Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Adolescent Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, LPCH/Stanford (2011 - Present)
  • Clinical Instructor, LPCH (2003 - 2011)

Honors & Awards


  • Pediatric Clerkship Faculty Honor Roll, Dept of Pediatrics, Stanford Medical School (2007, 2008, 2010)
  • Faculty Teaching Award, Stanford Medical School, LPCH. (2006)
  • MCHB Postdoctoral Training Fellowship in Adolescent Health, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco (2000-2003)
  • Special graduation award for Student Advocacy, UCSF Class of 1997 (1997)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2000)
  • Residency:Children's Hospital Oakland (2000) CA
  • Internship:Children's Hospital Oakland (1998) CA
  • Board Certification: Adolescent Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics (2003)
  • Fellowship:UCSF Adolescent Medicine (2003) CA
  • Medical Education:UCSF School of Medicine (1997) CA
  • MPH, UC Berkeley, Maternal Child Health (2004)
  • Fellowship, UCSF, Adolescent Medicine (2003)
  • Residency, Children's Hospital Oakland, Pediatrics (2000)
  • MD, UCSF (1997)
  • BS, MIT, Biology (1993)

Community and International Work


  • President, N. CA SAHM

    Topic

    Adolescent Health

    Partnering Organization(s)

    N. CA Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine

    Populations Served

    health professionals, adolescents

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • SheHeroes.org, co-founder, Board president

    Topic

    Showing 3rd-6th graders that women can be whatever they work hard towards

    Partnering Organization(s)

    http://sheheroes.org/

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Silver Ribbon Campaign to Trust Women

    Topic

    Reproductive rights, abortion, women's equality

    Partnering Organization(s)

    http://oursilverribbon.org/

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • N. CA AAP Pediatric Obesity Interest Group

    Topic

    Pediatric Obesity

    Partnering Organization(s)

    AAP

    Populations Served

    community, MDs, patients

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Reproductive Rights

    Topic

    Access to contraception and abortion

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health, Center for Reproductive Rights

    Populations Served

    all

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Vice President, N. CA SAHM

    Topic

    Adolescent medicine

    Partnering Organization(s)

    N. CA Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Emergency contraception access, availability, knowledge.

Pediatric obesity and its treament with videogames and pedometers.

Adolescent use and access to contraception.

Using computers to educate patients during waiting time.

Determinants of Tampon use/initiation.

Health needs of adolescents in local high schools. Obesity, exercise, mental health, reproductive health.

Attitudes towards a reproductive health clinic - parents perspective, adolescents.

Publications

Journal Articles


  • IUDs and Adolescents An Under-Utilized Opportunity for Pregnancy Prevention JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT GYNECOLOGY Yen, S., Saah, T., Hillard, P. J. 2010; 23 (3): 123-128

    Abstract

    Most pregnancies in adolescents are unintended and preventable if contraception were utilized. IUDs provide an under-utilized highly effective form of contraception. IUDs are appropriate for nulliparous women, including adolescents. IUDs do not increase: the incidence of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease after the 1st month of insertion, the odds of infertility, nor rate of ectopic pregnancy. Adolesecnts need more education about and increased access to IUDs. Practical points regarding IUD selection and insertion in adolescents are reviewed, including pain prophylaxis, anticipatory guidance, side effects and complications. In summary, IUDs are safe for contraception in most adolescents. IUDs are effective and eliminate the need for ongoing adherence and thus have the potential to decrease unplanned pregnancies.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jpag.2009.09.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278173800002

    View details for PubMedID 19896396

  • Feasibility of a dance videogame to promote weight loss among overweight children and adolescents ARCHIVES OF PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENT MEDICINE Madsen, K. A., Yen, S., Wlasiuk, L., Newman, T. B., Lustig, R. 2007; 161 (1): 105-107

    View details for Web of Science ID 000243273800018

    View details for PubMedID 17199076

  • Bacterial vaginosis in sexually experienced and non-sexually experienced young women entering the military OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Yen, S., SHAFER, M. A., Moncada, J., Campbell, C. J., Flinn, S. D., Boyer, C. B. 2003; 102 (5): 927-933

    Abstract

    To estimate the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis by Nugent Gram stain criteria in a nonclinic national sample of young women entering recruit training; to examine clinical associations with bacterial vaginosis; and to evaluate the performance of a pH test card and Papanicolaou smear against Gram stain as screening tools for bacterial vaginosis.A cross-sectional study of 1938 women was conducted. Self-collected vaginal swabs were applied to a colorimetric pH test card and a glass slide for Gram stain evaluation according to the Nugent criteria. Papanicolaou smears and samples for sexually transmitted diseases screening were collected during routine entry pelvic examinations.Bacterial vaginosis prevalence was 27%, with 28% in sexually experienced and 18% in non-sexually experienced women (P = .001). Bacterial vaginosis prevalence was 11% in Asian/Pacific Islanders, which was lower than in other nonwhite ethnic groups (P = .004). Clinically, bacterial vaginosis was directly related to multiple sexual partners (P = .026), self-report of vaginal discharge (P = .001), self-report of vaginal odor (P < .001), and concurrent Chlamydia trachomatis infection (P = .002), and inversely related to hormonal contraceptive use (P = .013). Vaginal discharge did not achieve statistical significance in multivariate analysis. Compared with the Nugent criteria, the sensitivities and specificities for bacterial vaginosis diagnosis were as follows: colorimetric pH test: 72% and 67%; Papanicolaou smear: 72% and 79%, respectively.Among these diverse young women, bacterial vaginosis occurs commonly in both sexually experienced and inexperienced young women and differs by race and ethnicity. The pH colorimetric test and Papanicolaou smear performed moderately well as screening tools for bacterial vaginosis. The inverse relationship of bacterial vaginosis with hormonal contraceptive use and its direct relationship with C. trachomatis need further study.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0029-7844(03)00858-5

    View details for Web of Science ID 000186294400009

    View details for PubMedID 14672465

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