Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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  • Beyond the margins: real-time detection of cancer using targeted fluorophores. Nature reviews. Clinical oncology Zhang, R. R., Schroeder, A. B., Grudzinski, J. J., Rosenthal, E. L., Warram, J. M., Pinchuk, A. N., Eliceiri, K. W., Kuo, J. S., Weichert, J. P. 2017

    Abstract

    Over the past two decades, synergistic innovations in imaging technology have resulted in a revolution in which a range of biomedical applications are now benefiting from fluorescence imaging. Specifically, advances in fluorophore chemistry and imaging hardware, and the identification of targetable biomarkers have now positioned intraoperative fluorescence as a highly specific real-time detection modality for surgeons in oncology. In particular, the deeper tissue penetration and limited autofluorescence of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging improves the translational potential of this modality over visible-light fluorescence imaging. Rapid developments in fluorophores with improved characteristics, detection instrumentation, and targeting strategies led to the clinical testing in the early 2010s of the first targeted NIR fluorophores for intraoperative cancer detection. The foundations for the advances that underline this technology continue to be nurtured by the multidisciplinary collaboration of chemists, biologists, engineers, and clinicians. In this Review, we highlight the latest developments in NIR fluorophores, cancer-targeting strategies, and detection instrumentation for intraoperative cancer detection, and consider the unique challenges associated with their effective application in clinical settings.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nrclinonc.2016.212

    View details for PubMedID 28094261

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

Home | Stanford Medicine

Latest information on COVID-19

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic. Get the latest news on COVID-19 testing, treatment, tracking data, and medical research.

Racism and discrimination are direct affronts to Stanford Medicine?s values. Read our leaders? pledge on racial equity.

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine has a long tradition of leadership in pioneering research, creative teaching protocols and effective clinical therapies.

Analyzing a national cancer database, Stanford Medicine researchers find a bump in diagnoses at 65, suggesting that many wait for Medicare to kick in before they seek care.

Our scientists have launched dozens of research projects as part of the global response to COVID-19. Some aim to prevent, diagnose and treat the disease; others aim to understand how it spreads and how people?s immune systems respond to it.

A Stanford Medicine team offered guidance in crafting a COVID-19 response for the Oglala Lakota Nation.

Medical students recently learned where they would be heading for their residencies.

Sharon Hampton is focusing on patient equity as a nursing leader at Stanford Health Care. Getting to know patients and staff is key, she says.

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