School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 33 Results

  • Christopher Lee-Messer, MD, PhD

    Christopher Lee-Messer, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My chief clinical focus is in pediatric epilepsy, especially how epilepsy affects learning and development. For my research, I background in neural development and computational neuroscience towards developing better learning algorithms and applying the latest techniques in machine learning for better diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  • Gordon Li, MD

    Gordon Li, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1.) My laboratory studies the biology of brain tumors with the goal of developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of malignant brain tumors and translating that research into clinical trials.
    2.) My clinical interests include improving surgical techniques for brain tumor surgery, immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma, and novel uses for stereotactic radiosurgery.

  • Yi Li, MD, PhD

    Yi Li, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Li is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in epilepsy care and research. She has dedicated her career to advancing our understanding of the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of epilepsy. In addition to her MD degree, she holds a PhD degree in neurology and neuroscience. She undertook PhD training to better understand epileptogenesis and to identify potential new treatments for refractory epilepsy patients.

    Dr. Li has conducted extensive research on the mechanism of epileptogenesis via a hippocampal neural stem cell pathway and on the dynamic changes of microRNA, genes, and proteins in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Funding from the National Institutes of Health enabled her to explore the genetic influence of women with epilepsy on their children?s cognitive outcomes. Participation in the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate program helped advance her knowledge of how genomic data can enhance patient management in clinical practice.

    Dr. Li has presented the findings of many aspects of her epilepsy research at meetings of the American Epilepsy Society, American Clinical Neurophysiology Society, American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, and International Conference on Function (Psychogenic) Neurological Disorders.

    She has published numerous articles on a wide range of epilepsy-related topics, including precision medicine in women with epilepsy, pregnancy outcomes of refractory epilepsy patients, and differentiation of epileptic from non-epileptic seizures. Her work has appeared in Neurology Clinical Practice, the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease, International Journal of Molecular Medicine, Epilepsia, Journal of Neuroscience and Neurological Disorders, and elsewhere.

    Among her honors, Dr. Li has earned recognition from the American Epilepsy Society and International League Against Epilepsy. She also won a safety and quality awards scholarship from the American Academy of Neurology. She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society.

  • Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ischemic optic neuropathy
    Stem cell transplantation
    Optic neuropathy
    Optic neuritis
    Eye movement disorders
    Reading
    Parkinson's disease
    Multiple sclerosis

  • Kathie S Lin

    Kathie S Lin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Bio Dr. Lin practices both Neuromuscular Medicine and Comprehensive Neurology in Emeryville and Palo Alto. She has a particular interest in the diagnosis and management of neuromuscular disease including neuromuscular junction disorders, motor neuron disease, and focal neuropathy. Additionally, she is interested in medical education and developing a practical framework for teaching neurology and neurophysiology to medical students and neurology residents.

    She earned her medical degree at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where was awarded a Dean's Scholarship and the Dr. Tryphena Humphrey Student Award in Neurology. She completed neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston where she served as an administrative chief resident in her final year and was awarded the Michael Ronthal Resident Teaching Award. She then went on to complete her neuromuscular medicine fellowship at Stanford.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: