School of Medicine


Showing 10,301-10,349 of 10,349 Results

  • Yuyin Zhou

    Yuyin Zhou

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Radiology

    Bio Yuyin Zhou is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford. Her research interests span the fields of medical image computing, computer vision, and machine learning, especially the intersection of them. Yuyin received her Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from Johns Hopkins University, advised by Bloomberg Distinguished Professor Alan Yuille. Her project with Johns Hopkins Medicine on organ segmentation has been featured on National Public Radio. Yuyin has published over 20 peer-reviewed papers including top-tier venues such as CVPR, ICCV, AAAI, MICCAI, TMI, and MedIA, and was the runner-up in MICCAI 2018 - Computational Precision Medicine: Pancreatic Cancer Survival Prediction Challenge. She also interned at Google Cloud AI and Google Brain.

  • Han zhu

    Han zhu

    Instructor, Medicine

    Bio Dr. Zhu is a general cardiologist with specialized clinical and research training in cardio-oncology and cardio-immunology. She focuses on the cardiovascular care of patients undergoing therapies for cancer, with a particular focus on the effects of immunotherapies on the heart. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship and internal medicine residency training at Stanford University School of Medicine. During her post-doctoral training, Dr. Zhu?s research focuses on myocarditis, cardiac inflammation, and the effects of cancer therapeutics on the cardiovascular system. Her current research employs clinical data, bio-banked samples, and animal models to study T-cell toxicities in the heart. Dr. Zhu's clinic sees cardio-oncology and cardio-immunology patients and focuses on devising new methods for minimizing cardiovascular complications in the cancer patient population.

  • Zenghao Zhu

    Zenghao Zhu

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

    Bio Zenghao Zhu received his BS in Thermal Energy and Power Engineering and his second BS in Law from China Jiliang University in 2012. He finished his master?s study in Power Engineering at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology in 2015. He obtained his Ph.D. degree from Villanova University in Mechanical Engineering in 2019. Zenghao is currently a postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Ó Maoiléidigh?s lab and is creating models of hair-bundle mechanics and mechanotransduction in hair bundles.

  • Maisa Ziadni, PhD

    Maisa Ziadni, PhD

    Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development and testing of novel interventions for chronic pain.
    Understanding mechanisms of treatment among patients with chronic with pain.
    Understanding predictors of opioid use among patients with chronic pain.

  • Thomas Zikos

    Thomas Zikos

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Bio I am initially a Pittsburgh, PA native, but have been at Stanford University since 2012 for residency, fellowship, and now as faculty. It is exciting to be affiliated with one of the most dynamic and innovative medical institutions worldwide.

    My clinical and research interests focus on functional, motility, and esophageal disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Outside of this sub-sub specialization, a significant portion of my practice is also devoted to the care of a broad range of ?general gastroenterology? concerns.

    Functional, motility, esophageal, and general gastroenterology disorders are very common, and can cause significant disability. Some examples include irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic nausea, chronic constipation, achalasia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Despite the common nature of these disorders, many are not well understood, leading to frustration among both patients and clinicians alike. Furthermore, there is an incorrect stigma associated with some of these disorders that ?it is all in your head.? On the opposite side of the spectrum, there is sometimes an incorrect assumption that we will be able to pinpoint an exact underlying cause in all cases, but this is not possible with current technology. We aim to bridge this gap using the latest diagnostic testing and treatment paradigms, as well as a healing hand. Additionally, our group is actively engaged in multiple research projects and studies to drive the future of the field.

    Though I am early in my career, I am hoping that by the end the field will look nothing like it does today. I am hopeful, and I believe that we can revolutionize the field to better characterize gastrointestinal disorders, and come up with highly effective targeted treatments.

  • Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Lindsey Eileen Zimmerman

    Affiliate, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Bio Lindsey Zimmerman, PhD, is a Clinical and Community Psychologist, and Implementation Scientist at the National Center for PTSD, Dissemination and Training Division of the Veterans Health Administration.

    Dr. Zimmerman is principal investigator of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Veterans Health Administration (VA) research that enlists participatory system dynamics to increase timely patient access to evidence-based pharmacotherapy and evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, PTSD, alcohol and opioid use disorder. See https://mtl.how/team



    Active NIH Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Audit and Feedback: A Cluster Randomized Trial of Mechanisms Of Implementation Change to Expand Reach of Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Health Care (R01DA046651)

    The most common reasons Veterans seek VA addiction and mental health care is for help with opioid and alcohol misuse, depression and PTSD. Research evidence has established highly effective treatments that prevent relapse, overdose and suicide, but even with policy mandates, performance metrics, and electronic health records to fix the problem, these treatments may only reach 3-28% of patients. This study tests participatory business engineering methods to better meet the addiction and mental health needs of Veterans and the U.S. population.


    Participatory System Dynamics for Evidence-Based Addiction and Mental Healthcare (R21DA042198)

    Limited access and delays to high-quality, evidence-based mental health and addiction treatments can lead to patients getting too little or ineffective care and contribute to chronic patient impairment, relapse, and death by suicide or overdose. This study evaluates a system for resolving problems with patient flow and organization in health care systems, using electronic medical record systems and a high-level of input from healthcare leadership, frontline providers and patients.


    Active VA Grants

    Participatory System Dynamics vs Usual Quality Improvement: Is Staff Use of Simulation an Effective, Scalable and Affordable Way to Improve Timely Veteran Access to High-quality Mental Health Care? (I01HX002521)

    Participatory system dynamics (PSD) helps improve quality with existing resources, critical in mental health and all VA health care. PSD uses learning simulations to improve staff decisions, showing how goals for quality can best be achieved given local resources and constraints. We aim to significantly increase the proportion of patients who start and complete evidence-based care, and determine the costs of using PSD for improvement.


    National Responsibilities

    2019 National Institutes of Health, Center for Scientific Review
    Community Influences on Health Behavior (CIHB) Study Section

    2019-present VA Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) 
    QUERI/Health Services Research & Development, Scientific Merit Review Committee

    2019-present Emory University
    Prolonged Exposure Consultant Training Program Advisory Board

    2018-present National Institutes of Health
    Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)
    Mental Health Faculty Mentor

    2015-2017 National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program
    National Institute of Mental Health Clinical Research Review Committee



    Teaching Responsibilities

    Quality Improvement and Systems of Care Competencies
    Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Residency, Stanford University School of Medicine & VA Palo Alto Health Care System

    Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program Seminar
    VA Palo Alto research centers of the National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD), Center for Innovation to Implementation (Ci2i), Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Care (MIRECC), and War-related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC).



    Open Science Resources for the Modeling to Learn Simulation Learning Program are available on GitHub at https://mtl.how and https://mtl.how/demo

  • Judith Zimmermann

    Judith Zimmermann

    Temp - Non-Exempt, Rad/Veterans Affairs

    Bio I am a visiting graduate student researcher under supervision of Dr. Dan Ennis at Radiological Sciences Laboratories and VA Palo Alto. My current research interests include in vitro cardiovascular magnetic resonance flow imaging, patient-specific image-based modeling, and quantitative flow image analysis. In collaboration with the 3DQLAB at Stanford Radiology, we have been devloping a fully MRI-compatible cardiovascular flow loop setup which is able to embed subject-specific and compliant vessel models under physiological pressure and flow conditions. One focus has been the integration of a patient-specific type-B aortic dissection model to study flow and pressure in true and false lumen.

  • Paul Zolkind

    Paul Zolkind

    Clinical Instructor, Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery Divisions

    Bio Dr. Zolkind is originally from New York. He completed an otolaryngology residency training at Washington University in Saint Louis. He is currently the Head and Neck Surgery/Microvascular Fellow at Stanford University. His clinical interests include cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, thyroid and salivary glands as well as complex reconstruction of the head and neck. His research interests include immunotherapy approaches for head and neck cancer. Outside the hospital he enjoys spending time with his family and friends, biking, running and hiking

  • Andrew Zolopa

    Andrew Zolopa

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Zolopa’s research applies a variety of clinical epidemiologic methods in an effort to optimize antiretroviral therapy and understand the impact of drug resistance on response to ARV. Areas of focus include the clinical application of resistance testing in optimizing antiretroviral therapy, clinical cohorts, trials of antiretroviral therapies and population-based epidemiologic evaluation of HIV resistance and efficacy of ARV therapy. More recently studies focused on premature aging in HIV.

  • Biyao Zou

    Biyao Zou

    Ph.D. Student in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, admitted Autumn 2018

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has been focusing on the disease and economic burden and risk factors of liver disease in the United States and Asia, with a special focus on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. I'm interested in utilizing advanced statistical methods such as meta-analysis and causal inference to deepen my research.

  • James Zou

    James Zou

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My group works on both foundations of statistical machine learning and applications in biomedicine and healthcare. We develop new technologies that make ML more accountable to humans, more reliable/robust and reveals core scientific insights.

    We want our ML to be impactful and beneficial, and as such, we are deeply motivated by transformative applications in biotech and health. We collaborate with and advise many academic and industry groups.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

    Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

    We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

  • Evan Zucker

    Evan Zucker

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    Bio Dr. Zucker is a board-certified pediatric and cardiovascular radiologist with a special interest in CT and MRI for congenital heart disease.

  • Donna Zulman

    Donna Zulman

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Health care delivery models for patients with complex medical, social and behavioral needs.
    - Interventions that address social determinants of health
    - Effective communication and relationship-building in the clinical context
    - Patient-facing technology (e.g., video-based care, eHealth technology) to facilitate access to health care

  • Corinna Zygourakis

    Corinna Zygourakis

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My goal is to translate research into real-world action and decision-making so that my work can impact patients and the institutions in which they receive care. With a research focus on healthcare cost and quality of care, I approach neurosurgery in a unique way?one that applies business operations, economics, and healthcare delivery principles to our field. I have pursued formal LEAN business training, and believe in the importance of working together with other departments and administrators, as well as physicians and surgeons on the hospital and national level, to effect change. During my residency, I developed and led a multi-departmental prospective study at UCSF called OR SCORE (OR Surgical Cost Reduction Project) that brought together surgeons from the neurosurgery, orthopedics and ENT departments with nurses and administrators. OR SCORE successfully reduced surgical supply costs by nearly one million dollars in its first year by providing >60 surgeons with price transparency scorecards. This work led to a first-author publication in JAMA Surgery, but more importantly, set the foundation for further quality improvement and cost reduction efforts across the UCSF hospital system.

    A volunteer neurosurgical mission trip to Guadalajara, Mexico, where limited resources create an OR environment that is strikingly more frugal than the U.S., inspired me to lead another project aimed at quantifying and reducing operating room waste at UCSF. I have also conducted research looking at the safety and outcomes of overlapping surgery, as well as several projects to define the factors underlying variation in cost for neurosurgical care using UCSF?s hospital data and national databases like the National Inpatient Sample, Vizient (formerly known as University Health Consortium), and Medicare.

    As a clinical fellow at Johns Hopkins, I continued and expanded these research efforts. I designed and implemented an Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) protocol at the Johns Hopkins Bayview hospital. This protocol standardized care for our spine patients, emphasizing pre-operative rehabilitation, psychiatric and nutritional assessments, and smoking cessation, as well as intra- and post-operative multi-modal pain therapy, early mobilization, and standardized antibiotic and bowel regimens. I also collaborated with engineers in the Johns Hopkins Carnegie Center for Surgical Innovation to develop better algorithms for intra-operative CT imaging, and provided assistance with operations to a basic science study looking at the role of cerebrospinal fluid drainage and duraplasty in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    At Stanford, I am building a research group focused on: (1) perfecting paradigms for delivery of high-end technology in spinal care, including robotics and navigation, (2) implementing cost and quality strategies in large healthcare systems, and (3) computational analysis of big-data to effect real-time risk stratification and decision making in spine surgery. I'm excited to collaborate with my peers across surgical and medical departments, as well as business and engineering colleagues.

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