Bio

Bio


My goal in research is to understand the interaction between environmental change and biological evolution using fossils and the sedimentary rock record. How does environmental change influence evolutionary and ecological processes? And conversely, how do evolutionary and ecological changes affect the physical environment? I am focused primarily on finding answers to these questions on two timescales: 1) the timescale of catastrophic extinction events and their immediate aftermaths (up to a few million years); and 2) the timescale of geological periods and eras (tens to hundreds of millions of years). My research combines macro-scale, field-based work on the stratigraphy and paleontology of carbonate platforms with micro-scale, laboratory-based work on the petrography and geochemistry of individual limestone samples and mineral phases. In addition to field and laboratory study, I also compile literature-based data and use theoretical models to help constrain interpretation of field-based data and to determine the extent to which local biotic patterns reflect global processes.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Professor of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (2012 - Present)
  • Associate Professor of Biology (by courtesy), Stanford University (2010 - Present)
  • Affiliated Faculty Member, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University (2009 - Present)
  • Assistant Professor of Biology (by courtesy), Stanford University (2010 - 2012)
  • Assistant Professor of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University (2005 - 2012)
  • Post-doctoral Fellow, Pennsylvania State University (2005 - 2005)
  • Research Assistant, Harvard University (2002 - 2005)
  • Teaching Assistant, Harvard University (2000 - 2005)
  • Science and Mathematics Teacher, The American School in Switzerland (TASIS) (1997 - 1999)

Honors & Awards


  • VPUE Faculty Scholar, Stanford University (2013)
  • CAREER Award, NSF (2012)
  • Frederick E. Terman Fellowship, Stanford University (2007-2009)
  • Honorable mention for best paper, Palaios (2006)
  • Fellow, NDSEG Graduate Fellowship (1999 - 2002)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Co-chair, Theme Team for Goldschmidt 2014 - 'Evolution of the Earth's Environment' (2013 - Present)
  • Pre-major advisor - 4 students; Major advisor (GES) - 2 students, Stanford University (2013 - 2013)
  • Invited Speaker, University of Zurich; Syracuse University; Bodega Marine Lab, UC Davis (2013 - 2013)
  • Research mentor: 2 high school teachers, Stanford Research Experience for Teachers Program; 20 high school students; 7 undergraduate students, Stanford University (2013 - 2013)
  • Lecture for Camp for Talented Youth Geology Class (Middle School Students), Stanford University (2013 - 2013)
  • Lecture for SES Summer Program in Paleoclimate for K-12 teachers, Stanford University (2013 - 2013)
  • Outside chair for PhD Exam - 5 exams (Biology x2, CEE, Chemistry, Physics), Stanford University (2012 - 2012)
  • Major advisor (GES) - 2 students, Stanford University (2012 - 2012)
  • Invited Speaker, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University; University of California at Berkeley; Agouron Institute Meeting: The Comings and Goings of Animal Life on Earth; Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Saudi Aramco (2012 - 2012)
  • Lecture for SES VPUE and SURGE Summer Undergraduate Research Students, Stanford University (2012 - 2012)
  • Co-organizer, Paleontological Society short course at GSA Annual Meeting - 'Ecosystem Paleobiology and Geobiology' (2012 - Present)
  • Lecture for Camp for Talented Youth Geology Class (Middle School Students), Stanford University (2012 - 2012)
  • Member, Theme Team for Goldschmidt 2013 - 'Evolution of the Earth's Environment' (2012 - Present)
  • Research mentor: 2 high school teachers, Stanford Research Experience for Teachers Program; 10 high school students (7 presented posters at AGU December meeting); 5 undergraduate students (4 presented posters at AGU December meeting), Stanford University (2012 - 2012)
  • Chair, GES Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, Stanford University (2012 - Present)
  • Undergraduate Program Director, GES, Stanford University (2012 - Present)
  • Associate Editor, American Journal of Science (2011 - Present)
  • Co-chair, Geobiology Search Committee, Stanford University (2011 - Present)
  • Research mentor for 5 high school students (all 5 presented posters at AGU December meeting in San Francisco); Research mentor for 3 undergraduate students (2 funded by VPUE, 1 funded by SURGE), Stanford University (2011 - 2011)
  • Invited Speaker, Princeton University (2011 - 2011)
  • Outside chair for PhD Exam - 1 exam (EESS), Stanford University (2011 - 2011)
  • Lecture for Camp for Talented Youth Geology Class (Middle School Students), Stanford University (2011 - 2011)
  • Lecture for SES VPUE Summer Undergraduate Research Students, Stanford University (2011 - 2011)
  • Research mentor for 1 high school science teacher, Stanford Research Experience for Teachers Program, Stanford University (2011 - 2011)
  • Convener, Topical session on Carbon Isotopes and the Geological Carbon Cycle at the European Geophysical Union Annual Meeting (2011 - 2011)
  • Lecture for Camp for Talented Youth Geology Class (Middle School Students), Stanford University (2010 - 2010)
  • Lecturer for SES Summer High School Interns and Undergraduate Research Students, Stanford University (2010 - 2010)
  • Research mentor for 12 high school students (10 presented posters at AGU December meeting in San Francisco), Stanford University (2010 - 2010)
  • Research mentor for 1 high school science teacher, Stanford Research Experience for Teachers Program, Stanford University (2010 - 2010)
  • Invited Speaker, University of California at Berkeley; University of Frankfurt; University of California at Santa Cruz; Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL (2010 - 2010)
  • Convener, Topical session on Geochemistry of Extinction and Radiation Events at Goldschmidt Conference (2009 - 2009)
  • Invited Speaker, Stanford GES & Geophysics Joint Dept Seminar; San Jose State University; California Academy of Sciences; University of California at Santa Barbara; University of New Mexico (2009 - 2009)
  • Lecturer, SES VPUE Summer Undergraduate Research Students and High School Interns, Stanford University (2009 - 2009)
  • Member, Earth Sciences Council, Stanford University (2009 - Present)
  • Research mentor for 2 high school students (both presented posters at AGU December meeting in San Francisco), Stanford University (2009 - 2009)
  • Outside chair for PhD Exam - 2 exams (Biology), Stanford University (2009 - 2009)
  • Lecturer and mentor, SES VPUE Summer Undergraduate Research Students (2008 - 2008)
  • Invited Speaker, MIT; Stanford School of Earth Sciences Faculty Forum; Chevron-Texaco, San Ramon, CA; Harvard University; NASA Ames Research Center; UC Santa Cruz (2008 - 2008)
  • Member, SES Educational Outreach Committee, Stanford University (2008 - Present)
  • SES Librarian Search Committee, Stanford University (2008 - 2009)
  • Invited Speaker, California Academy of Sciences; Guizhou Geological Survey, Guiyang, China; University of California at Berkeley; University of California at Davis; Williams College (2007 - 2007)
  • Convener, Topical Session on Extinction Selectivity at GSA Annual Meeting (2007 - 2007)
  • Outside chair for PhD Exam - 4 exams (Biological Sciences), Stanford University (2007 - 2007)
  • Associate Editor, Newsletter on Stratigraphy (2007 - Present)
  • GES Long Range Planning Committee, Stanford University (2007 - 2010)
  • Member, University Human Skeletal Remains Oversight Committee, Stanford University (2007 - Present)
  • Lecturer and mentor, SES Summer High School Interns (2007 - 2007)
  • GES TA Training Coordinator, Stanford Univesity (2007 - Present)
  • GES Dept Seminar Coordinator, Stanford University (2007 - 2009)
  • Invited Speaker, San Jose State University; Chevron-Texaco, San Ramon, CA; University of Chicago; Northwestern University (2006 - 2006)
  • Associate Editor, Palaeontologia Electronica (2006 - Present)
  • Lecture for SES VPUE Summer Undergraduate Research Students, Stanford University (2006 - 2006)
  • Member, GES Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, Stanford University (2006 - 2012)
  • Member, Earth Systems Committee of the Whole, Stanford University (2006 - Present)
  • Lecture for SES Summer High School Interns, Stanford University (2006 - 2006)
  • Judge, SES Annual Research Review (2006 - 2008)
  • Proposal Reviewer, NSF (Sedimentary Geology and Paleobiology; Geobiology and Low Temperature Geochemistry; Antaractic Earth Sciences) , NASA Astrobiology, Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society, Swiss National Science Foundation, Austrian Science Fund, National Geographic Society, Lewis and Clark Foundation, Paleontological Society (Student Grants), US Civilian Research and Development Foundation (2005 - Present)
  • Invited Speaker, Peninsula Geological Society, Stanford, CA; Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey; Pennsylvania State University; Stanford University; University of Connecticut; University of Michigan (2005 - 2005)
  • Manuscript Reviewer, Science, PNAS, Geology, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Geobiology, Paleobiology, Environmental Science, American Journal of Science, Journal of Paleontology, Global and Planetary Change, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Geological Society of America Bulletin, Palaeoworld, New Mexico Museum of Natural History Bulletin, Palaios, Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology, Sedimentology, Lithos, Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, Gondwana Research, Nature Geoscience (2004 - Present)
  • Invited Speaker, University of Kyushu, Japan; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Hermosillo (2004 - 2004)
  • Invited Speaker, University of Kansas (2003 - 2003)
  • Invited Speaker, Guizhou Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, China (2002 - 2002)

Professional Education


  • Ph.D., Harvard University, Earth and Planetary Sciences (2005)
  • A.M., Harvard University, Earth and Planetary Sciences (2002)
  • B.A., Williams College, Geosciences (1997)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Research
My research group studies the relationship between environmental change and biological evolution in the fossil record. The primary focus of my research group is on understanding the causes of mass extinctions and the processes that control subsequent recovery of biodiversity and global ecosystems. We are working to constrain the causes of the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions using high-resolution sedimentary, geochemical, and paleontological records developed from carbonate platform sediments in China, Italy, Turkey, and Japan. We are also using global data on fossil occurrence patterns and body sizes to study longer-term connections between environmental change and biological evolution, with a focus on extinction selectivity and body size evolution.

Teaching
I teach courses for undergraduates in historical geology and invertebrate paleobiology and courses for graduate students in carbonate sedimentology, geobiology, and paleobiology.

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Graduate and Fellowship Programs


  • Biology (School of Humanities and Sciences) (Phd Program)

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Long-term differences in extinction risk among the seven forms of rarity PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Harnik, P. G., Simpson, C., Payne, J. L. 2012; 279 (1749): 4969-4976

    Abstract

    Rarity is widely used to predict the vulnerability of species to extinction. Species can be rare in markedly different ways, but the relative impacts of these different forms of rarity on extinction risk are poorly known and cannot be determined through observations of species that are not yet extinct. The fossil record provides a valuable archive with which we can directly determine which aspects of rarity lead to the greatest risk. Previous palaeontological analyses confirm that rarity is associated with extinction risk, but the relative contributions of different types of rarity to extinction risk remain unknown because their impacts have never been examined simultaneously. Here, we analyse a global database of fossil marine animals spanning the past 500 million years, examining differential extinction with respect to multiple rarity types within each geological stage. We observe systematic differences in extinction risk over time among marine genera classified according to their rarity. Geographic range played a primary role in determining extinction, and habitat breadth a secondary role, whereas local abundance had little effect. These results suggest that current reductions in geographic range size will lead to pronounced increases in long-term extinction risk even if local populations are relatively large at present.

    View details for DOI 10.1098/rspb.2012.1902

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310999000015

    View details for PubMedID 23097507

  • LATE PALEOZOIC FUSULINOIDEAN GIGANTISM DRIVEN BY ATMOSPHERIC HYPEROXIA EVOLUTION Payne, J. L., Groves, J. R., Jost, A. B., Thienan Nguyen, T., Moffitt, S. E., Hill, T. M., Skotheim, J. M. 2012; 66 (9): 2929-2939

    Abstract

    Atmospheric hyperoxia, with pO(2) in excess of 30%, has long been hypothesized to account for late Paleozoic (360-250 million years ago) gigantism in numerous higher taxa. However, this hypothesis has not been evaluated statistically because comprehensive size data have not been compiled previously at sufficient temporal resolution to permit quantitative analysis. In this study, we test the hyperoxia-gigantism hypothesis by examining the fossil record of fusulinoidean foraminifers, a dramatic example of protistan gigantism with some individuals exceeding 10 cm in length and exceeding their relatives by six orders of magnitude in biovolume. We assembled and examined comprehensive regional and global, species-level datasets containing 270 and 1823 species, respectively. A statistical model of size evolution forced by atmospheric pO(2) is conclusively favored over alternative models based on random walks or a constant tendency toward size increase. Moreover, the ratios of volume to surface area in the largest fusulinoideans are consistent in magnitude and trend with a mathematical model based on oxygen transport limitation. We further validate the hyperoxia-gigantism model through an examination of modern foraminiferal species living along a measured gradient in oxygen concentration. These findings provide the first quantitative confirmation of a direct connection between Paleozoic gigantism and atmospheric hyperoxia.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01626.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000308405100020

    View details for PubMedID 22946813

  • Evidence for end-Permian ocean acidification from calcium isotopes in biogenic apatite GEOLOGY Hinojosa, J. L., Brown, S. T., Chen, J., DePaolo, D. J., Paytan, A., Shen, S., Payne, J. L. 2012; 40 (8): 743-746

    View details for DOI 10.1130/G33048.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000307093100018

  • Two-phase increase in the maximum size of life over 3.5 billion years reflects biological innovation and environmental opportunity PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Payne, J. L., Boyer, A. G., Brown, J. H., Finnegan, S., Kowalewski, M., Krause, R. A., Lyons, S. K., McClain, C. R., McShea, D. W., Novack-Gottshall, P. M., Smith, F. A., Stempien, J. A., Wang, S. C. 2009; 106 (1): 24-27

    Abstract

    The maximum size of organisms has increased enormously since the initial appearance of life >3.5 billion years ago (Gya), but the pattern and timing of this size increase is poorly known. Consequently, controls underlying the size spectrum of the global biota have been difficult to evaluate. Our period-level compilation of the largest known fossil organisms demonstrates that maximum size increased by 16 orders of magnitude since life first appeared in the fossil record. The great majority of the increase is accounted for by 2 discrete steps of approximately equal magnitude: the first in the middle of the Paleoproterozoic Era (approximately 1.9 Gya) and the second during the late Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic eras (0.6-0.45 Gya). Each size step required a major innovation in organismal complexity--first the eukaryotic cell and later eukaryotic multicellularity. These size steps coincide with, or slightly postdate, increases in the concentration of atmospheric oxygen, suggesting latent evolutionary potential was realized soon after environmental limitations were removed.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0806314106

    View details for Web of Science ID 000262263900008

    View details for PubMedID 19106296

  • (submitted) Constraining the cause of the end-Guadalupian extinction with coupled records of carbon and calcium isotopes Earth and Planetary Science Letters Jost, A. B., Mundil, R., He, B., Brown, S. T., Altiner, D., Sun, Y., DePaolo, D. J., Payne, J. L. 2014
  • CONSTRAINTS ON THE ADULT-OFFSPRING SIZE RELATIONSHIP IN PROTISTS EVOLUTION Caval-Holme, F., Payne, J., Skotheim, J. M. 2013; 67 (12): 3537-3544

    Abstract

    The relationship between adult and offspring size is an important aspect of reproductive strategy. Although this filial relationship has been extensively examined in plants and animals, we currently lack comparable data for protists, whose strategies may differ due to the distinct ecological and physiological constraints on single-celled organisms. Here, we report measurements of adult and offspring sizes in 3888 species and subspecies of foraminifera, a class of large marine protists. Foraminifera exhibit a wide range of reproductive strategies; species of similar adult size may have offspring whose sizes vary 100-fold. Yet, a robust pattern emerges. The minimum (5th percentile), median, and maximum (95th percentile) offspring sizes exhibit a consistent pattern of increase with adult size independent of environmental change and taxonomic variation over the past 400 million years. The consistency of this pattern may arise from evolutionary optimization of the offspring size-fecundity trade-off and/or from cell-biological constraints that limit the range of reproductive strategies available to single-celled organisms. When compared with plants and animals, foraminifera extend the evidence that offspring size covaries with adult size across an additional five orders of magnitude in organism size.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/evo.12210

    View details for Web of Science ID 000327572400013

    View details for PubMedID 24299406

  • High-resolution delta C-13(carb) chemostratigraphy from latest Guadalupian through earliest Triassic in South China and Iran EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS Shen, S., Cao, C., Zhang, H., Bowring, S. A., Henderson, C. M., Payne, J. L., Davydov, V. I., Chen, B., Yuan, D., Zhang, Y., Wang, W., Zheng, Q. 2013; 375: 156-165
  • MICROBES, MUD AND METHANE: CAUSE AND CONSEQUENCE OF RECURRENT EARLY JURASSIC ANOXIA FOLLOWING THE END-TRIASSIC MASS EXTINCTION PALAEONTOLOGY van de Schootbrugge, B., Bachan, A., Suan, G., Richoz, S., Payne, J. L. 2013; 56 (4): 685-709

    View details for DOI 10.1111/pala.12034

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321832100002

  • A SHIFT IN THE LONG-TERM MODE OF FORAMINIFERAN SIZE EVOLUTION CAUSED BY THE END-PERMIAN MASS EXTINCTION EVOLUTION Payne, J. L., Jost, A. B., Wang, S. C., Skotheim, J. M. 2013; 67 (3): 816-827

    Abstract

    Size is among the most important traits of any organism, yet the factors that control its evolution remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate controls on the evolution of organismal size using a newly compiled database of nearly 25,000 foraminiferan species and subspecies spanning the past 400 million years. We find a transition in the pattern of foraminiferan size evolution from correlation with atmospheric pO2 during the Paleozoic (400-250 million years ago) to long-term stasis during the post-Paleozoic (250 million years ago to present). Thus, a dramatic shift in the evolutionary mode coincides with the most severe biotic catastrophe of the Phanerozoic (543 million years ago to present). Paleozoic tracking of pO2 was confined to Order Fusulinida, whereas Paleozoic lagenides, miliolids, and textulariids were best described by the stasis model. Stasis continued to best describe miliolids and textulariids during post-Paleozoic time, whereas random walk was the best supported mode for the other diverse orders. The shift in evolutionary dynamics thus appears to have resulted primarily from the selective elimination of fusulinids at the end of the Permian Period. These findings illustrate the potential for mass extinction to alter macroevolutionary dynamics for hundreds of millions of years.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01807.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315894800018

    View details for PubMedID 23461330

  • No consistent relationship between body size and extinction risk in the marine fossil record Nature Geoscience Finnegan, S., Wang, S. C., Alroy, J., Boyer, A. G., Clapham, M. E., Finkel, Z. V., Kosnik, M. A., Kowalewski, M., Krause, R. A., Lyons, S. K., McClain, C. R., McShea, D. W., Novack-Gottshall, P. M., Lockwood, R., Payne, J. L., Smith, F. A., Spaeth, P. A., Stempien, J. A. 2013
  • Constraints on Early Triassic carbon cycle dynamics from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope records EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS Meyer, K. M., Yu, M., LEHRMANN, D., van de Schootbrugge, B., Payne, J. L. 2013; 361: 429-435
  • The Early and Middle Triassic platform margin and reef architecture of the Great Bank of Guizhou--evidence from satellite image analysis, field-based investigation, and carbon isotope stratigraphy Journal of Sedimentary Research Kelley, B. M., Yu, M., Lehrmann, D. J., Jost, A. B., Meyer, K. M., Payne, J. L. 2013
  • Origination and early evolution of Involutinida in the aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction: evidence for adaptation to a new mode of life in Early Triassic seas Journal of Paleontology Altiner, D., Payne, J. L. 2013
  • A LACK OF ATTRIBUTION: CLOSING THE CITATION GAP THROUGH A REFORM OF CITATION AND INDEXING PRACTICES TAXON Payne, J. L., Smith, F. A., Kowalewski, M., Krause, R. A., Boyer, A. G., McClain, C. R., Finnegan, S., Novack-Gottshall, P. M., Sheble, L. 2012; 61 (6): 1349-1351
  • Within- and among-genus components of size evolution during mass extinction, recovery, and background intervals: a case study of Late Permian through Late Triassic foraminifera PALEOBIOLOGY Rego, B. L., Wang, S. C., Altiner, D., Payne, J. L. 2012; 38 (4): 627-643
  • Carbon cycle dynamics following the end-Triassic mass extinction: Constraints from paired delta C-13(carb) and delta C-13(org) records GEOCHEMISTRY GEOPHYSICS GEOSYSTEMS Bachan, A., van de Schootbrugge, B., Fiebig, J., McRoberts, C. A., Ciarapica, G., Payne, J. L. 2012; 13
  • Lower Triassic oolites of the Nanpanjiang Basin, south China: Facies architecture, giant ooids, and diagenesis-Implications for hydrocarbon reservoirs AAPG BULLETIN Lehrmann, D. J., Minzoni, M., Li, X., Yu, M., Payne, J. L., Kelley, B. M., Schaal, E. K., Enos, P. 2012; 96 (8): 1389-1414
  • Size-Frequency Distributions along a Latitudinal Gradient in Middle Permian Fusulinoideans PLOS ONE Zhang, Y., Payne, J. L. 2012; 7 (6)

    Abstract

    Geographic gradients in body size within and among living species are commonly used to identify controls on the long-term evolution of organism size. However, the persistence of these gradients over evolutionary time remains largely unknown because ancient biogeographic variation in organism size is poorly documented. Middle Permian fusulinoidean foraminifera are ideal for investigating the temporal persistence of geographic gradients in organism size because they were diverse and abundant along a broad range of paleo-latitudes during this interval (~275-260 million years ago). In this study, we determined the sizes of Middle Permian fusulinoidean fossils from three different paleo-latitudinal zones in order to examine the relationship between the size of foraminifers and regional environment. We recovered the following results: keriothecal fusulinoideans are substantially larger than nonkeriothecal fusulinoideans; fusulinoideans from the equatorial zone are typically larger than those from the north and south transitional zones; neoschwagerinid specimens within a single species are generally larger in the equatorial zone than those in both transitional zones; and the nonkeriothecal fusulinoideans Staffellidae and Schubertellidae have smaller size in the north transitional zone. Fusulinoidean foraminifers differ from most other marine taxa in exhibiting larger sizes closer to the equator, contrary to Bergmann's rule. Meridional variation in seasonality, water temperature, nutrient availability, and carbonate saturation level are all likely to have favored or enabled larger sizes in equatorial regions. Temporal variation in atmospheric oxygen concentrations have been shown to account for temporal variation in fusulinoidean size during Carboniferous and Permian time, but oxygen availability appears unlikely to explain biogeographic variation in fusulinoidean sizes, because dissolved oxygen concentrations in seawater typically increase away from the equator due to declining seawater temperatures. Consequently, our findings highlight the fact that spatial gradients in organism size are not always controlled by the same factors that govern temporal trends within the same clade.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0038603

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305351700053

    View details for PubMedID 22685590

  • Factors controlling carbonate platform asymmetry: Preliminary results from the Great Bank of Guizhou, an isolated Permian-Triassic Platform in the Nanpanjiang Basin, south China PALAEOGEOGRAPHY PALAEOCLIMATOLOGY PALAEOECOLOGY Li, X., Yu, M., Lehrmann, D. J., Payne, J. L., Kelley, B. M., Minzoni, M. 2012; 315: 158-171
  • End-Permian Mass Extinction in the Oceans: An Ancient Analog for the Twenty-First Century? ANNUAL REVIEW OF EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES, VOL 40 Payne, J. L., Clapham, M. E. 2012; 40: 89-111
  • Acidification, anoxia, and extinction: A multiple logistic regression analysis of extinction selectivity during the Middle and Late Permian GEOLOGY Clapham, M. E., Payne, J. L. 2011; 39 (11): 1059-1062

    View details for DOI 10.1130/G32230.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296607600019

  • Local and global abundance associated with extinction risk in late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic gastropods PALEOBIOLOGY Payne, J. L., Truebe, S., Nuetzel, A., Chang, E. T. 2011; 37 (4): 616-632

    View details for DOI 10.5061/dryad.8330

    View details for Web of Science ID 000294881200006

  • Early and Middle Triassic trends in diversity, evenness, and size of foraminifers on a carbonate platform in south China: implications for tempo and mode of biotic recovery from the end-Permian mass extinction PALEOBIOLOGY Payne, J. L., Summers, M., Rego, B. L., Altiner, D., Wei, J., Yu, M., Lehrmann, D. J. 2011; 37 (3): 409-425
  • THE GEOZOIC SUPEREON PALAIOS Kowalewski, M., Payne, J. L., Smith, F. A., Wang, S. C., McShea, D. W., Xiao, S., Novack-Gottshall, P. M., McClain, C. R., Krause, R. A., Boyer, A. G., Finnegan, S., Lyons, S. K., Stempien, J. A., Alroy, J., Spaeth, P. A. 2011; 26 (5-6): 251-255
  • Escargots through time: an energetic comparison of marine gastropod assemblages before and after the Mesozoic Marine Revolution PALEOBIOLOGY Finnegan, S., McClain, C. M., Kosnik, M. A., Payne, J. L. 2011; 37 (2): 252-269
  • delta C-13 evidence that high primary productivity delayed recovery from end-Permian mass extinction EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS Meyer, K. M., Yu, M., Jost, A. B., Kelley, B. M., Payne, J. L. 2011; 302 (3-4): 378-384
  • The evolutionary consequences of oxygenic photosynthesis: a body size perspective PHOTOSYNTHESIS RESEARCH Payne, J. L., McClain, C. R., Boyer, A. G., Brown, J. H., Finnegan, S., Kowalewski, M., Krause, R. A., Lyons, S. K., McShea, D. W., Novack-Gottshall, P. M., Smith, F. A., Spaeth, P., Stempien, J. A., Wang, S. C. 2011; 107 (1): 37-57

    Abstract

    The high concentration of molecular oxygen in Earth's atmosphere is arguably the most conspicuous and geologically important signature of life. Earth's early atmosphere lacked oxygen; accumulation began after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria around 3.0-2.5 billion years ago (Gya). Concentrations of oxygen have since varied, first reaching near-modern values ~600 million years ago (Mya). These fluctuations have been hypothesized to constrain many biological patterns, among them the evolution of body size. Here, we review the state of knowledge relating oxygen availability to body size. Laboratory studies increasingly illuminate the mechanisms by which organisms can adapt physiologically to the variation in oxygen availability, but the extent to which these findings can be extrapolated to evolutionary timescales remains poorly understood. Experiments confirm that animal size is limited by experimental hypoxia, but show that plant vegetative growth is enhanced due to reduced photorespiration at lower O(2):CO(2). Field studies of size distributions across extant higher taxa and individual species in the modern provide qualitative support for a correlation between animal and protist size and oxygen availability, but few allow prediction of maximum or mean size from oxygen concentrations in unstudied regions. There is qualitative support for a link between oxygen availability and body size from the fossil record of protists and animals, but there have been few quantitative analyses confirming or refuting this impression. As oxygen transport limits the thickness or volume-to-surface area ratio-rather than mass or volume-predictions of maximum possible size cannot be constructed simply from metabolic rate and oxygen availability. Thus, it remains difficult to confirm that the largest representatives of fossil or living taxa are limited by oxygen transport rather than other factors. Despite the challenges of integrating findings from experiments on model organisms, comparative observations across living species, and fossil specimens spanning millions to billions of years, numerous tractable avenues of research could greatly improve quantitative constraints on the role of oxygen in the macroevolutionary history of organismal size.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11120-010-9593-1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000286199300004

    View details for PubMedID 20821265

  • Calcium isotope constraints on the end-Permian mass extinction PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Payne, J. L., Turchyn, A. V., Paytan, A., DePaolo, D. J., Lehrmann, D. J., Yu, M., Wei, J. 2010; 107 (19): 8543-8548

    Abstract

    The end-Permian mass extinction horizon is marked by an abrupt shift in style of carbonate sedimentation and a negative excursion in the carbon isotope (delta(13)C) composition of carbonate minerals. Several extinction scenarios consistent with these observations have been put forward. Secular variation in the calcium isotope (delta(44/40)Ca) composition of marine sediments provides a tool for distinguishing among these possibilities and thereby constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here we report delta(44/40)Ca across the Permian-Triassic boundary from marine limestone in south China. The delta(44/40)Ca exhibits a transient negative excursion of approximately 0.3 per thousand over a few hundred thousand years or less, which we interpret to reflect a change in the global delta(44/40)Ca composition of seawater. CO(2)-driven ocean acidification best explains the coincidence of the delta(44/40)Ca excursion with negative excursions in the delta(13)C of carbonates and organic matter and the preferential extinction of heavily calcified marine animals. Calcium isotope constraints on carbon cycle calculations suggest that the average delta(13)C of CO(2) released was heavier than -28 per thousand and more likely near -15 per thousand; these values indicate a source containing substantial amounts of mantle- or carbonate-derived carbon. Collectively, the results point toward Siberian Trap volcanism as the trigger of mass extinction.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0914065107

    View details for Web of Science ID 000277591200012

    View details for PubMedID 20421502

  • Erosional truncation of uppermost Permian shallow-marine carbonates and implications for Permian-Triassic boundary events: Reply GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA BULLETIN Payne, J. L., Lehrmann, D. J., Follett, D., Seibel, M., Kump, L. R., Riccardi, A., Altiner, D., Sano, H., Wei, J. 2009; 121 (5-6): 957-959

    View details for DOI 10.1130/B26588.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000265592200019

  • EARLY TRIASSIC MICROBIAL SPHEROIDS IN THE VIRGIN LIMESTONE MEMBER OF THE MOENKOPI FORMATION, NEVADA, USA PALAIOS Pruss, S. B., Payne, J. L. 2009; 24 (1-2): 131-136
  • The Red Queen revisited: reevaluating the age selectivity of Phanerozoic marine genus extinctions PALEOBIOLOGY Finnegan, S., Payne, J. L., Wang, S. C. 2008; 34 (3): 318-341
  • Carbon cycle perturbation and stabilization in the wake of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary mass-extinction event GEOCHEMISTRY GEOPHYSICS GEOSYSTEMS van de Schootbrugge, B., Payne, J. L., Tomasovych, A., Pross, J., Fiebig, J., Benbrahim, M., Foellmi, K. B., Quan, T. M. 2008; 9
  • Erosional truncation of uppermost Permian shallow-marine carbonates and implications for Permian-Triassic boundary events GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA BULLETIN Payne, J. L., Lehrmann, D. J., Follett, D., Seibel, M., Kump, L. R., Riccardi, A., Altiner, D., Sano, H., Wei, J. 2007; 119 (7-8): 771-784

    View details for DOI 10.1130/B26091.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000247896000001

  • The effect of geographic range on extinction risk during background and mass extinction PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Payne, J. L., Finnegan, S. 2007; 104 (25): 10506-10511

    Abstract

    Wide geographic range is generally thought to buffer taxa against extinction, but the strength of this effect has not been investigated for the great majority of the fossil record. Although the majority of genus extinctions have occurred between major mass extinctions, little is known about extinction selectivity regimes during these "background" intervals. Consequently, the question of whether selectivity regimes differ between background and mass extinctions is largely unresolved. Using logistic regression, we evaluated the selectivity of genus survivorship with respect to geographic range by using a global database of fossil benthic marine invertebrates spanning the Cambrian through the Neogene periods, an interval of approximately 500 My. Our results show that wide geographic range has been significantly and positively associated with survivorship for the great majority of Phanerozoic time. Moreover, the significant association between geographic range and survivorship remains after controlling for differences in species richness and abundance among genera. However, mass extinctions and several second-order extinction events exhibit less geographic range selectivity than predicted by range alone. Widespread environmental disturbance can explain the reduced association between geographic range and extinction risk by simultaneously affecting genera with similar ecological and physiological characteristics on global scales. Although factors other than geographic range have certainly affected extinction risk during many intervals, geographic range is likely the most consistently significant predictor of extinction risk in the marine fossil record.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0701257104

    View details for Web of Science ID 000247500000038

    View details for PubMedID 17563357

  • End-Permian mass extinction of lagenide foraminifers in the Southern Alps (Northern Italy) JOURNAL OF PALEONTOLOGY Groves, J. R., Rettori, R., Payne, J. L., Boyce, M. D., Altiner, D. 2007; 81 (3): 415-434
  • Paleophysiology and end-Permian mass extinction EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS Knoll, A. H., Barnbach, R. K., Payne, J. L., Pruss, S., Fischer, W. W. 2007; 256 (3-4): 295-313
  • Evidence for recurrent Early Triassic massive volcanism from quantitative interpretation of carbon isotope fluctuations EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS Payne, J. L., Kump, L. R. 2007; 256 (1-2): 264-277
  • Placunopsis bioherms: The first metazoan buildups following the end-Permian mass extinction PALAIOS Pruss, S. B., Payne, J. L., Bottjer, D. J. 2007; 22 (1): 17-23
  • Timing of recovery from the end-Permian extinction: Geochronologic and biostratigraphic constraints from south China GEOLOGY Lehrmann, D. J., Ramezani, J., Bowring, S. A., Martin, M. W., Montgomery, P., Enos, P., Payne, J. L., Orchard, M. J., Wang HongMei, H. M., Wei Jiayong, J. Y. 2006; 34 (12): 1053-1056
  • Environmental and biological controls on the initiation and growth of a Middle Triassic (Anisian) reef complex on the Great Bank of Guizhou, Guizhou Province, China PALAIOS Payne, J. L., Lehrmann, D. J., Christensen, S., Wei, J., Knoll, A. H. 2006; 21 (4): 325-343
  • Controls on marine animal biomass through geological time GEOBIOLOGY Payne, J. L., Finnegan, S. 2006; 4 (1): 1-10
  • The pattern and timing of biotic recovery from the end-Permian extinction on the Great Bank of Guizhou, Guizhou province, China PALAIOS Payne, J. L., Lehrmann, D. J., Wei, J. Y., Knoll, A. H. 2006; 21 (1): 63-85
  • Field Excursion 2: Permian-Triassic boundary and a Lower-Middle Triassic boundary sequence on the Great Bank of Guizhou, Nanpanjiang basin, southern Guizhou Province Albertiana Lehrmann, D. J., Payne, J. L., Enos, P., Montgomery, P., Wei, J., Yu, Y., Orchard, M. J. 2005; 33: 167-184
  • Evolutionary dynamics of gastropod size across the end-Permian extinction and through the Triassic recovery interval Paleobiology Payne, J. L. 2005; 31: 269-290
  • Permian and Triassic depositional history of the Yangtze platform and Great Bank of Guizhou in the Nanpanjiang basin of Guizhou and Guangxi, South China Albertiana Lehrmann, D. J., P., Enos, Payne, J. L., Montgomery, P., Wei, J., Yu, Y., Orchard, M. J. 2005; 33: 147-166
  • Lower Cretaceous Alisitos Formation at Punta San Isidro: Coastal sedimentation and volcanism Ciencias Marinas Payne, J. L, Johnson, M. E., Ledesma-Vazquez, J. 2004; 30: 365-380
  • Large perturbations of the carbon cycle during recovery from the end-Permian extinction Science Payne, J. L, J., Lehrmann D., J., Wei, Orchard, M. J., Schrag, D. P., Knoll, A. H. 2004; 305: 506-509
  • Applicability and resolving power of statistical tests for instantaneous extinction events in the fossil record Paleobiology Payne, J. L. 2003; 29: 37-51
  • Permian-Triassic boundary sections from shallow-marine carbonate platforms of the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China Palaios Lehrmann, D. J., Payne, J. L., Felix, S. V., Dillett, P. M., Wang, H., Yu, Y., Wei, J. 2003; 18: 138-152

Books and Book Chapters


  • Life in Triassic Oceans: Links between planktonic and benthic recovery and radiation Evolution of Primary Producers in the Sea Payne, J. L., van de Schootbrugge, B. edited by Falkowski, P., Knoll, A. H. Academic Press, Amsterdam. 2007: 165-189

Conference Proceedings


  • Record of the end-Permian extinction and Triassic biotic recovery in the Chongzuo-Pingguo platform, southern Nanpanjiang basin, Guangxi, south China Lehrmann, D. J., Payne, J. L., Pei, D., Enos, P., Druke, D., Steffen, K., Zhang, J., Wei, J., Orchard, M. J., Ellwood, B. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV. 2007: 200-217

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: