Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Psychiatry

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship:National Institutes of Health (1998) MD
  • Board Certification: Psychiatry, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (1995)
  • Residency:UCSF Medical Center (1994) CA
  • Medical Education:UCSF School of Medicine (1990) CA

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Psychopharmacologic treatment strategies for depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia ANNALS OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Glick, I. D., Suppes, T., Debattista, C., Hu, R. J., Marder, S. 2001; 134 (1): 47-60

    Abstract

    Patients with serious psychiatric disorders are frequently treated by primary care physicians, who may have difficulty keeping up with recent advances in psychiatry. This paper presents an updated synopsis for three major psychiatric illnesses: major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Current definitions, updated diagnostic criteria, short- and long-term treatment strategies with algorithms, and special challenges for the clinician are discussed for each of these illnesses. On the basis of each illness's distinct characteristics, five treatment principles are emphasized: 1) Treatment strategies should be long-term and should emphasize adherence, 2) treatment choice should be empirical, 3) combinations of medications may be helpful, 4) a combination of psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments may be more useful than either alone, and 5) the family or "significant others" as well as a consumer organization need to be involved. Some of the new directions in dinical research to refine these strategies and meet these challenges are also described.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000166043300007

    View details for PubMedID 11187420

Conference Proceedings


  • Treatment with atypical antipsychotics: new indications and new populations Glick, I. D., Murray, S. R., Vasudevan, P., Marder, S. R., Hu, R. J. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD. 2001: 187-191

    Abstract

    Atypical antipsychotics have revolutionized the treatment of schizophrenia, becoming the treatment of choice for patients not only during their first episode, but also throughout their life course. Of note, as of 1999 more than 70% of prescriptions for these drugs are being prescribed for conditions other than schizophrenia, such as bipolar disorder and geriatric agitation. While there have been very few controlled trials that have established the efficacy of the atypical antipsychotics for these "off-label" uses, there have been a large number of open trials and case reports. The few controlled trials suggest that the atypical antipsychotics may be useful for affective disorders (both mania and depression), geriatric conditions such as senile dementia and aggression, as well as a variety of other disorders. Atypical agents may be particularly helpful for elderly, child, or adolescent patients who are especially susceptible to the side effects of medications and whose risk of tardive dyskinesia is high but further controlled studies are necessary.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000169978600007

    View details for PubMedID 11461715

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