Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics
  • Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Program Director of Curriculum, Pediatric Residency Program (2013 - Present)
  • Physician Lead, Patient Experience, LPCH (2013 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • ROSE Award for recognition of service excellence, LPCH (2012)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2010)
  • Residency:University of Washington Childrens Hospital and Regional Medical Center (2010) WA
  • Medical Education:Stanford University School of Medicine (2007) CA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Patient experience; medical education; performance improvement; clinical pathway and orderset creation, implementation and use

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Analysis of factors that modify susceptibility and rate of progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS Qureshi, M. M., Hayden, D., Urbinelli, L., Ferrante, K., Newhall, K., Myers, D., Hilgenberg, S., Smart, R., Brown, R. H., Cudkowicz, M. E. 2006; 7 (3): 173-182

    Abstract

    We conducted case-control and prospective longitudinal studies to examine risk factors and predictors of disease progression for ALS. Ninety-five subjects with ALS and 106 healthy control subjects were enrolled. All subjects completed a risk factor questionnaire at enrollment. The ALS subjects were prospectively followed for one year to define factors that influence the rate of disease progression, measured by rate of change in percent predicted forced vital capacity (%FVC) and the ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS) score. The association of each potential risk factor with ALS was determined using univariate logistic regression. A random slope model was used to determine the association of each risk factor with disease progression. The demographic characteristics of ALS subjects and controls at enrollment did not differ. Significant risk factors for ALS included reported exposure to lead (p = 0.02) and pesticides (p = 0.03). Disease progression was faster in the ALS subjects having bulbar onset and a shorter time period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Pertinent variables not associated with either causation or progression of ALS included physical activity, cigarette smoking and a history of physical trauma or other clinical disorders.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/14660820600640596

    View details for Web of Science ID 000241153900007

    View details for PubMedID 16963407

  • Transformation: from medical student to patient. Annals of internal medicine Hilgenberg, S. 2006; 144 (10): 779-780

    View details for PubMedID 16702597

  • Increased plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with Alzheimer's disease NEUROCHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL Lorenzl, S., Albers, D. S., Relkin, N., Ngyuen, T., Hilgenberg, S. L., Chirichigno, J., Cudkowicz, M. E., Beal, M. F. 2003; 43 (3): 191-196

    Abstract

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may play a role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). MMP-9 and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are elevated in postmortem brain tissue of AD patients. MMPs and TIMPs are found in neurons, microglia, vascular endothelial cells and leukocytes. The aim of this study was to determine whether circulating levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 are elevated in the plasma of AD patients. We compared AD patients to age- and gender-matched controls as well as to Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. There was constitutive expression of gelatinase A (MMP-2), and gelatinase B (MMP-9), in all the samples as shown by zymographic analysis. Levels of MMP-9 were significantly (P=0.003) elevated in the plasma of AD patients as compared to controls. Plasma levels of MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were unchanged. There were no significant changes of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in PD and ALS samples. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were significantly correlated with MMP-9 in the AD patients. ApoE genotyping of plasma samples showed that levels of MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 and MMP-9 were not significantly different between the ApoE subgroups. These findings indicate that circulating levels of MMP-9 are increased in AD and may contribute to disease pathology.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/S0197-0186(03)00004-4

    View details for Web of Science ID 000182900400002

    View details for PubMedID 12689599

  • Tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of neurodegenerative diseases JOURNAL OF THE NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES Lorenzl, S., Albers, D. S., LeWitt, P. A., Chirichigno, J. W., Hilgenberg, S. L., Cudkowicz, M. E., Beal, M. F. 2003; 207 (1-2): 71-76

    Abstract

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Increased expression of MMP-9 and TIMPs has been reported in postmortem AD and ALS brain tissue, as well as in ALS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma. Although individual studies of MMP and TIMP expression in CSF have included AD and ALS samples, there are no studies comparing the expression of these proteins between neurodegenerative diseases. We measured the levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMPs (e.g. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) in CSF samples from patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), Huntington's Disease (HD), AD and ALS as compared to age-matched control patients. There was constitutive expression of the proform of gelatinase A (proMMP-2) on zymography gels in all CSF samples. Unexpectedly, there was an additional gelatinolytic band at 130 kDa of unknown etiology in the CSF samples of patients with PD (61% of patients studied), AD (61%), HD (25%) and ALS (39%). Levels of TIMP-1 were significantly elevated in CSF samples from all disease groups. TIMP-2 was significantly increased in CSF of AD and HD patients. MMP-2 levels did not differ significantly between groups. These findings show that TIMPs are elevated in the CSF of patients with neurodegenerative diseases suggesting a potential role of these endogenous inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases in neurodegenerative diseases.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000181533500012

    View details for PubMedID 12614934

Conference Proceedings


  • “Recipient of a finding incidental to research” Incidental Findings in Research, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues Hilgenberg, S. http://bioethics.gov/node/1617. 2013

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