not differ. Immediately after cutting balloon angioplasty, the deep injury group showed a significant increase in VA (p <0.0001) and a lesser decrease in PA (p <0.01) compared with the nondeep injury group. During follow-up, the increase of VA tended to be greater in the deep injury group than in the nondeep injury group (p = 0.06), whereas the change of PA did not differ. Consequently, LA decrease was less in the deep injury group than in the nondeep injury group (p <0.05). From these results, it is suggested that deep vessel wall injury tends to occur in lesions with relatively small size and such lesions show favorable vessel response after cutting balloon angioplasty.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000180201000002

    View details for PubMedID 12505563

  • What do cardiologists want from vascular ultrasound? Vascular Ultrasound Kaneda H, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2003: 3-27
  • IVUS guided stenting - optimizing outcomes Coronary Intervention Sakurai R, Honda Y, Bonneau HN, Fitzgerald PJ 2003; 2 (2): 26-30
  • New technologies for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction: ongoing clinical trials in the United States and Europe Cardioangiology Honda Y 2003; 54: 70-79
  • Percutaneous intervention by the coronary venous route Heart View Honda Y, Hayase M 2003; 7 (2): 58-64
  • Efficacy and feasibility of helixcision for debulking neointimal hyperplasia for in-stent restenosis CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Nakamura, M., Fitzgerald, P. J., Ikeno, F., Honda, Y., Sousa, J. E., Abizaid, A., de Brito, F. S., Tofte, A., Grube, E., Patterson, G. R., Yock, P. G., Yeung, A. C., Carter, A. J. 2002; 57 (4): 460-466

    Abstract

    The Helixcision system is a novel 6 Fr-compatible catheter designed to debulk tissue for in-stent restenosis lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of this new system for removing neointimal hyperplasia. A total of 32 in-stent restenosis lesions in 32 patients were treated with helixcision followed by balloon angioplasty. Debulking efficacy was assessed with serial baseline intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in a subset of 18 lesions. To investigate longitudinal efficacy, 3D analysis was also performed in 12 lesions with automated pullback to calculate average cross-sectional areas across the stent. Prior to procedure, the angiographic reference diameter was 2.60 +/- 0.46 mm. Immediately after procedure, minimum lumen diameter improved from 0.84 +/- 0.33 to 2.19 +/- 0.41 mm (P < 0.0001). IVUS showed a significant reduction of intimal area (IA) after helixcision (from 4.95 +/- 2.04 to 2.88 +/- 1.48 mm(2); P < 0.001). Adjunctive balloon angioplasty further improved lumen area (LA) mainly by stent expansion rather than IA reduction at the site of minimum lumen area. The degrees of IA reduction and LA improvement were closely similar in volumetric analysis. Thirty-day and 6-month clinical follow-up were available in 97% (n = 31) and 72% (n = 23) of the enrolled patients, respectively. At 30-day follow-up, no major adverse cardiac event was reported except for periprocedural CK elevation in two patients (6%). Target legion revascularization within 6 months was performed in six patients (26%). Preliminary results of helixcision indicate that this system is safe and feasible for the treatment of in-stent restenosis. The concordant results between 2D and 3D IVUS analyses suggest that this unique technology can achieve uniform longitudinal debulking throughout the stent. The long-term outcomes appeared to be favorable, considering the relatively diffuse lesion morphology.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ccd.10352

    View details for Web of Science ID 000182814400006

    View details for PubMedID 12455079

  • Quantitative and spatial relation of baseline atherosclerotic plaque burden and subsequent in-stent neointimal proliferation as determined by intravascular ultrasound AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Hibi, K., Suzuki, T., Honda, Y., Hayase, M., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Yeung, A. C., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2002; 90 (10): 1164-?

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179262600027

    View details for PubMedID 12423727

  • Delivered dose and vascular response after beta-radiation for in-stent restenosis - Retrospective dosimetry and volumetric intravascular ultrasound analysis CIRCULATION Morino, Y., Kaneda, H., Fox, T., Takagi, A., Hassan, A. H., Bonan, R., Crocker, I., Lansky, A. J., Laskey, W. K., Suntharalingam, M., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2002; 106 (18): 2334-2339

    Abstract

    Observations from previous intracoronary radiation therapy trials noted a considerable discrepancy between the prescribed radiation dose and the dose actually delivered. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of actual delivered dose on vascular changes and to test the appropriateness of the current dose prescription.Serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) analysis was performed in 30 in-stent restenosis cases treated with a 40-mm (90)Sr/Y source train. The fixed dose was prescribed at 2 mm from the centerline of the source train (18.4 Gy at 2 mm for reference diameter < or =3.35 mm and 23 Gy for diameter > or =3.36 mm). Only stent segments with full radiation coverage and device injury were enrolled and divided into 2-mm-long subsegments (n=202). D(S90)EEM (the minimum dose absorbed by 90% of the external elastic membrane surface) was calculated as the delivered dose corresponding to each segment, assuming that the radiation catheter occupied the same position in the vessel as the IVUS catheter. Mean D(S90)EEM of 23.5+/-5.82 Gy (range 12.3 to 41.7 Gy) was delivered to these subsegments. Overall, intimal hyperplasia volume remained constant from postintervention to follow-up (2.23+/-1.10 to 2.32+/-1.09 mm3/m; P=NS). Regression analysis revealed there was no correlation between delivered dose intensity and changes in intimal hyperplasia volume. No particular dose-dependent complications were appreciated in this delivered dose range.The current dose-prescription protocol of (90)Sr/Y radiation to native in-stent restenosis lesions may provide substantial inhibition of neointimal reproliferation regardless of the actual delivered dose intensity.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/01.CIR.0000036367.17043.03

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179046600017

    View details for PubMedID 12403663

  • 7-hexanoyltaxol-eluting stent for prevention of neointimal growth - An intravascular ultrasound analysis from the study to COmpare REstenosis rate between QueST and QuaDS-QP2 (SCORE) CIRCULATION Kataoka, T., Grube, E., Honda, Y., Morino, Y., Hur, S. H., Bonneau, H. N., Colombo, A., Di Mario, C., Guagliumi, G., Hauptmann, K. E., Pitney, M. R., Lansky, A. J., Stertzer, S. H., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2002; 106 (14): 1788-1793

    Abstract

    Inhibition of neointimal tissue growth has been demonstrated in preliminary human feasibility studies with a stent-based polymer sleeve delivering 7-hexanoyltaxol. The Study to COmpare REstenosis rate between QueST and QuaDS-QP2 (SCORE) trial is a human, randomized, multicenter trial comparing 7-hexanoyltaxol (QP2)-eluting stents (qDES) with bare metal stents (BMS) in the treatment of de novo coronary lesions. The purpose of this substudy was to evaluate the acute expansion property and long-term neointimal responses of qDES compared with BMS as assessed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).A total of 122 (qDES 66, BMS 56) patients were enrolled into the IVUS substudy. All IVUS images (immediately after the procedure and at 6-month follow-up) were analyzed at an independent core laboratory in a blind manner. At baseline, qDES achieved stent expansion similar to BMS. At follow-up, qDES showed reduced neointimal growth by 70% at the tightest cross section and by 68% over the stented segment (P<0.0001 for both), resulting in a significantly larger lumen in qDES than in BMS. Unlike intracoronary brachytherapy, there was no evidence of negative edge effects, unhealed dissections, or late stent-vessel wall malapposition over the stented and adjacent references segments in either group.Detailed IVUS analysis revealed that qDES had comparable acute mechanical and superior long-term biological effects to BMS. Although the long-term benefits and limitations of this technology require further investigation, the reduction in neointimal thickenings demonstrated that local delivery of 7-hexanoyltaxol through polymer sleeves augments conventional mechanical treatment of atherosclerotic disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000178385700012

    View details for PubMedID 12356631

  • New catheter-based technology for the treatment of restenosis. Journal of interventional cardiology Kataoka, T., Honda, Y., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2002; 15 (5): 371-379

    Abstract

    Catheter-based vascular interventions have been in development worldwide for several decades, leading to remarkable progress in device technology. Mechanical interventional devices, such as angioplasty balloons, atherectomy devices, and stents, were invented and have contributed greatly to the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular stenosis. However, mechanical approaches do not effectively prevent subsequent intimal growth. Recently, several biological approaches, including radiation therapy and drug-eluting stents, have shown striking inhibition of intimal growth. These significant results are likely to change the treatment strategy in the field of interventional cardiology. Furthermore, additional catheter-based technologies for vascular interventions are presently being evaluated. These latest technologies designed to prevent intimal proliferation include intravascular sonotherapy, cryotherapy, photoangioplasty, and soft X ray. To date, intravascular sonotherapy has proven its efficacy in animal studies and safety in human studies. Cryotherapy, the application of cold thermal energy during angioplasty, enhances the acute effects of conventional dilation while decreasing the likelihood of restenosis. Photoangioplasty has a unique property based on its selective mechanism of action to treat atheromatous plaque. Soft X ray systems provide convenient device handling and well-controlled radiation dose. Some of these technologies may play an important role in vascular interventions in the near future.

    View details for PubMedID 12440180

  • Images in cardiovascular medicine. "Arteries within the artery" after Kawasaki disease: a lotus root appearance by intravascular ultrasound. Circulation Terashima, M., Awano, K., Honda, Y., Yoshino, N., Mori, T., Fujita, H., Ohashi, Y., Seguchi, O., Kobayashi, K., Yamagishi, M., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yock, P. G., Maeda, K. 2002; 106 (7): 887-?

    View details for PubMedID 12176965

  • "Arteries within the artery" after Kawasaki disease - A lotus root appearance by intravascular ultrasound CIRCULATION Terashima, M., Awano, K., Honda, Y., Yoshino, N., Mori, T., Fujita, H., Ohashi, Y., Seguchi, O., Kobayashi, K., Yamagishi, M., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yock, P. G., Maeda, K. 2002; 106 (7): 887-887
  • Late vascular response to repeat stenting for in-stent restenosis with and without radiation - An intravascular ultrasound volumetric analysis CIRCULATION Morino, Y., Limpijankit, T., Honda, Y., Lansky, A. J., Waksman, R., Bonneau, H. N., Yock, P. G., Mintz, G. S., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2002; 105 (21): 2465-2468

    Abstract

    Re-stenting of in-stent restenosis (ISR) improves acute angiographic results. Methods and Results- Volumetric intravascular ultrasound analysis was performed in 70 ISR lesions that received either placebo (n=36) or (192)Ir radiation (n=34). ISR lesions treated by re-stenting were divided into 3 groups: old stent not re-stented (A), old/new stent overlap (B), and new stent only (C). ISR lesions treated without re-stenting were categorized as D. In placebo patients, postintervention lumen volume index (LVI) was significantly greater in re-stented segments B and C than in non-re-stented segment A (P<0.05).At follow-up, however, LVI was similar in all 4 segments secondary to the increased intimal hyperplasia (IH) reaccumulation within the re-stented segments. In patients treated with (192)Ir radiation, LVI was maintained from baseline to follow-up only in non-re-stented segments A and D. Conversely, there was a significant decrease in LVI in re-stented segments B and C (P<0.05). Qualitatively, 79% of patients in the irradiated group had stent struts with undetectable neointimal versus only 27% in the placebo group (P<0.001). Coefficient of variation of IH reaccumulation was greater in re-stented segments of (192)Ir patients (B=57.3% and C=58.9%) than in re-stented segments in placebo patients (B=27.3% and C 26.8%) and non-re-stented segments in irradiated patients.Additional lumen gain from re-stenting ISR lesions is counteracted by exaggerated neointimal proliferation in placebo patients. Maximum effectiveness and safety of radiation can be achieved for ISR lesions when treated without re-stenting. Thus, regardless of supplementary intravascular brachytherapy, repeat stenting strategies provided little long-term advantage.

    View details for DOI 10.1161/01.CIR.0000018949.39445.40

    View details for Web of Science ID 000175927500011

    View details for PubMedID 12034650

  • Coronary intravascular ultrasonography PanVascular Medicine: Integrated Clinical Management Staehr P, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ, Yock PG 2002: 667-678
  • Intravascular ultrasound and quantitative coronary angiography CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Takahashi, T., Honda, Y., Russo, R. J., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2002; 55 (1): 118-128

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172956000024

    View details for PubMedID 11793508

  • Prevention of restenosis: sonotheraphy, photoangioplasty and cryotherapy Cardiology New Trends: New Trends in Coronary Intervention Morino Y, Kataoka T, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2002: 138-147
  • Intravascular ultrasound Textbook of Interventional Cardiology Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ, Yock PG 2002: 893-917
  • Predictors and outcomes of stent thrombosis - An intravascular ultrasound registry EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL Uren, N. G., Schwarzacher, S. P., Metz, J. A., Lee, D. R., Honda, Y., Yeung, A. C., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yock, P. G. 2002; 23 (2): 124-132

    Abstract

    To investigate whether intravascular ultrasound provides additional information regarding the prediction of stent thrombosis, a retrospective multicentre registry was designed to enrol patients with stent thrombosis following stent deployment under ultrasound guidance.A total of 53 patients were enrolled (mean age 61+/-9 years) with stable angina (43%), unstable angina (36%), and post-infarct angina (21%) who underwent intracoronary stenting. The majority had balloon angioplasty alone prior to stenting (94%) with 6% also undergoing rotational atherectomy. The indication for stenting was elective (53%), suboptimal result (32%) and bailout (15%). There were 1.6+/-0.8 stents/artery with 87% undergoing high-pressure dilatation (> or =14 atmospheres). The minimum stent area was 7.7+/-2.8 mm(2)with a mean stent expansion of 81.5+/-21.9%. Overall, 94% of cases demonstrated one abnormal ultrasound finding (stent under-expansion, malapposition, inflow/outflow disease, dissection, or thrombus). Angiography demonstrated an abnormality in only 32% of cases (chi-square=30.0, P<0.001). Stent thrombosis occurred at 132+/-125 h after deployment. Myocardial infarction occurred in 67% and there was an overall mortality of 15%.On comparison with angiography, the vast majority of stents associated with subsequent thrombosis have at least one abnormal feature by intravascular ultrasound at the time of stent deployment.

    View details for DOI 10.1053/euhj.2001.2707

    View details for Web of Science ID 000173390100009

    View details for PubMedID 11785994

  • Combining a drug-eluting stent and platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibition in a patient with acute coronary syndrome J Invasive Cardiol Kaneda H, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2002; 4 (16)
  • New technology for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction: how to protect coronary microcirculation and myocardium Coronary Intervention Honda Y 2002; 1 (4): 99-105
  • Intravascular ultrasound observations for stented and non-stented procedures Vascular Brachytherapy Hur SH, Honda Y, Bonneau HN, Yock PG, Fitzgerald PJ 2002: 581-603
  • New technology for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction: how to protect coronary microcirculation and myocardium Coronary Intervention Honda Y 2002; 1 (4): 99-105
  • Efficacy of postdeployment balloon dilatation for current generation stents as assessed by intravascular ultrasound AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Hur, S. H., Kitamura, K., Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Jones, M., Korr, K. S., Reen, B., Cooper, C. J., Niess, G. S., Christie, L., Corey, W., Messenger, J., Yock, P. G., Cummins, F., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 88 (10): 1114-1119

    Abstract

    Adjunctive balloon dilatation strategy has been shown to improve optimal stent deployment. As improvements in current stent designs evolve, less adjunctive balloon dilatation may be needed. However, few data currently exist to support this practice. We evaluated 88 native coronary lesions treated with single stent implantation (Nir, Tristar or S670). Serial intravascular ultrasound was performed after successful stent deployment and again after adjunctive balloon dilatation. To investigate further the precise expansion characteristics of the stents, serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound analyses were performed in 40 patients with automated pullback. After adjunctive balloon dilatation, minimal stent area increased significantly, from 6.4 +/- 2.1 to 7.4 +/- 2.2 mm(2) (p <0.001). Volumetric analysis showed a corresponding increase in stent volume index (6.6 +/- 1.8 to 7.5 +/- 2.0 mm(3)/mm, p <0.001). In the analysis of cross sections at 0.5-mm axial intervals, the percentage of cross sections, where stent area was > or =80% of the average reference lumen area, increased from 51% to 78% (p <0.001). Similarly, the percentage of cross sections, where stent area was > or =90% of the average reference lumen area, increased from 29% to 56% (p <0.001) with postdilatation. Postdeployment high- pressure balloon dilatation improved minimal stent area and volumetric expansion throughout the stented segment.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172412300006

    View details for PubMedID 11703954

  • The renaissance of directional coronary atherectomy: a second look from the inside. journal of invasive cardiology Honda, Y., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 13 (11): 748-751

    View details for PubMedID 11689719

  • An optimal diagnostic threshold for minimal stent area to predict target lesion revascularization following stent implantation in native coronary lesions AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Morino, Y., Honda, Y., Okura, H., Oshima, A., Hayase, M., Bonneau, H. N., Kuntz, R. E., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 88 (3): 301-?

    View details for Web of Science ID 000170090500020

    View details for PubMedID 11472713

  • Novel drug-delivery stent - Intravascular ultrasound observations from the first human experience with the QP2-eluting polymer stent system CIRCULATION Honda, Y., Grube, E., de la Fuente, L. M., Yock, P. G., Stertzer, S. H., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 104 (4): 380-383

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to use serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to evaluate the long-term effect of stent-based 7-hexanoyltaxol (QP2, a taxane analogue) delivery on neointimal tissue growth within the stent and on vessel dimensions at the adjacent reference segments.Serial IVUS analyses (immediately after intervention and at follow-up at 8.3 months) were performed in 15 native coronary lesions treated with the QuaDS-QP2 stent. IVUS measurements were performed at 8 cross-sections in each target segment (4 cross-sections within the stent and 2 cross-sections in each reference segment). At baseline, no significant plaque protrusion or thrombus was detected in the target segment. Mild incomplete stent apposition and edge dissection were observed in one and two cases, respectively. Percent expansion of the stent (minimum stent area/average reference lumen area) was 96.0+/-21.7%. At follow-up, mean neointimal area within the stent was 1.2+/-1.3 mm(2), and mean cross-sectional narrowing (neointimal area/stent area) was 13.6+/-14.9%. At the vessel segments immediately adjacent to the stent, a significant increase in plaque area (1.9+/-2.6 mm(2), P=0.001) was observed, but vessel area remained unchanged. However, no patients showed clinically significant in-stent or edge restenosis (diameter stenosis >/=50%) during the follow-up period.The first human experience with the new drug-delivery stent showed a minimal amount of neointimal proliferation in the stented segment. Late lumen loss at the reference sites adjacent to the stent was acceptable and predominantly due to plaque proliferation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000170116200003

    View details for PubMedID 11468196

  • Impact of peri-stent remodeling on restenosis - A volumetric intravascular ultrasound study CIRCULATION Nakamura, M., Yock, P. G., Bonneau, H. N., Kitamura, K., Aizawa, T., Tamai, H., Fitzgerald, P. J., Honda, Y. 2001; 103 (17): 2130-2132

    Abstract

    Vessel remodeling is an important mechanism of late lumen loss after nonstent coronary interventions. However, its impact on in-stent restenosis has not been systematically investigated.Serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound analyses (poststent and follow-up) were performed in 55 lesions treated with a balloon-expandable stent (ACS MultiLink) using standard stent deployment techniques. The vessel volume (VV), lumen volume (LV), and volume bordered by the stent (SV) were measured using Simpson's method. The volume of plaque and neointima outside the stent (peri-stent volume, PSV) and volume of neointima within the stent (intrastent volume) were also measured. The change of each parameter during the follow-up period (follow-up minus poststent) was calculated and then divided by SV to normalize these values (designated as percent change [%]). As expected, %PSV directly correlated with %VV (P<0.0001, r=0.935), with no significant SV. A highly significant inverse correlation was seen between %PSV and the percent change of intrastent volume (P<0.0001, r=0.517). Consequently, %LV significantly correlated with peri-stent remodeling, as measured by %VV (P<0.0001, r=0.602).Positive remodeling of the vessel exterior to a coronary stent occurs to a variable degree after stent implantation. There is a distinct trade-off between positive remodeling and in-stent hyperplasia: in segments in which the degree of peri-stent remodeling is less, intrastent neointimal proliferation is greater and accompanied by more significant late lumen loss.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168583700002

    View details for PubMedID 11331251

  • Long-term vessel response to a self-expanding coronary stent: A serial volumetric intravascular ultrasound analysis from the ASSURE trial JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Kobayashi, Y., Honda, Y., Christie, L. G., Teirstein, P. S., Bailey, S. R., Brown, C. L., Matthews, R. V., De Franco, A. C., Schwartz, R. S., Goldberg, S., Popma, J. J., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 37 (5): 1329-1334

    Abstract

    We sought to investigate the in vivo mechanical properties of a new self-expanding coronary stent (RADIUS) and, particularly, the subsequent vessel response over time.Preclinical studies have suggested that self-expanding stents may produce less vessel wall injury at initial deployment, leading to larger follow-up lumens than with balloon-expandable stents. However, the influence of the chronic stimulus from self-expanding stents on the vessel wall remains unknown.Sixty-two patients were randomly assigned to either the RADIUS self-expanding stent group (n = 32) or the Palmaz-Schatz balloon-expandable stent group (n = 30). Intravascular ultrasound was performed after stent deployment and at six-month follow-up.At follow-up, the RADIUS stents had increased 23.6% in overall volume, while the Palmaz-Schatz stents had remained unchanged. Due to the greater mean neointimal area (3.0 +/- 1.7 mm2 vs. 1.9 +/- 1.2 mm2, p = 0.02) in the RADIUS group, no significant difference in net late lumen loss was observed between the two groups. On the other hand, analysis at the peristent margins demonstrated that mean late loss was significantly smaller in the RADIUS group than it was in the Palmaz-Schatz group (0.1 +/- 2.1 mm2 vs. 1.9 +/- 2.4 mm2, p = 0.02).Serial volumetric IVUS revealed that the RADIUS stents continued to enlarge during the follow-up period. In this stent implantation protocol, this expansion was accompanied by a greater amount of neointima than the Palmaz-Schatz stents, resulting in similar late lumen loss in both configurations. In the peristent margins, however, late lumen loss was minimized with the RADIUS stents.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000167901700027

    View details for PubMedID 11300443

  • Future direction of intravascular ultrasound Clinical Echocardiography Honda Y, Kobayashi Y 2001: 267-275
  • Principles of intravascular ultrasound Clinical Echocardiography Honda Y, Kobayashi Y 2001: 252-259
  • The effect of intracoronary gamma-radiation therapy for in-stent restenosis: an intravascular ultrasound study. Cardiovascular radiation medicine Limpijankit, T., Honda, Y., Mehran, R., Waksman, R., Lansky, A. J., Mintz, G. S., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2001; 2 (1): 54

    View details for PubMedID 11068265

  • The role of intravascular ultrasound in clinical trials Clinical Echocardiography Honda Y 2001: 265-267
  • Stanford University Journal of Clinical Echocardiography Honda Y 2001
  • The role of IVUS in the prevention and treatment of restenosis Restenosis: A Guide to Therapy Shimodozono S, Honda Y, Bonneau HN, Fitzgerald PJ 2001: 77-95
  • Vascular brachytherapy: from theory to practice Coronary Angioplasty and Intravascular Ultrasound for Brachytherapy Morino Y, Takagi A, Honda Y, Fitzgerald PJ 2001: 121-141
  • Longitudinal plaque redistribution during stent expansion AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Maehara, A., Takagi, A., Okura, H., Hassan, A. H., Bonneau, H. N., Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 2000; 86 (10): 1069-1072

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the 3-dimensional behavior of plaque during coronary stent expansion. Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies, preintervention, and poststenting were evaluated in 32 patients treated with a single-balloon expandable tubular stent. External elastic membrane (EEM), lumen, stent, and plaque + media cross-sectional area were measured at 1-mm intervals through the entire stent as well as proximal and distal reference segments 5 mm from the stent edge. Volumetric calculations were based on Simpson's rule. Overall, the plaque + media volume through the entire lesion did not change during stent expansion (218 +/- 51 vs 217 +/- 47 mm3, p = 0.69). However, EEM and lumen volume increased significantly (EEM volume, 391 +/- 84 vs 448 +/- 87 mm3 [p < 0.0001]; lumen volume, 173 +/- 52 vs 231 +/- 54 mm3 [p < 0.0001]). The change in lumen volume correlated strongly with the change in EEM volume (r = 0.85, p < 0.0001), but poorly with the change in plaque + media volume (r = 0.37, p = 0.03). Plaque + media volume decreased in the midstent zone (59 +/- 14 vs 53 +/- 11 mm3, p = 0.0005), and increased in the distal stent zone (40 +/- 11 vs 44 +/- 9 mm3, p = 0.003), but did not change in either the proximal stent zone or reference segments. The mechanism of stent expansion is a combination of vessel stretch and plaque redistribution, translating disease accumulation from the midstent zone to the distal stent zone.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000165185500003

    View details for PubMedID 11074201

  • Troglitazone reduces neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus - A serial intravascular ultrasound study JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Takagi, T., Akasaka, T., Yamamuro, A., Honda, Y., Hozumi, T., Morioka, S., Yoshida, K. 2000; 36 (5): 1529-1535

    Abstract

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether troglitazone reduces neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).Increased in-stent restenosis in patients with diabetes mellitus is due to accelerated neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation. Troglitazone inhibits intimal hyperplasia in experimental animal models.We studied 62 stented lesions in 52 patients with plasma glucose levels (PG) > or = 11.1 mmol/liter at 2 h after 75 g oral glucose load. The study patients were randomized into two groups: the troglitazone group of 25 patients with 29 stents, who were treated with 400 mg of troglitazone, and the control group of 27 patients with 33 stents. All patients underwent oral glucose tolerance tests before and after their six-month treatment period. The sum of PG (sum of PG) and the sum of insulin levels (sum of IRI) were measured. Serial (postintervention and at six-month follow-up) intravascular ultrasound studies were performed. Cross-sectional images within stents were taken at every 1 mm, using an automatic pullback. Stent areas (SA), lumen areas (LA), and intimal areas (IA = SA - LA) were measured and averaged over a number of selected image slices. The intimal index was calculated as intimal index = averaged IA/averaged SA x 100%.There were no differences between the two groups before treatment in sum of PG (31.35 +/- 3.07 mmol/liter vs. 32.89 +/- 4.87 mmol/liter, respectively, p = 0.2998) and sum of IRI (219.6 +/- 106.2 mU/liter vs. 209.2 +/- 91.6 mU/liter, respectively, p = 0.8934). However, reductions in sum of PG at the six-month follow-up in the troglitazone group were significantly greater than those in the control group (-21.4 +/- 8.8% vs. -4.5 +/- 7.4%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Likewise, decreases in sum of IRI were greater in the troglitazone-treated group (-31.4 +/- 17.9% vs. -1.9 +/- 15.1%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Although, there were no differences between the two groups in SA at postintervention (7.4 +/- 2.2 mm2 vs. 7.3 +/- 1.7 mm2, respectively, p = 0.9482) and at follow-up (7.3 +/- 2.3 mm2 vs. 7.3 +/- 1.8 mm2, respectively, p = 0.2307), the LA at follow-up in the troglitazone group was significantly greater than that in the control group (5.3 +/- 1.7 mm2 vs. 3.7 +/- 1.7 mm2, respectively, p = 0.0002). The IA at follow-up in the troglitazone group was significantly smaller than that in the control group (2.0 +/- 0.9 mm2 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.8 mm2, respectively, p < 0.0001). This was also true for intimal index (27.1 +/- 11.5% vs. 49.0 +/- 14.4%, respectively, p < 0.0001).Serial intravascular ultrasound assessment shows that administration of troglitazone reduces neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation in patients with NIDDM.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000165171500013

    View details for PubMedID 11079654

  • Sirolimus (rapamycin) halts and reverses progression of allograft vascular disease in non-human primates TRANSPLANTATION Ikonen, T. S., Gummert, J. F., Hayase, M., Honda, Y., Hausen, B., Christians, U., Berry, G. J., Yock, P. G., Morris, R. E. 2000; 70 (6): 969-975

    Abstract

    Current immunosuppressive protocols fail to prevent chronic rejection often manifested as graft vascular disease (GVD) in solid organ transplant recipients. Several new immunosuppressants including sirolimus, a dual function growth factor antagonist, have been discovered, but studies of drug efficacy have been hampered by the lack of a model of GVD in primates, as a prelude to clinical trials. As described earlier, we have developed a novel non-human primate model of GVD where progression of GVD is quantified by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).Twelve cynomolgus monkeys underwent aortic transplantation from blood group compatible but mixed lymphocyte reaction-mismatched donors. To allow the development of GVD in the allograft, no treatment was administered for the first 6 weeks. Six monkeys were treated orally with sirolimus from day 45 after transplantation to day 105.Progression of GVD measured as change in intimal area from day 42 to 105 was halted in sirolimus-treated monkeys compared to untreated monkeys (P<0.001, general linear model). On day 105, the intimal area +/- SEM was 3.7+/-1.0 and 6.4+/-0.5 mm2, respectively (P<0.05, t test). The magnitude of allograft intimal area on day 105 correlated inversely with sirolimus trough levels (R2=0.67, P<0.05). Regression of the intimal area was seen in four of six sirolimus-treated monkeys, which was significantly different from the untreated monkeys (P<0.05).Our results in the first non-human primate model of GVD showed that treatment with sirolimus not only halted the progression of preexisting GVD but also was associated with partial regression. Sirolimus trough blood levels were correlated with efficacy. Therefore, sirolimus has the potential to control clinical chronic allograft rejection.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000089710700014

    View details for PubMedID 11014651

  • Hyperinsulinemia during oral glucose tolerance test is associated with increased neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation in nondiabetic patients - A serial intravascular ultrasound study JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Takagi, T., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Kaji, S., Kawamoto, T., Honda, Y., Yamamuro, A., Hozumi, T., Morioka, S. 2000; 36 (3): 731-738

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether hyperinsulinemia during the oral glucose tolerance test is associated with increased neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation in nondiabetic patients.Although hyperinsulinemia induces increased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in experimental models, it has not been determined whether hyperinsulinemia is associated with increased neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation.Serial (postintervention and six-month follow-up) intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to study 67 lesions treated with Palmaz-Schatz stents in 55 nondiabetic patients. Cross-sectional images within stents were taken at every 1 mm, using an automatic pullback, and a neointimal index was calculated as the ratio between the averaged neointimal area and averaged stent area. All patients underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Plasma glucose (PG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured at baseline and 1 and 2 h after the glucose load. The sum of PGs (sigmaPG) and the sum of IRIs (sigmaIRI) were calculated. Body mass index (BMI), lipid levels, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were measured.There were 27 patients with normal glucose tolerance, and 28 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The neointimal index in patients with IGT was greater than that in patients with normal glucose tolerance (42.9 +/- 14% vs. 24.9 +/- 8.3%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Linear regression analysis showed that the neointimal index at follow-up correlated well with sigmaPG (p < 0.0001), fasting IRI (p < 0.0001), sigmaIRI (p < 0.0001), triglyceride level (p = 0.018), and BMI (p < 0.0001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that sigmaIRI (p = 0.0002) and sigmaPG (p = 0.0034) were the best predictors of the greater neointimal index at follow-up.Serial IVUS assessment shows that hyperinsulinemia during an oral glucose tolerance test is associated with increased neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation in nondiabetic patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000089152100012

    View details for PubMedID 10987592

  • Multidimensional assessment of graft vascular disease (GVD) in aortic grafts by serial intravascular ultrasound in rhesus monkeys TRANSPLANTATION Ikonen, T. S., Briffa, N., Gummert, J. F., Honda, Y., Hayase, M., Hausen, B., Billingham, M. E., Yock, P. G., Robbins, R. C., Morris, R. E. 2000; 70 (3): 420-429

    Abstract

    Graft vascular disease (GVD) is an incompletely understood process and the primary cause of late allograft failure. A nonhuman primate model was established to study the progression of GVD by using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).Aortic allografts were transplanted below the inferior mesenteric arteries (IMA) into 6 rhesus monkeys. Removed and re-implanted aortic segments between renal arteries, and the inferior mesenteric arteries served as autografts. IVUS was performed at days 0, 24, 52, 80, and 98 after transplantation. Vessel area (VA) and lumen area (LA) were measured from each cross-section at 0.5 mm intervals. Intimal index (II=100x (VA-LA/VA)) and corresponding vessel volumes were calculated for the whole grafts. Histologic features were assessed from autopsy samples using computerized morphometric method and a score from 0 to 3 for GVD (0=none, 3=severe).In allografts, vessel volume and luminal volume decreased significantly (P<0.05 for both) and the intimal index increased from 12% to 59% by day 98. These parameters remained unchanged in autografts. Histologic analysis of allografts showed concentric intimal hyperplasia and scattered mononuclear cell accumulations, whereas the autografts had only occasional eccentric intimal changes. The GVD-scores were significantly higher in allografts than in autografts (median 3 vs. 1, P=0.042).We introduce a nonhuman primate model of GVD that enables serial IVUS assessments of multiple parameters of GVD. Concentric intimal proliferation and decrease of vessel dimensions was observed in allografts as a consequence of alloimmunity. This is a potential new model for studying new therapies to prevent GVD or halt its progression.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000088863300006

    View details for PubMedID 10949182

  • Efficacies of sirolimus (rapamycin) and cyclosporine in allograft vascular disease in non-human primates: trough levels of sirolimus correlate with inhibition of progression of arterial intimal thickening. Transplant international Ikonen, T. S., Gummert, J. F., Serkova, N., Hayase, M., Honda, Y., Kobayase, Y., Hausen, B., Yock, P. G., Christians, U., Morris, R. E. 2000; 13: S314-20

    Abstract

    We investigated the efficacies of sirolimus (rapamycin) and cyclosporine for inhibition of graft vascular disease (GVD) in cynomolgus monkey recipients of aortic allografts. Increases in arterial intimal thickening in the midgraft (six consecutive cross-sections) after transplantation were quantified by serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) from day 21 to day 105. These data enabled correlations between changes in intimal indexes [II = (intimal area/vessel area) x 100] and trough levels of sirolimus and cyclosporine to be determined. Eighteen recipients received no immunosuppression for 6 weeks to allow alloimmune injury to occur. On day 45, monkeys were treated daily with sirolimus (n = 6) or cyclosporine (n = 6); six monkeys remained untreated. II increased significantly from day 63 to day 105 in untreated monkeys and monkeys treated with cyclosporine, whereas monkeys treated with sirolimus did not have a significant increase in II (P = 0.008, P = 0.006, P = NS; paired t-test). The change in II from days 63 to 105 was significantly greater in untreated monkeys compared to sirolimus-treated monkeys (P = 0.13; one-way ANOVA, P = 0.012 Tukey's post hoc test); other post hoc pairwise comparisons were not significant. Mean sirolimus and cyclosporine levels +/- SEM were 43 +/- 7 ng/ml and 562 +/- 20 ng/ml, respectively. Sirolimus trough levels, but not cyclosporine levels, correlated inversely with changes in II from day 42 to 105 (r2 = 0.73, P = 0.03). This non-human primate study shows that inhibition of intimal thickening by sirolimus depends on trough levels and provides the rationale for clinical trials of sirolimus for the control of GVD in organ transplant recipients.

    View details for PubMedID 11112022

  • Intravascular ultrasound Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease Honda Y, Kobayashi Y 2000: 104-115
  • Feasibility of in vivo intravascular ultrasound tissue characterization in the detection of early vascular transplant rejection CIRCULATION Jeremias, A., Kolz, M. L., Ikonen, T. S., Gummert, J. F., Oshima, A., Hayase, M., Honda, Y., Komiyama, N., Berry, G. J., Morris, R. E., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 1999; 100 (21): 2127-2130

    Abstract

    Unprocessed ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) signal analysis has been shown to distinguish different tissue structures more reliably than gray-scale interpretation of conventional ultrasound images.The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) RF signal analysis in an animal model of allograft rejection. Six cynomolgus monkeys underwent transplantation of 3-cm aortic allograft segments distal to the renal arteries from immunologically mismatched donors. IVUS imaging with a 30-MHz system was performed 84 to 105 days after the operation. RF signals were acquired from cross sections of the recipient and the allograft aortas in real time with a digitizer at 500 MHz with 8-bit resolution. Sixty-five cross sections and 68 regions of interest (31 in host aorta and 37 in allograft) were analyzed in the adventitial layer with a total number of 8568 vectors processed. For each region of interest, a weighted-average attenuation was calculated on the basis of the attenuation and length for each individual vector. Histological examination was performed at every cross section imaged by IVUS. When the gray-scale images of conventional IVUS scored by an independent observer were compared, no distinction between adventitia of the native aorta and allograft was possible. Analysis of the average RF backscatter power also showed no significant difference (70.32+/-3.55 versus 70.72+/-3.38 dB). However, the average attenuation of allografts was significantly lower than that of the host aortas (2.64+/-1.38 versus 4.02+/-1.16 dB/mm, P<0.001). Histology demonstrated a marked adventitial inflammatory response in all allografts, with no inflammation observed in the host aortas.In vivo IVUS tissue characterization can be performed during routine imaging. In this model of transplant vasculopathy, RF attenuation measurements were more sensitive than visual or quantitative gray-scale analysis.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000083945000005

    View details for PubMedID 10571969

  • Impact of residual plaque burden on clinical outcomes of coronary interventions CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS Honda, Y., Yock, P. G., Fitzgerald, P. J. 1999; 46 (3): 265-276

    Abstract

    In this study, we summarize the role of residual plaque burden, as determined by intravascular ultrasound, on the development of restenosis following percutaneus coronary interventions. Several clinical trials have shown that the amount of residual plaque is a consistent and independent predictor of subsequent restenosis. The impact of residual plaque burden on late lumen loss is particularly augmented by negative vessel remodeling that is commonly seen after balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. However, early evidence suggests that the importance of plaque burden also applies in the context of stenting. The cotreatment of debulking may further improve the long-term outcome of stenting by maximizing an acute lumen gain with less vessel stretching, preventing stent edge problems and possibly reducing the cell source involved in the intimal hyperplastic process. Evaluation of residual plaque burden with on-line intravascular ultrasound could lead to definitive therapies via risk stratification of the treated segments.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079175800003

    View details for PubMedID 10348121

  • Intravascular ultrasound Textbook of Interventional Cardiology Yock PG, Fitzgerald PJ, Honda Y 1999: 801-818
  • A new large-animal model for research of graft vascular disease TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS Gummert, J. F., Ikonen, T., Briffa, N., Honda, Y., Hayase, M., Perlroth, J., Kobayashi, Y., Hausen, B., Barlow, C., Billingham, M. E., Fitzgerald, P., Yock, P. G., Robbins, R. C., Morris, R. E. 1998; 30 (8): 4023-4023

    View details for Web of Science ID 000077593000033

    View details for PubMedID 9865284

  • Stanford University Medical Center The Circulation Frontier Honda Y 1998; 2 (3): 81-84
  • Quantitative Assessment of Cardiac Hemodynamics by Doppler Echocardiography Honda Y, Yoshikawa J, Nishimura RA, Watanabe H, Yamamuro A 1998
  • Impact of curve distortion errors on intravascular ultrasound measurements and three-dimensional reconstructions AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Schwarzacher, S. P., Honda, Y., Metz, J. A., Asvar, C. A., Fitzgerald, P. J., Yock, P. G. 1997; 79 (3): 384-?

    Abstract

    Intravascular ultrasound distortion errors and longitudinal reconstructions are primarily determined by the angle of curvature. The error in commonly encountered angles is relatively small.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WG53700029

    View details for PubMedID 9036768

  • The value of IVUS guidance in directional atherectomy Current Review of Interventional Cardiology Honda Y, Yock PG, Fitzgerald PJ 1997: 1-11
  • Phonocardiography Evidence Based Medicine Honda Y, Yoshikawa J 1997: 478-481
  • Use of intravascular ultrasound for in vivo assessment of changes in intimal thickness of angiographically normal saphenous vein grafts one year after aortocoronary bypass surgery HEART Hozumi, T., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., Okura, H. 1996; 76 (4): 317-320

    Abstract

    To use intravascular ultrasound in vivo to evaluate changes in the intimal thickness of angiographically normal saphenous vein grafts one year after implantation.Fifteen saphenous vein grafts in 12 patients were examined one month and 12 months after aortocoronary bypass graft surgery with intravascular ultrasound using a 30 MHz transducer. None of the grafts examined showed any angiographic abnormalities. The intimal thickness and intimal area of the graft in the proximal portion were measured on intravascular ultrasound images obtained one month and 12 months after operation.General hospital.Twelve patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass graft surgery.The ultrasound images showed a thin-walled graft with a thin intima one month after operation (mean (SD)) (0.31 (0.09) mm). The intimal thickness of the graft increased significantly to 0.65 (0.08) mm (P < 0.001) 12 months after operation. The intimal area of the graft was 0.90 (0.80) mm2 one month after operation. 12 months after operation the intimal area had increased significantly to 5.26 (1.38) mm2 (P < 0.001).Intravascular ultrasound in vivo showed that one year after implantation angiographically normal saphenous vein grafts had a thicker intima than one month after implantation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996VL97100008

    View details for PubMedID 8983677

  • [Prognostic value of serial Doppler echocardiographic follow-up of transmitral flow patterns in patients with congestive heart failure who presented with pulmonary edema]. Journal of cardiology Yamamuro, A., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Hozumi, T., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., Okura, H., Yoshikawa, J. 1996; 27 (6): 321-327

    Abstract

    The predictive value of serial Doppler echocardiographic follow-up of transmitral flow patterns for the prognosis of patients with congestive heart failure who presented with pulmonary edema was evaluated in 80 consecutive patients with decreased left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction < 40%). Restrictive patterns [peak early diastolic filling velocity (E)/peak late diastolic filling velocity (A) ratio (E/A) > 2 and/or deceleration time for E wave to decline to baseline (DcT) < 150 msec] were observed in 72 patients (90%) on admission. After intensive therapy, DcT showed a nonrestrictive pattern in 38 of 72 patients (53%). The survival rates at 1 year was 50% for the restrictive group, and 97% for the nonrestrictive group. E/A showed a nonrestrictive pattern in 37 of 56 patients (66%). The survival rates at 1 year was 86% for the restrictive group, and 58% for the nonrestrictive group. Serial Doppler echocardiographic follow-up of transmitral flow patterns is useful in predicting the prognosis in patients with congestive heart failure who presented with pulmonary edema.

    View details for PubMedID 9062593

  • [Phasic flow velocity characteristics of the right coronary artery in patients with aortic stenosis: a Doppler guide wire study]. Journal of cardiology Okura, H., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Shakudo, M., Hozumi, T., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., Yamamuro, A., Watanabe, H., Yoshikawa, J. 1996; 27 (5): 255-259

    Abstract

    This study investigated the characteristics of the phasic flow velocity pattern of the right coronary artery and the relationship to hemodynamic parameters in patients with aortic stenosis. Coronary flow velocities were recorded at the proximal (segment 1) and the distal (segment 4PD) portion of the right coronary artery using a Doppler guide wire (0.014-in, 15 MHz) in 10 patients with aortic stenosis and 8 control subjects with normal coronary arteries. The diastolic to systolic peak velocity ratio at both the proximal and distal portion were significantly greater in patients with aortic stenosis than in control subjects. Systolic flow reversal was not seen in the right coronary artery in control subjects, but it was observed in 5 patients (50%) at the proximal portion and in 10 patients (100%) at the distal portion. Peak velocity of flow reversal at the distal portion showed a significant correlation with mean pressure gradient across the aortic valve (y = -1.3x + 37.3, r = 0.71, p = 0.02). Systolic flow reversal is characteristic in the right coronary artery, especially at the distal portion, in patients with aortic stenosis. This may be related to the pressure difference across the aortic valve through the posterior descending artery.

    View details for PubMedID 8642513

  • [Evaluation of left ventricular volume and ejection fraction using three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography]. Journal of cardiology Yagi, T., Yoshida, K., Hozumi, T., Akasaka, T., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., OHKURA, H., Yamamuro, A., Yoshikawa, J. 1996; 27 (4): 207-210

    Abstract

    Left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction (EF) derived from three-dimensional echocardiography using a multiplane transesophageal probe (3D-TEE) were compared with LV volume and EF obtained from left ventriculography (LVG) in 14 patients (mean age: 61 years). Left ventricular volumes were calculated using a summation of disks algorithm based on multiple reconstructed short-axis cross-sections from 3D data. Left ventricular volume (end-diastole and end-systole) and EF from 3D-TEE were compared with those from LVG using linear regression analysis. Three-dimensional TEE demonstrated excellent correlations with LVG for measuring LV volume (r = 0.97, SEE = 11 ml) and EF (r = 0.95, SEE-4%), respectively. Three-dimensional TEE is useful for the measurement of LV volume and EF in the clinical setting.

    View details for PubMedID 8642507

  • Value and limitations of 'aortic valve resistance' in assessing severity of aortic stenosis in patients with low pressure gradient : a clinical study using dobutamine stress echocardiography Jpn J Med Ultrasonics Okura H, Yoshida K, Akasaka T, Shakudo M, Hozumi T, Takagi T, Honda Y, Yamamuro A, Yoshikawa J 1996; 23 (4): 287
  • [Value and limitations of valve resistance in assessing prosthetic aortic valve function: clinical study using dobutamine stress doppler echocardiography]. Journal of cardiology Okura, H., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Shakudo, M., Hozumi, T., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., Yamamuro, A. 1996; 27 (1): 9-13

    Abstract

    Hemodynamic resistance may be a useful index for the severity of valvular aortic stenosis, but little is known about the utility of valve resistance in assessing the prosthetic aortic valve function. This study investigated whether valve resistance is useful in assessing prosthetic valve function in 13 patients with normally functioning CarboMedics prosthetic aortic valves. Transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area and valve resistance derived from two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography were calculated before and after dobutamine infusion. Dobutamine was infused incrementally (3-12 micrograms/kg/min) under echocardiographic imaging. Transvalvular pressure gradient (24 +/- 7-->53 +/- 18 mmHg, p < 0.01) and valve resistance (102 +/- 32-->140 +/- 57 dynes.sec.cm-5, p < 0.01) significantly increased after dobutamine infusion. However, effective orifice area did not increase significantly (1.1 +/- 0.5-->1.2 +/- 0.5 cm2). These findings indicate that transvalvular pressure gradient and valve resistance are flow-dependent and should be treated with caution when assessing prosthetic valve function.

    View details for PubMedID 8683434

  • [Intravascular ultrasound scanning assessment of plaque distribution in the left anterior descending coronary artery just distal to the bifurcation]. Journal of cardiology Watanabe, H., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Hozumi, T., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., Okura, H., Yamamuro, A. 1995; 26 (6): 325-329

    Abstract

    Coronary plaque has a distinct spatial distribution with the peak incidence on the outer wall around the bifurcation of the left main coronary artery. Intravascular ultrasound scanning was used to evaluate the distribution of the plaque in the proximal site of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 16 patients. Coronary angiography showed the examined sites were normal in all patients. A cross-sectional coronary scan was recorded in the left anterior descending coronary artery just distal to the bifurcation using a 4.3 Fr, 30 MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter. The thickness of the plaque was measured at 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees, where 0 degree indicates the left circumflex coronary artery branching direction. The scan was divided into four areas of 90 degrees and labeled 1 to 4 in the counterclockwise direction (site 1 was the left circumflex coronary artery branching direction). The thickness and area of the plaque were measured in each site. The percentage plaque fraction was calculated as (plaque area in each site)/(plaque area of all) x 100. In 15 (94%) of the 16 patients, images of crescent shaped plaques were obtained. The mean thicknesses of the plaque at sites 1-4 were 0.25 +/- 0.07 mm, 0.46 +/- 0.21 mm, 0.82 +/- 0.19 mm, and 0.42 +/- 0.23 mm, respectively. The mean percentage plaque fractions were 7.9 +/- 3.6% (site 1), 18.1 +/- 7.2% (site 2), 55.0 +/- 8.1% (site 3), 18.7 +/- 6.9% (site 4), respectively. In site 3, opposite to the left circumflex coronary artery branching, the thickness and percentage plaque fraction were significantly greater than the remaining three sites (p < 0.001). In vivo intravascular ultrasound scanning revealed that coronary plaque in angiographically normal left anterior descending coronary artery just distal to the bifurcation has a distinct distribution with a peak incidence opposite to the left circumflex coronary artery branching.

    View details for PubMedID 8558410

  • [Pseudoxanthoma elasticum associated with unstable angina and Leriche syndrome: a case report]. Journal of cardiology Hiragi, T., Yoshikawa, J., Okura, H., Honda, Y., Akasaka, T. 1995; 26 (1): 43-49

    Abstract

    A 64-year-old man with a history of intermittent claudication presented with chest pain. On admission, he had yellowish papules with a "plucked chicken" appearance on his neck. Histological examination of the biopsy specimen of the lesion revealed degeneration and calcification of elastic fibers in the dermis. His daughter also had similar histological changes in the skin. The diagnosis was pseudoxanthoma elasticum. Fundoscopic examination revealed angioid streaks. Electrocardiography showed inverted T waves in V2-V6, and echocardiography revealed hypokinesis in the anterior wall of the left ventricle. Emergency catheterization showed 90% stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery, total occlusion of the abdominal aorta, and severe stenosis in the right subclavian artery. He was treated medically and had no recurrent episodes of chest pain. A careful examination for cardiovascular diseases should be considered in patients with pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    View details for PubMedID 7666344

  • [Detection of hibernating myocardium in patients with myocardial infarction by low-dose dobutamine echocardiography: comparison with thallium-201 scintigraphy with reinjection]. Journal of cardiology Takagi, T., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Honda, Y., Yonezawa, Y., Shakudo, M. 1995; 25 (4): 155-161

    Abstract

    The identification of hibernating myocardium is important for selecting patients who will benefit from coronary revascularization. The relationship between echocardiographic and radioisotopic markers of hibernating myocardium and postrevascularization recovery of myocardial function was investigated in 21 patients who underwent successful revascularization. Each patient underwent low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography and thallium-201 (201Tl) scintigraphy with reinjection before revascularization. The presence of contractile reserve in dobutamine stress echocardiography and Tl uptake in 201Tl scintigraphy with reinjection were defined as markers of hibernating myocardium. Follow-up echocardiograms were evaluated for improved regional wall motion in all patients at a mean of 8.6 months after revascularization. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography for indicating recovery of function after revascularization were 75.0%, 77.8%, 81.8%, and 70.0%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 201Tl scintigraphy with reinjection for indicating recovery of function after revascularization were 91.7%, 55.6%, 73.3%, and 83.3%, respectively. There were no statistical differences between low-dose dobutamine echocardiography and 201Tl scintigraphy in predicting postrevascularization recovery of function patients with hibernating myocardium.

    View details for PubMedID 7752049

  • [Relationship between regional flow reserve supplied by the great saphenous vein graft and regional left ventricular wall motion: a Doppler guide wire study]. Journal of cardiology Fukuda, H., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Shakudo, M., Takagi, T., Hozumi, T., Maeda, K., Miyake, S., Honda, Y. 1995; 25 (2): 83-88

    Abstract

    The relationship between regional flow reserve supplied by a great saphenous vein graft and myocardial infarction and anterior wall motion assessed by left ventriculography was studied in 28 patients with no stenosis in the great saphenous vein graft and the peripheral site of the recipient left anterior descending coronary arteries. The proximal segment to the anastomosis was totally or subtotally occluded. The resting graft blood flow velocity was measured using a Doppler guide wire, then 0.56 mg/kg of dipyridamole was injected for 4 minutes intravenously and the resultant increase in graft blood flow velocity was recorded. The regional flow reserve of the anterior wall supplied by great saphenous vein grafts in 11 patients with anterior myocardial infarction (MI group) was significantly lower than that in 17 patients without myocardial infarction (non-MI group) (1.5 +/- 0.3 vs 2.6 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01). The flow reserve supplied by great saphenous vein grafts in 11 patients with normal anterior wall motion was 2.8 +/- 0.7, 10 with hypokinesis 1.9 +/- 0.3, and with akinesis 1.3 +/- 0.3. Reduced anterior wall motion induced a significant decrease in the flow reserve of the anterior wall supplied by the great saphenous vein graft (p < 0.01). The anterior wall motion score of four segments assessed by left ventriculography showed a significant correlation with the flow reserve of the anterior wall supplied by the great saphenous vein graft (y = -0.24 x + 3.7, r = 0.75, p < 0.001). The results show infarcted myocardium was an important influence on coronary flow reserve.

    View details for PubMedID 7897611

  • [Assessment of coronary stenosis severity using a Doppler guide wire in vivo: is the continuity equation applicable to moderate to severe coronary artery stenosis?]. Journal of cardiology Hozumi, T., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Shakudo, M., Takagi, T., Honda, Y., Okura, H. 1995; 25 (1): 1-7

    Abstract

    The usefulness of a Doppler guide wire was evaluated in the estimation of coronary stenosis severity in patients with moderate to severe coronary stenosis using the continuity equation. The maximal coronary flow velocities (V) proximal to the stenosis (p), at the stenosis (s), and distal to the stenosis (d) were measured using a Doppler guide wire (12-MHz, 0.018-in) in 12 patients with mild coronary stenosis (less than 50% diameter stenosis: group A) and 12 patients with moderate to severe coronary stenosis (more than 50% diameter stenosis: group B). Percent diameter stenosis (%DS) was calculated from Vp/Vs by: %DS = (1 - square root of Vp/Vs) x 100 (%) (Vp = the maximal velocity proximal to the stenosis; Vs = the peak velocity at the stenotic site) Percent DS was calculated from Vd/Vs by: %DS = (1 - square root of Vd/Vs) x 100 (%) (Vd = the peak velocity distal to the stenosis) Regression of Doppler-derived %DS from Vp/Vs compared to quantitative coronary angiographic % DS were: Group A: y = 0.83x + 3.0 (r = 0.79), Group B: y = 0.63x + 9.4 (r = 0.81), Overall: y = 0.63x + 9.6 (r = 0.91) Regression of Doppler-derived %DS from Vd/Vs compared to quantitative coronary angiographic %DS were: Group A: y = 0.98x - 1.0 (r = 0.81), Group B: y = 0.67x + 14.6 (r = 0.84), Overall: y = 0.79x + 7.6 (r = 0.91) The continuity equation method using a Doppler guide wire underestimates coronary stenosis severity in patients with moderate to severe coronary stenosis, although Doppler-derived %DS is correlated with angiographic %DS.

    View details for PubMedID 7877097

  • [Usefulness and limitations of dobutamine stress echocardiography for detection of coronary artery disease]. Journal of cardiology Takagi, T., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Akasaka, T., Honda, Y., Maenishi, A. 1994; 24 (5): 347-355

    Abstract

    The value of dobutamine stress echocardiography for detecting coronary artery disease was evaluated in 67 patients with normal left ventricular wall motion at rest who also underwent quantitative angiography. The overall sensitivity and specificity of dobutamine stress echocardiography for detecting coronary artery disease were 83% and 70%, respectively. The sensitivities for detecting multivessel disease and single vessel disease were 92% and 76%, respectively. The sensitivity of dobutamine stress echocardiography was 91% in patients treated without beta-blocker, and 70% in patients treated with beta-blocker (p < 0.001). The relatively low peak heart rate during dobutamine infusion in patients treated with beta-blocker seems to affect the sensitivity of dobutamine stress echocardiography. There were no severe complications during dobutamine infusion. Dobutamine stress echocardiography is a safe and accurate method for detecting coronary artery disease. However, an additional technique to increase peak heart rate in patients treated with beta-blocker such as injection of atropin should be considered.

    View details for PubMedID 7932068

  • Aortic dissection: early diagnosis and treatment Gendai-Iryo Honda Y, Akasaka T, Yoshikawa J 1994; 26 (1): 233-238
  • Intravascular ultrasound imaging in renal bifurcation with a reference to the location and development of atherosclerosis Jpn J Med Ultrasonics Fukuda H, Yoshikawa J, Yoshida K, Akasaka T, Shakudo M, Hozumi T, Miyake S, Honda Y 1994; 21: 451-454
  • Syndrome X and coronary angiography Practical Cardiology Honda Y, Akasaka T 1994; 2: 94-96
  • The effect of a trackball-derived region of interest on left ventricular volume using an acoustic quantification method Jpn J Med Ultrasonics Yagi T, Yoshikawa J, Yoshida K, Akasaka T, Shakudo M, Hozumi T, Miyake S, Okura H, Honda Y 1994; 21: 489-494
  • [Clinical characteristics and surgical treatment of atrial septal defect in adults]. Japanese circulation journal Akasaka, T., Yoshikawa, J., Yoshida, K., Hozumi, T., Honda, Y., Okura, H., Yamamuro, A. 1994; 58: 1250-1254

    View details for PubMedID 7699769

Conference Proceedings


  • High prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia amongst Asian Americans Chan, A. Q., Kushida, C., Mandreza, R. A., Chen, Z. W., Chan, M. P. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2003: E158-E158

    View details for Web of Science ID 000187070100004

    View details for PubMedID 14662694

  • Impact of insulin resistance on neointimal tissue proliferation after coronary stent implantation - Intravascular ultrasound studies Takagi, T., Akasaka, T., Yamamuro, A., Honda, Y., Hozumi, T., Morioka, S., Yoshida, K. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2002: 50-55

    Abstract

    Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies in 55 nondiabetic patients showed that neointimal tissue proliferation after stent implantation in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was greater than that in patients with normal glucose tolerance at follow-up. Multiple regression analysis showed that the sum of insulin levels was the best predictor of the greater neointimal index at follow-up. Another group of serial IVUS studies were performed in 62 stented lesions in 52 patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The study patients were randomized into a troglitazone group and a control group. The neointimal tissue proliferation at follow-up in the troglitazone group was significantly smaller than that in the control group.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000174300400011

    View details for PubMedID 11872367

  • Development of models of graft vascular disease in nonhuman primates: Evaluation of GVD by intravascular ultrasound in a new cynomolgus model with arterial allograft exchange Ikonen, T. S., Gummert, J. F., Honda, Y., Hayase, M., Perlroth, J., Hausen, B., Barlow, C., Fitzgerald, P., Yock, P. G., Morris, R. E. ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 1999: 687-687

    View details for Web of Science ID 000078960600305

    View details for PubMedID 10083296

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