Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Cancer > Cutaneous (Dermatologic) Oncology
  • lymphoma/melanoma/cutaneouslymphoma
  • Medical Oncology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2000) CA
  • Residency:University of Michigan (1997) MI
  • Internship:University of Michigan Hospital (1995) MI
  • Medical Education:UCI College of Medicine (1994) CA

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Pilot Study of Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN-35) in Patients With MF With Variable CD30 Expression Level Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to learn the effects of an investigational medication, SGN 35, on patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), specifically mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary syndrome (SS). Despite a wide range of therapeutic options, the treatments are associated with short response duration, thus this condition is largely incurable. This investigational drug may offer less toxicity than standard treatments and have better tumor specific targeting. The primary objective is to explore the biologic activity of brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the most common types of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), where expression of CD30 is variable. SGN-35 has significant biologic activity in Hodgkin's disease (HD) where only a small numbers of CD30 positive tumor cells are present, as well as in lymphomas with large numbers of CD30-expressing tumor cells such as systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (sALCL). This phase II exploratory study will evaluate the clinical response of brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) in MF and SS where tumor cells express variable levels of CD30 target molecule. The grouping by CD30 expression levels (low, intermediate, high) is for accrual purposes only to ensure a wide range of CD30 expression. Given the exploratory nature of this study, it will be open-label, single-arm, and non-randomized trial. One centers will be involved to complete the accrual, a total of 24 patients with MF and SS. Enrollment will be based on CD30 expression levels by tissue immunohistochemistry (IHC), defined as low, intermediate or high expressers. The investigators will target 8 patients in each group for total of 24 patients. Of these 8 patients per group, up to 3 may be patients with SS. Each patient regardless of CD30 expression level will receive 1.8 mg/kg of SGN-35 IV every 21 days, up to 8 cycles of therapy. Patients with CR may receive 2 additional cycles. Patients who have PR may receive up to a maximum of 16 doses IF they are continuing to improve after 8 cycles. Patients who relapse within 6 months after CR maybe eligible for retreatment.

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  • Pralatrexate and Bexarotene in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This study is designed to determine the recommended dose, safety, pharmacokinetics, and early efficacy of the combination of pralatrexate plus oral bexarotene in patients with relapsed or refractory CTCL.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cutaneous Lymphoma Coordinator, (650) 421 - 6370.

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  • Study of Oral LBH589 in Adult Patients With Refractory/Resistant Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of LBH589B in adult patients with refractory/resistant Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma and prior HDAC inhibitor therapy.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Natalie Viakhireva, (650) 723 - 8949.

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  • Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Mucosal Melanoma, Acral Melanoma, or Vulvovaginal Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery Recruiting

    RATIONALE: Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well dasatinib works in treating patients with locally advanced or metastatic mucosal melanoma or acral melanoma.

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  • Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome Not Recruiting

    RATIONALE: Lenalidomide may stop the growth of mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome by blocking blood flow to the cancer. PURPOSE: This phase II trial is studying how well lenalidomide works in treating patients with relapsed mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Natalie Viakhireva, (650) 723 - 8949.

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  • Ipilimumab or High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b in Treating Patients With High-Risk Stage III-IV Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial studies ipilimumab to see how well it works compared to high-dose interferon alfa-2b in treating patients with high-risk stage III-IV melanoma that has been removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Interferon alfa-2b may interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow the growth of melanoma and other cancers. It is not yet known whether ipilimumab is more effective than interferon alfa-2b in treating patients with melanoma.

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  • Ipilimumab With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase II trial is studying how well giving ipilimumab with or without sargramostim works in treating patients with stage III or stage IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim (GM-CSF), may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of treatment. It is not yet know whether giving ipilimumab together with GM-CSF is more effective than ipilimumab alone in treating melanoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Vani Jain, (650) 725 - 5459.

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  • A Study of Bevacizumab With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Chemotherapy for the First-Line Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Melanoma Not Recruiting

    This Phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to estimate the efficacy and characterize the safety of bevacizumab when combined with carboplatin + paclitaxel chemotherapy compared with carboplatin + paclitaxel chemotherapy alone in patients with previously untreated metastatic melanoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Sunil Arani Reddy, (650) 736 - 1234.

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  • Safety Study to Evaluate Monoclonal Antibody KW-0761 in Subjects With Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This study will determine the maximum dose of KW-0761 administered intravenously that can be given safely in subjects with previously treated peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) or cutaneous T-cell lymphoma(CTCL)and will see if it is effective in treating the disease.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Katie Turner, (650) 725 - 1202.

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  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Stage III or Stage IV Melanoma Not Recruiting

    This randomized phase III trial is studying carboplatin, paclitaxel, and sorafenib to see how well they work compared to carboplatin and paclitaxel in treating patients with unresectable stage III or stage IV melanoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Sorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether giving carboplatin and paclitaxel together with sorafenib is more effective than carboplatin and paclitaxel in treating melanoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Sunil Reddy, (650) 736 - 1234.

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  • Compassionate Use Trial for Unresectable Melanoma With Ipilimumab Not Recruiting

    The primary objective of the study is to provide treatment with Ipilimumab to subjects who have serious or immediately life-threatening unresectable Stage III or Stage IV melanoma, who have no alternative treatment options, and whose physicians believe, based upon available data on benefit and risk, that it is appropriate to administer Ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg/kg induction (with re-induction, if eligible), or for eligible subjects previously enrolled in Ipilimumab studies CA184-042, CA184-078, CA184-087, MDX010-16, or MDX010-20.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Sunil Arani Reddy, (650) 736 - 1234.

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  • High-Dose Interferon Alfa in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Melanoma Not Recruiting

    RATIONALE: Interferon alfa may interfere with the growth of cancer cells. It is not yet known whether treatment with interferon alfa is more effective than observation alone for stage II or stage III melanoma that has been completely removed surgically. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying high dose interferon alfa to see how well it works compared to observation only in treating patients with stage II or stage III melanoma that has been completely removed by surgery.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Sunil Arani Reddy, (650) 736 - 1234.

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  • Low-dose (12 Gy) TSEBT+Vorinostat Versus Low-dose TSEBT Monotherapy in Mycosis Fungoides Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to determine if vorinostat combined with low-dose total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) offers superior clinical benefit (efficacy & safety) over low-dose TSEBT alone.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cutaneous Lymphoma Coordinator, 650-421-6370.

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  • A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of RO5185426 in Previously Treated Patients With Metastatic Melanoma Not Recruiting

    This open-label study will assess the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of RO5185426 administered as 240mg tablets in previously treated patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients will be randomized to receive one of four dose-levels of RO5185426 [RG7204; PLEXXIKON; PLX4032] orally twice daily on days 1 to 15 (morning dose). Starting on day 22, treatment with RO5185426 may be resumed at a dose of 960 mg twice daily and continued until disease progression. Target sample size is <100 patients.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Dana Supan, (650) 736 - 1684.

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  • Pilot Ipilimumab in Stage IV Melanoma Receiving Palliative Radiation Therapy Recruiting

    This is a single institution, open-label, pilot study of palliative radiation therapy (RT) combined with ipilimumab in patients with stage IV melanoma. The primary objective of this study is to assess the safety of combining ipilimumab with palliative RT in patients with Stage IV melanoma. Secondary objectives are a) to assess the induction of anti-melanoma immune responses using laboratory correlative studies of T cell responses to melanoma antigens, and b) to compare tumor response rates and duration of response at unirradiated sites with responses in patients with Stage IV disease treated with ipilimumab alone on expanded access study CA184045. In this study, ipilimumab will be administered as recently approved by the FDA (3 mg/kg iv every 3 weeks for a total of 4 treatments). Palliative RT will start within 2 days of the first ipilimumab dose. Patients will be seen at least every 12 weeks for follow-up following completion of ipilimumab therapy until progression of disease by imaging criteria or increased symptomatology that requires another therapy. A total of 20 patients with previously treated unresectable metastatic melanoma requiring palliative radiation therapy will be treated on this pilot study over approximately 18 months. All subjects who receive study drug will be monitored for safety. Relevant tumor imaging studies will be obtained at baseline, 2-4 weeks following the 4th/last dose of ipilimumab, and then every 12 weeks until disease progression. This study will provide the safety data (and possibly early efficacy signals) needed to proceed with a randomized Phase II study for proof of principle. If compelling data is obtained supporting this IT + RT vaccine strategy, this approach will be extended to other solid tumor types.

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  • Everolimus (RAD001) in Primary Therapy of Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia Not Recruiting

    The purpose of this research study is to determine the safety of RAD001(Everolimus) and the highest dose of this drug that can be given to people safely. RAD001(Everolimus) is a drug that works by preventing cells in the body from growing and dividing. Information from basic and Phase I clinical research studies suggests that RAD001 also may help to prevent tumor growth in people with relapsed or refractory lymphoma.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Sipra Choudhury, (650) 736 - 2563.

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  • Safety and Efficacy of Nitrogen Mustard in Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides Not Recruiting

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of the topical application of mechlorethamine (MCH) formulations in patients with stage I or IIA mycosis fungoides (MF).

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Natalie Viakhireva, (650) 723 - 8949.

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  • A Randomized Phase II Study of Oral Sapacitabine in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This is an open label, randomized phase II study designed to evaluate the tolerability and response rate of high-dose and low-dose regimens in patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) who have had progressive, recurrent, or persistent disease on or following 2 systemic therapies.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Daniel Navi, (650) 736 - 2300.

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  • Safety, Pharmacodynamics (PD), Pharmacokinetics (PK) Study of SHP141 in 1A, 1B, or 2A Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma (CTCL) Recruiting

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the safety and tolerability of topical SHP141 applied directly to skin lesions in patients with Stage IA, IB, or IIA Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma. This study will also investigate the effect of SHP141 on skin lesions in patients with Stage IA, IB, or IIA CTCL.

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  • A Study of CDX-1127 in Patients With Select Solid Tumor Types or Hematologic Cancers Recruiting

    This is a study of CDX-1127, a therapy that targets the immune system and may act to promote anti-cancer effects. The study enrolls patients with hematologic cancers (certain leukemias and lymphomas), as well as patients with select types of solid tumors.

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  • A Study of Pharmacokinetic Drug Interaction Study of the Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor GDC-0449 in Combination With Rosiglitazone or Combined Oral Contraceptive in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Are Refractory to Standard Therapy or for Whom No Standard Therapy Exists Not Recruiting

    This is a single-arm, multicenter, Phase Ib study designed to describe the effect of GDC-0449 on the pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone and oral contraceptives in patients with advanced solid tumors who are refractory to treatment or for whom no standard therapy exists.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Ruth Lira, (650) 723 - 1367.

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  • Study of Pralatrexate in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This study is being conducted to identify how much and how often pralatrexate, given with vitamin B12 and folic acid, can be given safely to patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) that has relapsed (returned after responding to previous treatment) or is refractory (has not responded to previous treatment). It is also being conducted to get information on whether or not pralatrexate is effective in treating relapsed or refractory CTCL.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cameron Harrison, (650) 721 - 7186.

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  • Forodesine in the Treatment of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    This is a Phase II, non-randomized, open-label, single-arm trial that will be conducted at up to 50 sites in North America, Europe and Australia. This study is designed to assess objective response (OR) [complete response (CR) or partial response (PR)] in subjects with cutaneous manifestations of CTCL with a requirement for maintenance of such objective response for at least 28 days in subjects with stage IIB, III, and IVA CTCL. Additionally, this study will evaluate the safety and tolerability of CTCL subjects Stages IB, IIA, IIB, III, or IVA treated with oral forodesine.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Natalie Viakhireva, (650) 723 - 8949.

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  • Extension Study in Subjects Who Relapsed After Complete Response on Study KW-0761-001 Not Recruiting

    This study will enroll subjects with either Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma (PTCL) or Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma(CTCL),including mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS), who have relapsed after achieving a complete response in study, KW-0761-001.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Cutaneous Lymphoma Coordinator, (650) 421 - 6370.

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  • An Open Label Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Mechlorethamine(MCH) 0.04% Formulation in Mycosis Fungoides Not Recruiting

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical application of MCH 0.04% in a propylene glycol ointment (PG)in patients with stage I or IIA MF previously treated with MCH 0.02% in a PG or AP ointment who did not achieve a complete response.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Kokil Bakshi, (650) 421 - 6370.

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  • A Study for Patients With Relapsed Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Not Recruiting

    The purpose of the study is to determine the efficacy and safety of enzastaurin in patients with CTCL who failed prior therapies.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact Natalie Viakhireva, (650) 723 - 8949.

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Publications

Journal Articles


  • A Phase II Study of SGN-30 in Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Related Lymphoproliferative Disorders CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH Duvic, M., Reddy, S. A., Pinter-Brown, L., Korman, N. J., Zic, J., Kennedy, D. A., Lorenz, J., Sievers, E. L., Kim, Y. H. 2009; 15 (19): 6217-6224

    Abstract

    An open-label, multicenter, phase II study was conducted to define the safety and antitumor activity of the monoclonal antibody SGN-30 in patients with CD30(+) primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pc-ALCL), lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), or transformed mycosis fungoides (T-MF).In the initial course (six doses), patients received i.v. SGN-30 every 3 weeks; eligible patients could receive two additional courses. The initial dose level of 4 mg/kg was increased to 12 mg/kg by protocol amendment.The overall objective response rate [complete response (CR) + partial response (PR)] was 70% (16 of 23 patients): 10 patients achieved a CR and another 6 patients achieved a PR. Overall, clinical benefit of SGN-30, as assessed by achieving a response to therapy or stable disease (CR + PR + stable disease), was shown by 87% of patients during the study, including all patients with pc-ALCL or LyP and two thirds of patients with T-MF or with multiple clinical diagnoses. Nine of the 10 patients who achieved a CR and 5 of the 6 patients who achieved a PR were in remission at their follow-up evaluation (median duration, 84 days). Fifteen of 23 patients (65%) experienced at least one adverse event during the study, most of which were mild or moderate.SGN-30 was clinically active in 16 of 23 patients with heavily pretreated pc-ALCL, LyP, and T-MF and was well tolerated in this study.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-0162

    View details for Web of Science ID 000270498700034

    View details for PubMedID 19789316

  • Prognostic Factors in Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Characterization of Clinical Subset With Worse Outcome ARCHIVES OF DERMATOLOGY Woo, D. K., Jones, C. R., Vanoli-Storz, M. N., Kohler, S., Reddy, S., Advani, R., Hoppe, R. T., Kim, Y. H. 2009; 145 (6): 667-674

    Abstract

    To identify prognostic factors in primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL), focusing on extensive limb disease (ELD), defined as initial presentation or progression to multiple skin tumors in 1 limb or contiguous body regions, and to study gene expression profiles of patients with pcALCL.Retrospective cohort study.The Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center and dermatology ambulatory clinics.A total of 48 patients with pcALCL evaluated from 1990 through 2005.Hazard ratios (HRs) for prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) and risk factors for progression to extracutaneous disease were identified using Cox regression. Gene expression profiles of 9 typical pcALCL and 3 ELD samples were investigated using complementary DNA microarrays.Univariate analysis demonstrated age, ELD, and progression to extracutaneous disease as significant prognostic factors for OS, whereas ELD and progression to extracutaneous disease were significant for DSS. In multivariate analysis, age (HR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-3.26) and progression to extracutaneous disease (HR, 6.42; 95% CI, 1.39-29.68) remained significant for OS, whereas ELD (HR, 29.31; 95% CI, 1.72-500.82) and progression to extracutaneous disease (HR, 13.12; 95% CI, 1.03-167.96) remained independent prognostic factors for DSS. Presentation with T3 disease was a risk factor for progression to extracutaneous disease (HR, 10.20; 95% CI, 1.84-56.72). Microarray data revealed that patients with ELD and typical pcALCL formed distinct clusters.Patients with ELD have a more aggressive course associated with a differential gene expression profile. More aggressive treatments may be indicated for patients with ELD and those whose disease progresses to extracutaneous disease because they have poorer outcomes.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000267010900006

    View details for PubMedID 19528422

  • Indolent primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: Experience using systemic rituximab JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY Morales, A. V., Advani, R., Horwitz, S. M., Riaz, N., Reddy, S., Hoppe, R. T., Kim, Y. H. 2008; 59 (6): 953-957

    Abstract

    Optimal treatment of indolent primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL), marginal zone lymphoma, and follicle center lymphoma, presenting as multiple lesions, has yet to be established. Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal IgG1 antibody directed against the CD20 antigen of B cells. Clinical efficacy of systemic rituximab in CBCL has yet to be established.We sought to assess the efficacy of systemic rituximab in the treatment of CBCL.This was a retrospective study of 15 patients with indolent CBCL treated with intravenous rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) as a single agent. Variable maintenance regimen was used in a subset of patients. Responses were categorized as complete response, partial response, stable disease, or progressive disease. The efficacy end points included were objective response rate, time to response, time to progression, and duration of response.Ten patients with follicle center lymphoma and 5 with marginal zone lymphoma were included. The objective response rate was 87% (60% complete response, 27% partial response). All patients with follicle center lymphoma had a response with 80% achieving complete response. Of the patients with marginal zone lymphoma, 3 had a response, one stable disease, and one progressive disease. Median follow-up was 36 months. Median time to response, duration of response, and time to progression was 30 days, 24 months, and 24 months, respectively.The study was limited by the small sample size and retrospective design.This study, although small, suggests that rituximab is a reasonable first-line treatment option for indolent CBCL with multiple lesions where local treatment is not effective or desirable.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaad.2008.08.005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000261141600006

    View details for PubMedID 18817999

  • Plant-produced idiotype vaccines for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Safety and immunogenicity in a phase I clinical study PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA McCormick, A. A., Reddy, S., Reinl, S. J., Cameron, T. I., Czerwinkski, D. K., Vojdani, F., Hanley, K. M., Garger, S. J., White, E. L., Novak, J., Barrett, J., Holtz, R. B., Tuse, D., Levy, R. 2008; 105 (29): 10131-10136

    Abstract

    Plant-made vaccines have been the subject of intense interest because they can be produced economically in large scale without the use of animal-derived components. Plant-made therapeutic vaccines against challenging chronic diseases, such as cancer, have received little research attention, and no previous human clinical trials have been conducted in this vaccine category. We document the feasibility of using a plant viral expression system to produce personalized (patient-specific) recombinant idiotype vaccines against follicular B cell lymphoma and the results of administering these vaccines to lymphoma patients in a phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical trial. The system allowed rapid production and recovery of idiotypic single-chain antibodies (scFv) derived from each patient's tumor and immunization of patients with their own individual therapeutic antigen. Both low and high doses of vaccines, administered alone or co-administered with the adjuvant GM-CSF, were well tolerated with no serious adverse events. A majority (>70%) of the patients developed cellular or humoral immune responses, and 47% of the patients developed antigen-specific responses. Because 15 of 16 vaccines were glycosylated in plants, this study also shows that variation in patterns of antigen glycosylation do not impair the immunogenicity or affect the safety of the vaccines. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that plant-produced idiotype vaccines are feasible to produce, safe to administer, and a viable option for idiotype-specific immune therapy in follicular lymphoma patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0803636105

    View details for Web of Science ID 000257913200052

    View details for PubMedID 18645180

  • Molecular rescue of tumour-specific T cell receptor idiotype from T cell lymphomas BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY Reddy, S. A., Levy, R. 2004; 124 (5): 626-628

    Abstract

    The T cell receptor (TCR) idiotype on T cell lymphomas can serve as a vaccine target. To clone the relevant genes, 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) was performed on 13 T cell lymphomas and nine control samples. Two polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed for each TCR chain (alpha and beta) and the proportion of the clonal TCR sequence over the total number of TCR sequences was calculated. For alpha, the average proportions were 0.43 vs. 0.05. For beta these were 0.44 and 0.04. The TCR was identified in 10 of 13 lymphoma samples.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2141.2004.04830.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000189304300007

    View details for PubMedID 14871249

  • CD30(+) cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders: The Stanford experience in lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY Liu, H. L., Hoppe, R. T., Kohler, S., Harvell, J. D., Reddy, S., Kim, Y. H. 2003; 49 (6): 1049-1058

    Abstract

    CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders (CLPDs) include lymphomatoid papulosis, borderline cases of CD30+CLPDs, and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PCALCL). Prior studies have shown CD30+CLPDs have an excellent prognosis.We sought to present the single-center experience of Stanford University, Stanford, Calif, in the management of CD30+CLPDs.A retrospective cohort analysis of 56 patients with CD30+CLPDs treated at our institution was performed.No patients with lymphomatoid papulosis died of disease, and overall survival was 92% at 5 and 10 years. Disease-specific survivals at 5 and 10 years for PCALCL were 85%. Disease-specific survival at 5 years for localized versus generalized PCALCL was 91% versus 50% (P =.31). PCALCL was highly responsive to treatment, but the relapse rate was 42%. In all, 3 patients progressed to extracutaneous stage of disease. No clinical or histologic factors analyzed were predictive of worse outcome in lymphomatoid papulosis and PCALCL.Similar to prior reports from multicenter European groups, the single-center experience at our institution demonstrates CD30+CLPDs have an overall excellent prognosis; however, cases of PCALCL with poor outcome do exist.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0190-9622(03)02484-8

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186784800009

    View details for PubMedID 14639383

  • Favorable treatment outcome in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients with "poor" mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells BIOLOGY OF BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Stockerl-Goldstein, K. E., Reddy, S. A., Horning, S. J., Blume, K. G., Chao, N. J., Hu, W. W., JOHNSTON, L. J., Long, G. D., Strober, S., Wong, R. M., Feiner, R. H., Kohler, S., Negrin, R. S. 2000; 6 (5): 506-512

    Abstract

    Our purpose was to evaluate the outcome and costs of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation in patients with the inability to mobilize sufficient numbers of PBPCs to allow rapid engraftment after PBPC transplantation. We treated 172 consecutive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients with cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor followed by apheresis to collect PBPCs. The cells were separated on a Percoll gradient and purged with monoclonal antibodies and complement. The patients were categorized as "good" mobilizers if a collection of > or =2 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg was obtained (n = 138, 80%) or "poor" mobilizers if <2 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were obtained (n = 34, 20%). With a median follow-up of 3.5 years, there is no statistically significant difference in actuarial event-free survival, overall survival, or relapse for good mobilizers compared with poor mobilizers. However, there was a trend toward increasing nonrelapse, transplantation-related mortality of 11.8% for poor mobilizers versus 3.6% for good mobilizers (P = .08) and early death from all causes including relapse within 120 days (poor 20.6% versus good 8.7%, P = .06). The total cost for bone marrow transplantation-related care was significantly higher, at $140,264 for poor mobilizers versus $80,833 for good mobilizers (P = .0001). The population of patients with NHL who mobilize PBPCs poorly into the circulation have a higher cost for posttransplant support. However, there is no significant difference in relapse, event-free survival, or overall survival for such patients compared with those who mobilize PBPCs easily.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000090049700004

    View details for PubMedID 11063379

Conference Proceedings


  • T cell antigen receptor vaccines for active therapy of T cell malignancies Reddy, S. A., Okada, C., Wong, C., Bahler, D., Levy, R. NEW YORK ACAD SCIENCES. 2001: 97-105

    Abstract

    T cell lymphoproliferative disorders continue to be serious management problems, and so alternative therapeutic modalities are continuously being explored. One such strategy involves immunotherapy using the T cell receptor (TCR) as a target. Specifically we are attempting to develop a T cell receptor idiotype (TCR-Id) vaccine because the TCR-Id can serve as a tumor-specific antigen. In this article we will briefly review the rationale for TCR-Id vaccines, the preclinical models as developed in our laboratory, and a discussion of our current plans for a vaccine trial in mycosis fungoides.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000172619000010

    View details for PubMedID 11594586

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