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Academic Appointments


Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Neuromuscular physiology
Immunology of myasthenia gravis

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Inhibition of autoreactive antibody effects with antibody feedings: a pilot study JOURNAL OF NEUROIMMUNOLOGY Hofmann, W. W., Smith, M. E. 1999; 96 (1): 1-8

    Abstract

    This study seeks to determine if tolerance to autoreactive antibody can be achieved by exposing gut-associated lymphocytic tissue (GALT) to the protein. The method involved immunizing rats with AchR after feeding anti-AchR purified from myasthenic plasma or non-specific, pooled human immunoglobulins. Both feedings improved the neuromuscular block of EAMG, the commercial preparation requiring a tenfold increase in protein concentration. Despite its protective effect, antibody feeding was associated with late levels of serum anti-AchR considerably above those in immunized controls. The hypothesis presented is that the tolerance results from enhanced anti-idiotype production.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079707500001

    View details for PubMedID 10227419

  • COMPARISON OF STIMULATION AND INSULIN EFFECTS ON DENERVATED MOUSE SOLEUS MUSCLES MUSCLE & NERVE Hofmann, W. W. 1991; 14 (8): 748-755

    Abstract

    A comparison has been made between the responses of denervated mouse soleus muscles to direct electrical stimulation, as reported by earlier workers, and to incubation with supraphysiological concentrations of insulin. The parameters of interest were resting membrane potential (RMP), qualities of the active state, the amount of alpha bungarotoxin (BUTX) binding, and chemosensitivity, as measured by the strength of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractures. In all aspects, the changes recorded after insulin, were in the same direction as with direct stimulation, however, owing to the time limitations of in vitro testing, were smaller. It is suggested that the effects of electric shocks on denervated muscles are the result of activation of the insulin receptor, or some similar macromolecule, which appears to be sensitive to the membrane potential. The possible interrelations between acetylcholine and insulin receptors in neurotrophic control are discussed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FY46700008

    View details for PubMedID 1890999

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