Bio

Professional Education


  • Bachelor of Science, University Of Peshawar (2005)
  • B of Medicine and B of Surgery, University Of Peshawar (2012)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Treatment Outcomes in the Study of Safety and Bioactivity of TOcilizumab in Patients with Non-Infectious UVEITIS: The STOP-UVEITIS Study Nguyen, N. V., Hassan, M., Halim, M., Afridi, R., Baluyot, S., Sepah, Y. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2018
  • Posterior Segment Inflammatory Outcomes (Month-6) in the STOP-Uveitis Study: Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Tocilizumab in Patients with Non-Infectious Uveitis Sadiq, M., Hassan, M., Halim, M., Afridi, R., Do, D. V., Quan Dong Nguyen, Sepah, Y. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2018
  • Scleral Vessel Density Using Novel Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Methodology Halim, M., Hassan, M., Afridi, R., Nguyen, N. V., Maleki, A., Baluyot, S., Sepah, Y. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2018
  • Can Fundus Photograph Montage Replace the Standard 7-Field Stereo Images for Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scale Assessments? Baluyot, S., Hassan, M., Halim, M., Afridi, R., Nguyen, N. V., Sepah, Y. ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC. 2018
  • Diurnal variation of choriocapillaris vessel flow density in normal subjects measured using optical coherence tomography angiography. International journal of retina and vitreous Sarwar, S., Hassan, M., Soliman, M. K., Halim, M. S., Sadiq, M. A., Afridi, R., Agarwal, A., Do, D. V., Nguyen, Q. D., Sepah, Y. J. 2018; 4: 37

    Abstract

    Background: Vessel flow density (VFD) may provide important information regarding perfusion status. Diurnal variation in VFD of choriocapillaris has not been reported in literature. In the index study, optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) was used to assess the diurnal variation of the VFD in the choriocapillaris of subjects with no known ocular disease.Methods: Fifty eyes with no known ocular disease (25 subjects) were included. OCTA images were acquired using AngioVue (Optovue, Fremont, CA, USA) at two different time points on a single day: 9:00 AM and 6:00 PM. Macular cube scan protocol (3*3mm) centered on the fovea was used. Automatic segmentation of the retinal layers and choriocapillaris was performed using ReVue software, which was also used to measure the choriocapillaris VFD. Horizontal line scan passing through fovea was obtained by the device at both time points to measure the subfoveal choroidal thickness (CT). Linear measurement tool of software was used to measure subfoveal CT according to a standardized reproducible method. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess the differences in choriocapillaris VFD and subfoveal CT at the two time points. Correlation between change in choriocapillaris VFD and subfoveal CT at the two time points was assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r).Results: The mean age of the subjects was 31.96±11.23years. Choriocapillaris VFD was significantly higher at 9:00 AM compared to 6:00 PM (P<0.0001) with mean choriocapillaris VFD of 68.74±4.80% at 9:00 AM and 67.57±5.41% at 6:00 PM, with a mean diurnal amplitude of 1.17%. Mean subfoveal CT was 287.74±61.51m at 9:00 AM and 270.06±60.73m at 6:00 PM. Subfoveal CT was also significantly higher at 9:00 AM compared to 6:00 PM (P<0.0001) with a mean diurnal amplitude of 17.68m. Change in choriocapillaris VFD correlated with change in subfoveal CT (r=0.87, P<0.001).Conclusion: OCTA demonstrated significant diurnal change in choriocapillaris VFD in subjects without any ocular disease with VFD being higher in the morning and lower in the evening. Decrease in choriocapillaris VFD in the evening correlated with a reduction in subfoveal CT.

    View details for DOI 10.1186/s40942-018-0140-0

    View details for PubMedID 30338130

  • Primary (Month-6) Outcomes of the STOP-Uveitis Study: Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Tocilizumab in Patients With Noninfectious Uveitis AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY Sepah, Y., Sadiq, M., Chu, D. S., Dacey, M., Gallemore, R., Dayani, P., Hanout, M., Hassan, M., Afridi, R., Agarwal, A., Halim, M., Do, D. V., Quan Dong Nguyen 2017; 183: 71–80

    Abstract

    To report the primary endpoint analyses of the safety and efficacy of 2 different doses of intravenous (IV) infusions of tocilizumab (TCZ), an IL-6 inhibitor, in eyes with noninfectious intermediate uveitis, posterior uveitis, or panuveitis.Randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial.STOP-Uveitis is a randomized, open-label safety, efficacy, and bioactivity clinical trial conducted at 5 clinical centers across the United States. The study evaluated the role of TCZ in patients with noninfectious uveitis (NIU). Thirty-seven patients with NIU were randomized into one of 2 treatment groups in a ratio of 1:1. Group 1 received IV infusions of 4 mg/kg TCZ and group 2 received IV infusions of 8 mg/kg TCZ. Infusions were given every 4 weeks in both groups until month 6 (primary endpoint). Primary outcome measure was incidence and severity of systemic and ocular adverse events through month 6. Secondary outcome measures included mean change in visual acuity (VA), vitreous haze (VH), and central macular thickness (CMT) at month 6.A total of 37 patients were randomized in the study. At month 6, 43.5% of patients who had the potential for a 2-step decrease in VH demonstrated a 2-step decrease (40% in Group 1 and 46.1% in Group 2). Mean change in CMT was -83.88 ± 136.1 μm at month 6 (-131.5 ± 41.56 μm in Group 1 and -38.92 ± 13.7 μm in Group 2). Mean change in VA was +8.22 ± 11.83 ETDRS letters at month 6 (10.9 ± 14.6 in Group 1 and 5.5 ± 7.8 in Group 2). Repeated infusions of TCZ were well tolerated.Repeated IV administrations of TCZ are well tolerated. TCZ (both 4 and 8 mg/kg) is effective in improving VA and reducing VH and CMT in eyes with noninfectious intermediate uveitis, posterior uveitis, and panuveitis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ajo.2017.08.019

    View details for Web of Science ID 000414723100010

    View details for PubMedID 28887113