School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 50 Results

  • Leah Backhus

    Leah Backhus

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Bio Leah Backhus trained in general surgery at the University of Southern California and cardiothoracic surgery at the University of California Los Angeles. She practices at Stanford Hospital and is Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the VA Palo Alto. Her surgical practice consists of general thoracic surgery with special emphasis on thoracic oncology and minimally invasive surgical techniques. She is also Co-Director of the Thoracic Surgery Clinical Research Program, and has grant funding through the Veterans Affairs Administration and NIH. Her current research interests are in imaging surveillance following treatment for lung cancer and cancer survivorship. She is a member of the National Lung Cancer Roundtable of the American Cancer Society serving as Chair of the Task Group on Lung Cancer in Women. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. As an educator, Dr. Backhus is the Associate Program Director for the Thoracic Track Residency and is the Chair of the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Thoracic Surgery which is the accrediting body for all cardiothoracic surgery training programs in the US.

  • Edward Bender

    Edward Bender

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Edward Bender specializes in the treatment of adult cardiac abnormalities, including ischemic heart disease, structural and valvular disease, and arrhythmias. Additionally, he has an interest and expertise in General Thoracic and Vascular surgery. Dr. Bender currently works with organizations within the medical community to develop software to aid in the teaching and practice of medicine.

  • Mark Berry, MD

    Mark Berry, MD

    Mylavarapu Rogers Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Thomas Burdon

    Thomas Burdon

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests New technologies in the area of catheters, clamps, and, visualization devices for aid in cardiac surgery; distribution of, cardioplegia, both anterograde and retrograde as determined by, techniques in technetium pyro-phosphate scans; glucose insulin, potassium as an adjunct in cardiac surgery.

  • James Fann

    James Fann

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiac surgery education and simulation-based learning, coronary artery bypass surgery, cardiac valve disease

  • Michael Fischbein

    Michael Fischbein

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular and genetic mechanisms of aortic aneurysm/dissection development. Molecular mechanisms of aneurysm formation in Marfan Syndrome. Clinical research interests include thoracic aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections).

  • Rabin Gerrah

    Rabin Gerrah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Rabin Gerrah is a cardiothoracic surgeon and specializes in surgical treatment of heart diseases such as ischemic, valvular, structural and congenital heart diseases. He has been trained at Harvard University and Columbia University Hospitals. Dr. Gerrah has been involved in multiple medical research projects and has patented and developed innovative surgical devices and technologies.

  • Frank Hanley

    Frank Hanley

    Lawrence Crowley, M.D., Endowed Professor in Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests His research and clinical work focuses on the development of interventional techniques for fetal and neonatal treatment of congenital heart disease, pulmonary, vascular physiology, and the neurologic impact of open-heart surgery. He developed and pioneered the “unifocalization” procedure, in which a single procedure is used to repair a complex and life-threatening congenital heart defect rather than several staged open-heart surgeries as performed by other surgeons.

  • William Hiesinger

    William Hiesinger

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. William Hiesinger is an assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University. There, he serves as the Surgical Director of the Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) Program, where he leads and directs the surgical implantation of ventricular assist devices (VADs) in patients with end-stage heart failure. In addition, he runs a basic science laboratory investigating bioengineered devices and the application of angiogenic cytokine therapy and tissue engineering for the treatment of ischemic heart failure. Originally from Philadelphia, PA, Dr. Hiesinger was an undergraduate at Dartmouth College, where he received his B.A. in Psychological and Brain Sciences. He went on to receive his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and remained on at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for both his general surgery and cardiothoracic surgery trainings. He has received research fundings from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Thoracic Surgery Foundation (TSF).

  • Ngan F. Huang

    Ngan F. Huang

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Cardiothoracic Surgery Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Huang's laboratory aims to understand the chemical and mechanical interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and pluripotent stem cells that regulate vascular and myogenic differentiation. The fundamental insights of cell-matrix interactions are applied towards stem cell-based therapies with respect to improving cell survival and regenerative capacity, as well as engineered vascularized tissues for therapeutic transplantation.

  • Ioannis Karakikes

    Ioannis Karakikes

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Karakikes Lab aims to uncover fundamental new insights into the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of pathogenic mutations associated with familial cardiovascular diseases.

  • Saverio La Francesca

    Saverio La Francesca

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Clinical Focus
    -Heart Transplantation.
    -Lung Transplantation
    -Organ Perfusion and Preservation.
    -Regenerative Medicine

    Academic Appointments
    -Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery. Current
    -Asst. Professor of Surgery. Ohio State University. Wexner Medical Center. Columbus-Ohio. 2019 ? 2020
    -Staff - Department of Cardiovascular Surgery DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center. Houston, Texas. 2010-2013
    -Attending Surgeon - Department of Cardiopulmonary Transplantation. Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke?s Episcopal Hospital. Houston, Texas. 2018- 2010

    Industry Experience
    -President and Chief Medical Officer, Mar 2017 to Oct 2017 Biostage, Inc. (NASDAQ: BSTG)
    -Executive Vice-President and Chief Medical Officer, Aug 2015 to Mar 2017 Biostage, Inc. (NASDAQ: BSTG)
    -Chief Medical Officer, Apr 2014 to Jul 2015 Biostage, Inc. (NASDAQ: BSTG) (formerly Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology,

  • Anson Lee

    Anson Lee

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Anson Lee specializes in the surgical treatment of all heart diseases, including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, aortic disease, and arrhythmias. He has practiced cardiothoracic surgery at Stanford since 2015. Dr. Lee has a special interest in the surgical treatment of abnormal heart rhythms and minimally invasive techniques to treat heart disease.

  • Douglas Liou

    Douglas Liou

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Liou is a local product, having grown up in Salinas and graduated from U.C. Berkley with a degree in Molecular and Cell Biology. He received his M.D. from New York Medical College and completed his General Surgery training at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. At Cedars, he was recognized for his excellence in clinical care and research with numerous awards and publications. Dr. Liou recently completed his 2 years of Thoracic Surgery training at Stanford, during which time he proved to be an outstanding physician and surgeon and a dedicated clinical researcher.

    Dr. Liou?s expertise includes all surgical diseases of the lung, mediastinum, esophagus, chest wall, and diaphragm, with particular interest in thoracic oncology and minimally invasive surgical techniques. He has extensive experience with minimally invasive and open management of lung and esophageal cancer, mediastinal tumors, and benign esophageal disease. Dr. Liou's primary research focus has been on clinical outcomes in thoracic oncology and quality improvement.

    Dr. Liou practices out of Stanford Hospital main campus and Stanford Health Care-ValleyCare Hospital in Pleasanton, where he is starting Stanford's Thoracic Surgery program in the East Bay.

  • James Longoria, MD

    James Longoria, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Bio Dr. Longoria is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiothoracic surgeon. He is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Deeply accomplished in all facets of complex adult cardiothoracic procedures, Dr. Longoria is a high-volume surgeon with more than 20 years of experience and an exceptionally low mortality and complication rate.

    Dr. Longoria?s surgical experience includes complex mitral valve and tricuspid valve repair, coronary artery bypass grafting, adult congenital repair, as well as procedures for high risk VAD patients. He performs cardiac transplantation, carotid endarterectomy, and implantation of all FDA-approved mechanical circulatory support devices. Additionally, he performs catheter-based valvular procedures (such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR) and open and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for pulmonary surgical procedures.

    He has an applied interest in atrial fibrillation (AFib) and is a nationally recognized expert in the minimally invasive surgical treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib). Dr. Longoria was issued a method patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for developing the TTMaze (Totally Thoracoscopic) procedure that is central to the Dual Epicardial Endocardial Persistent (DEEP) AFib clinical trial. Dr. Longoria is a principal investigator of the DEEP Trial and of the Terminate AF Study of surgical ablation devices.

    Before joining Stanford, Dr. Longoria was the surgical director of cardiac ablation at a prominent AFib center certified by the Society of Chest Pain Centers. He holds patents for a synthetic chord used to connect tissue and for specialized methods he developed to treat
    cardiac arrhythmias.

    At Stanford, Dr. Longoria brings a commitment to patientcentric, personalized care. He is committed to making the experience of surgery as pleasant as possible for his patients. He is also excited for the opportunity to conduct translational research that utilizes the most advanced technology available, in collaboration with colleagues from other disciplines.

    For his outcomes and high patient satisfaction ratings, Dr. Longoria has earned awards and recognition, including being named a Top Doctor of Sacramento by his peers for the last four years in a row. He has also been an honoree of the President?s Award for patient satisfaction by the Sutter Independent Physicians.

    Dr. Longoria has published articles on genetic variants associated with atrial fibrillation, thoracoscopic left atrial appendage clipping, radiofrequency ablation, and other topics. His work has appeared in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, and elsewhere.

    He has made numerous presentations on atrial fibrillation surgery and other topics at conferences including the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Thoracic Surgery, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    Dr. Longoria is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and American College of Cardiology. He is a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, Western Thoracic Surgical Association, the International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery, and the Heart Rhythm Society.

  • Natalie Shaubie Lui

    Natalie Shaubie Lui

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Lui studied physics as an undergraduate at Harvard before attending medical school at Johns Hopkins. She completed a general surgery residency at the University of California San Francisco, which included two years of research in the UCSF Thoracic Oncology Laboratory and completion of a Master in Advanced Studies in clinical research. Dr. Lui went on to hold a fellowship in Thoracic Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, during which she participated in visiting rotations at Memorial Sloan Kettering and the Mayo Clinic.

    Dr. Lui specializes in minimally invasive thoracic surgery, including robotic thoracic surgery. Her clinical focus extends to all aspects of general thoracic surgical diseases, including lung and esophageal cancer and airway diseases such as tracheomalacia. Her research focus is clinical and translational, including intraoperative fluorescence imaging. She is happy to be back in California and enjoys the warm weather, good food, and beautiful outdoors.

  • Michael Ma

    Michael Ma

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab aims to understand the biomechanics that govern a wide spectrum of congenital heart defects, and how those biomechanics change with contemporary operative repair strategies. We simulate operations virtually via CFD, and in ex vivo and in vivo animal models, and analyze how the changes we make alter fluid flow, pressure, and stresses throughout the system. We hope that these experiments can impact and optimize existing techniques that translate quickly to the operating room.

  • Richard D. Mainwaring

    Richard D. Mainwaring

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Professional Interests: Pediatric cardiovascular surgery, surgery for adults with congenital heart disease

  • D. Craig Miller, M.D.

    D. Craig Miller, M.D.

    Thelma and Henry Doelger Professor in Cardiovascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiac and heart valve disease with experimental laboratory large animal projects focused on the investigation of left ventricular and cardiac mechanics, bioenergetics, and LV and mitral valve physiology and pathophysiology. Current thrust is aimed at understanding the mitral valve and subvalvular mitral apparatus and transmural LV wall strains, thickening, and myolaminar fiber-sheet mechanics.

    Clinical research interests include thoracic aortic diseases (aortic dissection, aneurysm) and cardiac valvular disease, including surgical treatment, endovascular thoracic aortic stent-graft repair, mitral valve repair, and valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

  • R. Scott Mitchell

    R. Scott Mitchell

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests: Disease of the aorta, congenital and acquired. Treatment of aortic pathology, including development of stent graft systems. Patterns of disease in patients treated with mediastinal radiation. Valvular heart disease, especially aortopathy associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve.

  • Randall Morris

    Randall Morris

    Professor (Research) of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Discovery, preclinical and clinical development of novel immunosuppressive molecules for prevention or treatment of immune or inflammatory or ischemic injury to cell and organ transplants and for suppression of autoimmune diseases and acute organ injuries including small molecule, monoclonal and biologic classes of therapeutics.

  • Philip Oyer

    Philip Oyer

    Roy B. Cohn-Theodore A. Falasco Professor in Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development of an artificial heart assist device; heart, and heart-lung transplantation.

  • Ed Petrossian

    Ed Petrossian

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Petrossian has expertise in complex pediatric and congenital cardiovascular surgical repairs. He has published several journal articles and book chapters with an emphasis on the extracardiac conduit Fontan operation.

  • Olaf Reinhartz

    Olaf Reinhartz

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Mechanical circulatory support in failing Fontan circulation
    2. Pathophysiologic response to fetal cardiac surgery.
    3. Various clinical projects in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery

  • Bruce A Reitz

    Bruce A Reitz

    Norman E. Shumway Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanism of allograft rejection for the heart and, lung; late chronic effects of rejection, such as graft coronary, atherosclerosis in the heart and bronchiolitis obliterans in the, lung; treatment of rejection, including pharmacologic agents, total, lymphoid irradiation, and the induction of tolerance in fetal, animals; clinical studies include the results of lung and heart-lung, transplantation, modification of immunosuppressive protocols, and, factors contributing to late chronic rejection.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In clinical research, Dr. Shrager has been an innovator studying outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    In the lab, Dr. Shrager is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Edward Stinson

    Edward Stinson

    Thelma and Henry Doegler Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery, Emeritus

    Bio Hire date July 1, 1969. Retirement and conferment of Emeritus Professor status September 1, 1998.

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