Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Diagnostic Radiology
  • Radiology

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Certificate of Merit, RSNA (December 2013)
  • Certificate of Merit., American Roentgen Ray Society Washington, DC. (April 2013.)
  • First Resident Advocate Award, Stanford Department of Radiology (2011-2012)
  • Hounsfield Award (Co-recipient), SCBT/MR (2002)
  • Exhibit Award Winner, RSNA (2002)
  • Editor's Certificate of Recognition, RSNA/ Radiographics (2000)
  • Teacher of the Year, Radiology, Stanford University (1998)
  • Highest Evaluations, Department of Surgery, Stanford (1997, 1998)
  • Letter of Outstanding Instruction, Committee on Course and Instruction, Stanford Medicine (1994)
  • Teacher of the Year, Radiology, Stanford University (1991)
  • Elected Member, Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists (1986)
  • Fellow, American College of Radiology (1986)
  • Teacher of the Year, Radiology, Stanford University (1984)

Professional Education


  • Internship:New England Medical Center (1966) MA
  • Board Certification: Diagnostic Radiology, American Board of Radiology (1971)
  • Residency:Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1969) NY
  • Medical Education:SUNY Upstate Medical University (1965) NY

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Abdominal imaging.
Mesenteries,
Peritoneum,
Omentum,
Pancreatic anatomy and embryology.
Third World diseases.
Abdominal trauma.

Teaching

2010-11 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Benign Gastric Ulcer Erosion Leading to a Gastropericardial Fistula in a Patient with No Known Risk Factors, Clinical Imaging. Reicher, J., Mindelzun, R. 2014
  • The Fat Triangle Sign: improving diagnostic accuracy of extraperitoneal bladder rupture ABDOMINAL IMAGING Gross, M., Mindelzun, R., Jeffrey, R. B. 2010; 35 (2): 253-255

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00261-009-9502-2

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276510000020

    View details for PubMedID 19259726

  • Computed Tomographic Diagnosis of Appendicitis Within a Spigelian Hernia JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED TOMOGRAPHY Deshmukh, S., Ghanouni, P., Mindelzun, R., Roos, J. 2010; 34 (2): 199-200

    Abstract

    A Spigelian hernia is a rare abdominal wall hernia diagnosed with ultrasonography or computed tomography. We report the first case of acute appendicitis within a Spigelian hernia diagnosed by computed tomography.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/RCT.0b013e3181b766d9

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276496600007

    View details for PubMedID 20351503

  • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules in CT scans: radiologist performance and reading time with incremental CAD assistance EUROPEAN RADIOLOGY Roos, J. E., Paik, D., Olsen, D., Liu, E. G., Chow, L. C., Leung, A. N., Mindelzun, R., Choudhury, K. R., Naidich, D. P., Napel, S., Rubin, G. D. 2010; 20 (3): 549-557

    Abstract

    The diagnostic performance of radiologists using incremental CAD assistance for lung nodule detection on CT and their temporal variation in performance during CAD evaluation was assessed.CAD was applied to 20 chest multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) scans containing 190 non-calcified > or =3-mm nodules. After free search, three radiologists independently evaluated a maximum of up to 50 CAD detections/patient. Multiple free-response ROC curves were generated for free search and successive CAD evaluation, by incrementally adding CAD detections one at a time to the radiologists' performance.The sensitivity for free search was 53% (range, 44%-59%) at 1.15 false positives (FP)/patient and increased with CAD to 69% (range, 59-82%) at 1.45 FP/patient. CAD evaluation initially resulted in a sharp rise in sensitivity of 14% with a minimal increase in FP over a time period of 100 s, followed by flattening of the sensitivity increase to only 2%. This transition resulted from a greater prevalence of true positive (TP) versus FP detections at early CAD evaluation and not by a temporal change in readers' performance. The time spent for TP (9.5 s +/- 4.5 s) and false negative (FN) (8.4 s +/- 6.7 s) detections was similar; FP decisions took two- to three-times longer (14.4 s +/- 8.7 s) than true negative (TN) decisions (4.7 s +/- 1.3 s).When CAD output is ordered by CAD score, an initial period of rapid performance improvement slows significantly over time because of non-uniformity in the distribution of TP CAD output and not to a changing reader performance over time.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00330-009-1596-y

    View details for Web of Science ID 000274544800005

    View details for PubMedID 19760237

  • Abnormal findings on routine upper GI series following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass OBESITY SURGERY Raman, R., Raman, B., Raman, P., Rossiter, S., Curet, M. J., Mindelzun, R., Morton, J. M. 2007; 17 (3): 311-316

    Abstract

    The use of postoperative upper GI series (UGIS) after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) varies among bariatric surgeons. The authors describe the findings and impact of UGIS after LRYGBP.From July 2003 to January 2006, 487 patients undergoing primary LRYGBP at a single academic institution had a single-contrast Gastrografin UGIS performed on the first postoperative day, without complication. Patient and operative demographics were: mean age 43 years, mean BMI 47 kg/m2, female 84%, and laparoscopic 100%.Of the 487 patients, the UGIS revealed 14 (2.9%) major and 88 (15.2%) minor abnormalities. Among the major UGIS abnormalities, 6 (1.2%) demonstrated a gastrojejunal anastomotic (GJA) leak, 8 (1.4%) confirmed complete obstruction at the GJA, and 1 (0.2%) disclosed a communication with the bypassed stomach. For the minor UGIS abnormalities, 45 (9.2%) displayed significant delay in contrast passage through the GJA, 23 (5.0%) had evidence of dilated loops of small and/or large bowel, and 6 (1.2%) verified miscellaneous abnormal findings (malrotation, lower esophageal dysmotility, jejunal clots). Patients with UGIS abnormalities necessitated additional procedures, delayed oral intake and/or longer length of stay (LOS).UGIS on postoperative day 1 is a useful means of evaluating postoperative LRYGBP anatomy and influenced postoperative care.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000245043900005

    View details for PubMedID 17546837

  • Pulmonary nodules on multi-detector row CT scans: Performance comparison of radiologists and computer-aided detection RADIOLOGY Rubin, G. D., Lyo, J. K., Paik, D. S., Sherbondy, A. J., Chow, L. C., Leung, A. N., Mindelzun, R., Schraedley-Desmond, P. K., Zinck, S. E., Naidich, D. P., Napel, S. 2005; 234 (1): 274-283

    Abstract

    To compare the performance of radiologists and of a computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithm for pulmonary nodule detection on thin-section thoracic computed tomographic (CT) scans.The study was approved by the institutional review board. The requirement of informed consent was waived. Twenty outpatients (age range, 15-91 years; mean, 64 years) were examined with chest CT (multi-detector row scanner, four detector rows, 1.25-mm section thickness, and 0.6-mm interval) for pulmonary nodules. Three radiologists independently analyzed CT scans, recorded the locus of each nodule candidate, and assigned each a confidence score. A CAD algorithm with parameters chosen by using cross validation was applied to the 20 scans. The reference standard was established by two experienced thoracic radiologists in consensus, with blind review of all nodule candidates and free search for additional nodules at a dedicated workstation for three-dimensional image analysis. True-positive (TP) and false-positive (FP) results and confidence levels were used to generate free-response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plots. Double-reading performance was determined on the basis of TP detections by either reader.The 20 scans showed 195 noncalcified nodules with a diameter of 3 mm or more (reference reading). Area under the alternative free-response ROC curve was 0.54, 0.48, 0.55, and 0.36 for CAD and readers 1-3, respectively. Differences between reader 3 and CAD and between readers 2 and 3 were significant (P < .05); those between CAD and readers 1 and 2 were not significant. Mean sensitivity for individual readings was 50% (range, 41%-60%); double reading resulted in increase to 63% (range, 56%-67%). With CAD used at a threshold allowing only three FP detections per CT scan, mean sensitivity was increased to 76% (range, 73%-78%). CAD complemented individual readers by detecting additional nodules more effectively than did a second reader; CAD-reader weighted kappa values were significantly lower than reader-reader weighted kappa values (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P < .05).With CAD used at a level allowing only three FP detections per CT scan, sensitivity was substantially higher than with conventional double reading.

    View details for DOI 10.1148/radiol.2341040589

    View details for Web of Science ID 000225864800038

    View details for PubMedID 15537839

  • Cisterna chyli at routine abdominal MR imaging: A normal anatomic structure in the retrocrural space RADIOGRAPHICS Pinto, P. S., Sirlin, C. B., Andrade-Barreto, O. A., Brown, M. A., Mindelzun, R. E., Mattrey, R. F. 2004; 24 (3): 809-817

    Abstract

    The cisterna chyli, a dilated lymphatic sac in the retrocrural space, represents the origin of the thoracic duct. It is seen in approximately half of lymphangiographic studies and 20% of autopsies. Highly fluid-sensitive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences such as single-shot rapid acquisition with refocused echoes, which are currently used in many abdominal MR imaging protocols, frequently result in the depiction of this structure. The cisterna chyli was evident on abdominal MR images acquired in 30 (15%) of 200 consecutive patients who underwent MR imaging at the authors' institution between February and June 2002. Its appearance varied from that of a thick tube to that of a thin tube, parallel or converging tubes, tortuous tubes, a sausage-shaped fluid collection, a focal collection, or a focal plexus. Radiologists who perform MR imaging should be familiar with the various possible appearances of this normal anatomic structure so as not to mistake it for a pathologic entity.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000221289700012

    View details for PubMedID 15143230

  • Simultanagnosia through the eyes of an artist NEUROLOGY Smith, W. S., Mindelzun, R. E., Miller, B. 2003; 60 (11): 1832-1834

    Abstract

    An 87-year-old artist experienced a top-of-the-basilar-artery embolic stroke secondary to atrial fibrillation and manifested a visual agnosia. Prior to her stroke, she painted scenes solely from memory. During her stroke recovery, her serial drawings and paintings revealed selective attention to the left lower quadrant, with important aspects of the whole image "clipped," as if missing from her internal representation of the whole object. Years later, her artistic abilities returned with only minor differences from those prior to her stroke.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000183418400024

    View details for PubMedID 12796543

  • Local staging of pancreatic carcinoma with multi-detector row CT: Use of curved planar reformations initial experience RADIOLOGY Prokesch, R. W., Chow, L. C., Beaulieu, C. F., Nino-Murcia, M., Mindelzun, R. E., Barnmer, R., Huang, J., Jeffrey, R. B. 2002; 225 (3): 759-765

    Abstract

    To evaluate the utility of curved planar reformations compared with standard transverse images in the assessment of pancreatic tumors.Forty-three patients suspected of having pancreatic tumors underwent contrast material-enhanced biphasic multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Curved planar reformations were generated along the pancreatic duct, common bile duct, and major mesenteric vessels. Three blinded independent readers assessed the curved planar reformations and transverse images separately for the presence of tumor, resectability, and vascular involvement. The results were compared with those of a consensus panel who evaluated the curved planar reformations and transverse images together along with clinical data and surgical findings.Of 43 patients, 20 had pancreatic malignancies as judged by the consensus panel and proven at biopsy and/or clinical follow-up. For tumor detection, transverse images and curved planar reformations had an average sensitivity of 95.0% and 98.4% (P >.05), respectively, and an average specificity of 90.9% and 91.3% (P >.05), respectively. For tumor resectability, transverse images and curved planar reformations had an average sensitivity of 85.7% and 71.4% (P >.05), respectively, and an average specificity of 85.2% and 84.3% (P >.05), respectively. Average interpretation time was 6.4 minutes with transverse images and 4.1 minutes with curved planar reformations.Curved planar reformations are equivalent to transverse images in the detection of pancreatic tumors and determination of surgical resectability.

    View details for DOI 10.1148/radiol.2253010886

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179420800020

    View details for PubMedID 12461258

  • Digital storage phosphor chest radiography: An ROC study of the effect of 2K versus 4K matrix size on observer performance RADIOLOGY Miro, S. P., Leung, A. N., Rubin, G. D., Choi, Y. H., Kee, S. T., Mindelzun, R. E., Stark, P., Wexler, L., Plevritis, S. K., Betts, B. J. 2001; 218 (2): 527-532

    Abstract

    To compare observer performance in the detection of abnormalities on 1,760 x 2,140 matrix (2K) and 3,520 x 4,280 matrix (4K) digital storage phosphor chest radiographs.One hundred sixty patients who underwent dedicated computed tomography (CT) of the thorax were prospectively recruited into the study. Posteroanterior and lateral computed radiographs of the chest were acquired in each patient and printed in 2K and 4K formats. Six radiologists independently analyzed the hard-copy images and scored the presence of parenchymal (opacities 2 cm, and subtle interstitial), mediastinal, and pleural abnormalities on a five-point confidence scale. With CT as the reference standard, observer performance tests were carried out by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.Analysis of averaged observer performance showed 2K and 4K images were equally effective in detection of all three groups of abnormalities. In the detection of the three subtypes of parenchymal abnormalities, there were no significant differences in averaged performance between the 2K and 4K formats (area below ROC curve [A(z)] values: opacities 2 cm, 0.86 +/-.025 and 0.85 +/- 0.030; subtle interstitial abnormalities, 0.73 +/- 0.041 and 0.72 +/- 0.041). Averaged performance in detection of mediastinal and pleural abnormalities was equivalent (A(z) values: mediastinal, 0.70 +/- 0.046 and 0.73 +/- 0.033; pleural, 0.85 +/- 0.032 and 0.86 +/- 0.033).Observer performance in detection of parenchymal, mediastinal, and pleural abnormalities was not significantly different on 2K and 4K storage phosphor chest radiographs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000166728200033

    View details for PubMedID 11161174

  • Suspected acute appendicitis: Nonenhanced helical CT in 300 consecutive patients RADIOLOGY Lane, M. J., Liu, D. M., Huynh, M. D., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E., Katz, D. S. 1999; 213 (2): 341-346

    Abstract

    To determine the accuracy of helical computed tomography (CT) without the oral, intravenous, or rectal administration of contrast material in confirming suspected acute appendicitis.Three hundred consecutive patients referred from the departments of surgery and emergency medicine were examined for suspected acute appendicitis by using thin-section nonenhanced helical CT. All transverse CT scans were obtained in a single breath hold from the upper abdomen (T12 vertebra) to the pubic symphysis with 5-mm collimation and a pitch of 1.6. All scans were obtained without oral, intravenous, or rectal contrast material. Criteria for diagnosis of acute appendicitis included an enlarged appendix (> 6 mm) and periappendiceal inflammation. CT diagnoses were recorded prospectively. Final diagnoses were established with the results of surgical or clinical follow-up or both.There were 110 true-positive diagnoses, 181 true-negative diagnoses (63 of which were an alternative diagnosis correctly established prospectively), five false-negative diagnoses, and four false-positive diagnoses, which yielded a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 99%, and an accuracy of 97%.Nonenhanced helical CT is a highly accurate technique for diagnosing or excluding acute appendicitis. Developing experience with the technique and understanding the subtleties of interpretation can further improve diagnostic accuracy.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000083308900005

    View details for PubMedID 10551210

  • Malignant fibrous histiocytoma presenting as cystic pancreatic mass ABDOMINAL IMAGING Liu, D. M., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E. 1999; 24 (3): 299-300

    Abstract

    Although malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a common sarcoma of late adulthood, it has rarely been reported to involve the pancreas. We describe the clinical and imaging features of a 27-year-old patient presenting with a predominantly cystic MFH. The cystic appearance of the lesion corresponded histologically to necrosis and hemorrhage within the mass.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000080166900019

    View details for PubMedID 10227898

  • Unenhanced CT of abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage SEMINARS IN ULTRASOUND CT AND MRI Katz, D. S., Lane, M. J., Mindelzun, R. E. 1999; 20 (2): 94-107

    Abstract

    CT performed without oral or intravenous contrast is the initial imaging study of choice in many situations for the detection of hemorrhage anywhere in the abdomen and pelvis. The presence or absence of hemorrhage can be determined rapidly, and the amount and precise location of hemorrhage can also be evaluated. This article reviews the appearances and the common and unusual etiologies of abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage on unenhanced CT. The role of intravenous contrast-enhanced CT in patients with known or suspected abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage is also examined.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079764600006

    View details for PubMedID 10222518

  • The acute abdomen: Current CT imaging techniques SEMINARS IN ULTRASOUND CT AND MRI Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B. 1999; 20 (2): 63-67

    Abstract

    Currently, CT plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of the patient with an acute abdomen. Several competing techniques have been described and investigated. Each appears to possess advantages and disadvantages which will be examined. Each imaging center needs to modify these protocols to satisfy local scanner availability, patient demographics, radiologic expertise, and economic considerations.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079764600002

    View details for PubMedID 10222514

  • Appendicitis and its mimickers SEMINARS IN ULTRASOUND CT AND MRI Lane, M. J., Mindelzun, R. E. 1999; 20 (2): 77-85

    Abstract

    Unenhanced helical CT is an accurate technique for the evaluation of patients with suspected acute appendicitis. This non-operator-dependent examination can be performed without the risk of intravenous contrast material or the delay associated with the use of oral and rectal contrast material. This article reviews the unenhanced helical CT findings of acute appendicitis and those entities that commonly mimic acute appendicitis clinically.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000079764600004

    View details for PubMedID 10222516

  • Hepatic abscess following transhepatic drainage of subphrenic abscess ABDOMINAL IMAGING Yu, A., Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B. 1999; 24 (2): 163-164

    Abstract

    A case of an hepatic abscess that developed after percutaneous transhepatic drainage of a subphrenic abscess is presented. The location of the abscess immediately along the tract of the drainage catheter and the similar organisms recovered from bacteriologic culture suggest that the abscess was related to direct contamination along the tract of the drainage catheter. The potential for abscess formation within the liver should be considered in the choice of access route for percutaneous drainage of retroabdominal abscesses. It may be preferable to avoid transhepatic drainage in patients in whom it is anticipated that the catheter drainage will require considerable length of time.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000078810300013

    View details for PubMedID 10024403

  • Annular pancreas in adults: imaging features in seven patients ABDOMINAL IMAGING Jadvar, H., Mindelzun, R. E. 1999; 24 (2): 174-177

    Abstract

    Annular pancreas is a rare congenital abnormality that may be associated with variable degrees of duodenal obstruction. This diagnosis is often overlooked in adult patients who present with symptoms suggestive of duodenal obstruction. Imaging evaluation aids in establishing the diagnosis. We evaluated the imaging findings in seven adult patients with known annular pancreas.Seven adult patients with abdominal symptoms had evaluation with one or more of the following imaging studies: upper gastrointestinal (UGI) series, computed tomography (CT), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). All patients underwent subsequent laparotomy as a part of routine care. Surgical and imaging findings were correlated in each patient.UGI series is suitable for demonstrating different degrees of duodenal narrowing at the level of pancreatic annulus. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT is useful in visualizing directly the complete or partial annular pancreatic tissue. ERCP is particularly useful in visualizing the annulus duct coursing around the duodenum.Imaging plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of annular pancreas in adult patients avoiding surgery for confirmation with its associated cost and risks.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000078810300016

    View details for PubMedID 10024406

  • Using CT to reveal fat-containing abnormalities of the pancreas AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Katz, D. S., Hines, J., Math, K. R., Nardi, P. M., Mindelzun, R. E., Lane, M. J. 1999; 172 (2): 393-396

    View details for Web of Science ID 000078197900023

    View details for PubMedID 9930790

  • Diverticulitis of the right colon revisited AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Katz, D. S., Lane, M. J., Ross, B. A., Gold, B. M., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E. 1998; 171 (1): 151-156

    View details for Web of Science ID 000074291000028

    View details for PubMedID 9648779

  • Sonography of intraabdominal gas collections AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Pattison, P., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E., Sommer, F. G. 1997; 169 (6): 1559-1564

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997YH01000018

    View details for PubMedID 9393165

  • Unenhanced helical CT for evaluating acute abdominal pain: A little more cost, a lot more information RADIOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, B. 1997; 205 (1): 43-45

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997XX26600008

    View details for PubMedID 9314959

  • The retropancreatic colon: A congenital anomaly ABDOMINAL IMAGING Estrada, R. L., Mindelzun, R. E. 1997; 22 (4): 426-428

    Abstract

    We report the first case of a retropancreatic colon. This condition appears to be a congenital internal intra-abdominal hernia secondary to abnormal intestinal rotation in the embryo.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997XD11300014

    View details for PubMedID 9157865

  • Still the great mimicker: Abdominal tuberculosis AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Jadvar, H., Mindelzun, R. E., Olcott, E. W., Levitt, D. B. 1997; 168 (6): 1455-1460

    Abstract

    Since the mid 1980s, a resurgence of tuberculosis has occurred. The disease is and will remain a serious public health threat worldwide. The clinical and radiologic features of abdominal tuberculosis may mimic those of many diseases. Radiologists evaluating abdominal images should consider the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis in immigrants from areas endemic for tuberculosis, in immunocompromised patients, and in high-risk patients such as the homeless. Imaging features that suggest the correct diagnosis are cecal amputation, ileocecal thickening and inflammation, shortening of the ascending colon, gaping of the ileocecal valve, mesenteric adenopathy, a misty mesentery, diffuse omental infiltration, loculate high-density ascites, an enhancing peritoneum with or without an omental line, nodularity of the surface of the mesenteric leaves, and transperitoneal permeation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997XA55300013

    View details for PubMedID 9168707

  • Diffuse esophageal glycogenic acanthosis: An endoscopic marker of Cowden's disease AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY KAY, P. S., Soetikno, R. M., Mindelzun, R., Young, H. S. 1997; 92 (6): 1038-1040

    Abstract

    Cowden's disease is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple hamartomas of ectodermal, endodermal, and mesodermal origin affecting many organ systems. Gastrointestinal manifestation includes the formation of multiple polyps of various benign histopathological types throughout the alimentary tract. Recent literature suggests that the frequency of gastrointestinal involvement is approximately 70-85%. The diagnosis of Cowden's disease, however, relies mainly on subtle dermatologic findings, which may not be obvious to the gastroenterologist. We describe a patient with Cowden's disease and review the English literature on the topic of gastrointestinal polyposis and Cowden's disease. These studies suggest that gastrointestinal polyposis is commonly found in this disease, and that diffuse esophageal glycogenic acanthosis is a characteristic feature of Cowden's disease. We propose that the finding of extensive glycogenic acanthosis in the presence of other benign gastrointestinal polyposis should be considered pathognomonic for the diagnosis of Cowden's disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997XC37300027

    View details for PubMedID 9177527

  • Spontaneous intramural small bowel haemorrhage: Importance of non-contrast CT CLINICAL RADIOLOGY Lane, M. J., Katz, D. S., Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B. 1997; 52 (5): 378-380

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abdominal CT findings in patients with spontaneous intramural small bowel haemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT scans of six patients with known intramural small bowel haemorrhage. All of the patients had an underlying coagulopathy. All six patients underwent CT examinations without oral or intravenous contrast media. All six non-contrast CT scans showed hyperattenuation of the involved bowel segments, with thickened and dilated proximal small bowel. Therefore, patients who are clinically at risk for intramural small bowel haemorrhage should undergo a non-contrast CT scan of the abdomen prior to the routine oral and intravenous contrast-enhanced scan. In most cases the non-contrast scan will provide definitive diagnostic information which may not be evident from the contrast-enhanced scan alone.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WY92600009

    View details for PubMedID 9171792

  • Do arterial phase helical CT images improve detection or characterization of colorectal liver metastases? JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED TOMOGRAPHY Chen, I. Y., Katz, D. S., Jeffrey, R. B., Daniel, B. L., Li, K. C., Beaulieu, C. F., Mindelzun, R. E., Yao, D., Olcott, E. W. 1997; 21 (3): 391-397

    Abstract

    Our goal was to determine if arterial phase images from dual phase helical CT improve either the detection or the characterization of hepatic metastases in patients with colorectal carcinoma. Sixty-two patients with known colorectal cancer underwent 65 dual phase helical CT examinations to evaluate for possible liver metastases. Three blinded reviewers independently evaluated the portal venous phase images alone to determine if hepatic metastases were present or absent. Arterial phase images were then analyzed to determine if they identified additional lesions or aided in characterizing small hepatic lesions. Scores of the two methods for diagnosing metastases were compared with the "gold standard" established by a consensus panel of three other radiologists who reviewed all images together with clinical, pathologic, and other imaging data. The addition of arterial phase imaging did not detect any new metastases. However, in 6 of the 64 technically adequate examinations, hepatic arterial phase images increased lesion conspicuity and significantly increased diagnostic confidence when compared with portal vein phase scans alone. In patients with colorectal cancer, the addition of arterial phase imaging does not increase sensitivity, but improves the specificity in diagnosing liver metastases in a small number of cases. Dual phase helical CT does not appear to be indicated in the evaluation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WV86400010

    View details for PubMedID 9135646

  • Tension pneumoperitoneum: Imaging features and therapeutic implications AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Yao, D. C., Loh, N. N., Mindelzun, R. E. 1997; 168 (5): 1389-1390

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WV56800072

    View details for PubMedID 9129463

  • The infraconal compartment: A multidirectional pathway for spread of disease between the extraperitoneal abdomen and pelvis JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED TOMOGRAPHY Beaulieu, C. F., Mindelzun, R. E., Dolph, J., Jeffrey, R. B. 1997; 21 (2): 223-228

    Abstract

    The space below the kidneys where the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces converge has been defined only vaguley in the past. We describe observations on clinical CT cases and studies on cadavers that lead to a refinement in the terminology for this extraperitoneal compartment.Abdominal/pelvic CT scans from 18 patients and the scans of 2 cadavers injected in the femoral region with iodinated contrast material were reviewed concerning the location and distribution of fluid or gas collections relative to the renal fascial enclosure.Pathologic processes involving the anterior or posterior pararenal spaces in addition to the pelvic extraperitoneal spaces were always accompanied by collections in the space below the cone of renal fascia.The term infraconal compartment is a suggested term for the caudal continuation of the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces. This compartment serves as an important multidirectional pathway for the spread of disease between the extraperitoneal abdomen and the pelvis. Fluid collections within this compartment have a characteristic CT appearance.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WM65500010

    View details for PubMedID 9071290

  • The greater omentum AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Sompayrac, S. W., Mindelzun, R. E., Silverman, P. M., Sze, R. 1997; 168 (3): 683-687

    Abstract

    Understanding the embryologic development, anatomic relationships, and pathologic processes of the greater omentum is critical to its complete and proper evaluation. The broad spectrum of imaging findings presented in this essay may allow readers to appreciate features that aid accurate diagnosis of omental disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WJ62800023

    View details for PubMedID 9057515

  • Using biphasic CT to reveal gastrointestinal arteriovenous malformations AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., Beaulieu, C. F. 1997; 168 (2): 437-438

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WD85600026

    View details for PubMedID 9016222

  • Unenhanced helical CT for suspected acute appendicitis AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Lane, M. J., Katz, D. S., Ross, B. A., CLAUTICEENGLE, T. L., Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B. 1997; 168 (2): 405-409

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced helical CT scans in patients with a suspected acute appendicitis.Over a 20-month period, 109 adult patients with suspected acute appendicitis were referred by the emergency department for an unenhanced helical CT scan. Each scan was obtained in a single breath-hold from the T12 vertebral body to the public symphysis using a 5-mm collimation and a pitch of 1.6. No patients were given oral or IV contrast media. The primary CT criteria for diagnosing acute appendicitis was the identification of an appendix with a transverse diameter larger than 6 mm with associated periappendiceal inflammatory changes. The presence of an appendicolith was considered a secondary finding as was isolated periappendiceal inflammation; however, appendicitis was not diagnosed in such patients unless an enlarged appendix was definitely identified. Final diagnoses were established by surgical or clinical follow-up and were compared with the original CT reports.We found 66 true-negatives, 37 true-positives, four false-negatives, and two false-positives that yielded a sensitivity of 90%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 95%, a negative predictive value of 95%, and an accuracy of 94%. An alternative diagnosis was established by an unenhanced helical CT scan in 24 patients (22%), which included cecal diverticulitis (seven patients), urinary tract disease (five patients), adnexal pathology (four patients), sigmoid diverticulitis (two patients), small bowel disease (three patients), right lower quadrant tumor (two patients), and an infected dialysis catheter (one patient).Unenhanced thin-section helical CT is an accurate, effective technique for diagnosing acute appendicitis.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997WD85600020

    View details for PubMedID 9016216

  • The misty mesentery on CT: Differential diagnosis AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B., Lane, M. J., Silverman, P. M. 1996; 167 (1): 61-65

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996UT68400012

    View details for PubMedID 8659422

  • Normal variations in the lateral contour of the head and neck of the pancreas mimicking neoplasm: Evaluation with dual-phase helical CT AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Ross, B. A., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E. 1996; 166 (4): 799-801

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in the lateral contour of the head and neck of the pancreas that can mimic pancreatic masses on CT imaging.We retrospectively reviewed dual-phase helical CT examinations of 119 patients who had no clinical or CT evidence of pancreatic disease. Contour variations of the head and neck of the pancreas were analyzed and were classified according to their anatomic orientation.Forty-one (34.5%) of the 119 patients had discrete lobulations of pancreatic tissue greater than 1 cm lateral to the gastroduodenal or anterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery. These lobulations showed normal pancreatic density on both predominantly arterial and portal venous phase images. Contour variants of the pancreatic head and neck were categorized as three main types: anterior (type I), posterior (type II), and horizontal (type III). In the 119 patients, we found 12 type I variants (10%), 23 type II variants (19%), and six type III variants (5%).Variations in the lateral contour of the normal head and neck of the pancreas are common. Recognition of the different types of contours may help avoid misinterpretation of normal variants as pancreatic masses.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996UB52100010

    View details for PubMedID 8610553

  • Diagnosis of pancreatic injury after blunt abdominal trauma SEMINARS IN ULTRASOUND CT AND MRI Lane, M. J., Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B. 1996; 17 (2): 177-182

    Abstract

    Expeditious diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic injury continues to elude the trauma surgeon and radiologist. Missed or underestimated pancreatic injury is responsible for a high level of morbidity and mortality after blunt or penetrating trauma. Unfortunately, inappropriate therapy can lead to devastating consequences such as severe endocrine or exocrine insufficiency. Abdominal CT is currently the imaging method of choice for evaluating patients with blunt trauma. This article reviews the constellation of CT findings that the radiologist must rely on to establish the diagnosis of pancreatic injury.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996UE62400009

    View details for PubMedID 8845200

  • What radiographic views constitute acute abdominal series? AJR. American journal of roentgenology Mindelzun, R. E., MCCORT, J. J. 1996; 166 (3): 716-717

    View details for PubMedID 8623659

  • SCALP LIPOGRANULOMA DUE TO DERMAL LIPID INJECTIONS - CT AND MR FINDINGS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Hopkins, K. L., Lane, B., ZATZ, L. M., Mindelzun, R. E. 1995; 165 (1): 233-233

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995RE24000087

    View details for PubMedID 7785622

  • CT OF BLUNT TRAUMA TO THE BOWEL AND MESENTERY SEMINARS IN ULTRASOUND CT AND MRI Nghiem, H. V., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E. 1995; 16 (2): 82-90

    Abstract

    Injuries to the bowel and mesentery are found in approximately 5% of all patients undergoing laparotomy after blunt abdominal trauma. Bowel and mesenteric injuries are often subtle and difficult to diagnose, and a delay in the diagnosis is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. CT is the best imaging method for diagnosing injuries to the bowel and mesentery. With meticulous scanning techniques, most significant bowel and mesenteric injuries can be reliably identified with CT preoperatively, and associated injuries to other abdominal viscera can be confirmed.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995QU72000002

    View details for PubMedID 7794607

  • Mid-small-bowel obstruction. AJR. American journal of roentgenology Mindelzun, R. E. 1995; 164 (1): 255-256

    View details for PubMedID 7998552

  • CT DIAGNOSIS OF BLUNT PANCREATIC TRAUMA - IMPORTANCE OF DETECTING FLUID BETWEEN THE PANCREAS AND THE SPLENIC VEIN AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Lane, M. J., Mindelzun, R. E., Sandhu, J. S., MCCORMICK, V. D., Jeffrey, R. B. 1994; 163 (4): 833-835

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of detecting fluid between the splenic vein and the pancreas on CT scans in the diagnosis of pancreatic injury after blunt abdominal trauma.We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT scans of 10 patients with surgical- or autopsy-proved pancreatic injury after blunt abdominal trauma. The finding of fluid interdigitating between the pancreas and the splenic vein was then studied along with the reported CT features of pancreatic injury. These included intraperitoneal fluid, fluid in the lesser sac, extraperitoneal fluid, pancreatic edema or hematoma, and thickening of the anterior renal fascia.The CT scans of all 10 patients reviewed showed abnormalities suggesting pancreatic injury. Only 40% of patients showed all of the findings reported in the literature. Fluid interdigitating between the splenic vein and the pancreatic parenchyma was seen on CT scans in 90%.Our experience suggests that fluid between the splenic vein and the pancreas is a helpful CT finding for the diagnosis of pancreatic injury after blunt abdominal trauma. This finding was easy to recognize and in the proper clinical setting directs attention to additional subtle findings of pancreatic injury.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PH68300013

    View details for PubMedID 7503824

  • DIFFERENTIATING SIGMOID DIVERTICULITIS FROM CARCINOMA ON CT SCANS - MESENTERIC INFLAMMATION SUGGESTS DIVERTICULITIS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY PADIDAR, A. M., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E., DOLPH, J. F. 1994; 163 (1): 81-83

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of two specific CT signs of sigmoid mesenteric inflammation (fluid at the root of the mesentery and vascular engorgement) for identifying and differentiating sigmoid diverticulitis from carcinoma.CT scans of 69 patients with surgically proved sigmoid diverticulitis were retrospectively reviewed and compared with CT findings in 29 patients with surgically proved sigmoid carcinoma. Two specific patterns of inflammation of the sigmoid mesentery were analyzed: fluid at the root of the sigmoid mesentery and engorgement of the sigmoid mesenteric vessels.The CT findings were present more often in patients with sigmoid diverticulitis than in those with carcinoma (p < .001). Fluid at the base of the mesentery had a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value for diverticulitis of 36%, 90%, and 89% respectively. Vascular engorgement alone had a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 29%, 100%, and 100%, respectively.Our results suggest that CT findings of fluid at the root of the mesentery and vascular engorgement are useful in distinguishing sigmoid diverticulitis from carcinoma of the sigmoid.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994QE28600016

    View details for PubMedID 8010253

  • CT OF BLUNT TRAUMA TO THE BOWEL AND MESENTERY AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Nghiem, H. V., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R. E. 1993; 160 (1): 53-58

    Abstract

    The high mortality and morbidity rates associated with traumatic rupture of the hollow viscera have been attributed to the clinical difficulty in establishing an early diagnosis. CT has been shown to be accurate for detecting bowel and mesenteric injuries caused by blunt trauma and may be useful in predicting the need for either surgical repair or conservative management. However, many major gastrointestinal injuries have subtle CT findings. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate the broad spectrum of gastrointestinal abnormalities that can be shown by CT in patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993KF47700012

    View details for PubMedID 8416646

  • Acute abdomen, practical alimentary tract radiol Mosby Year Book Federle MP, McCort JJ, Mindelzun RE 1993
  • Radiology of the diaphragm and the lesser sac Current Practice of Radiol. B.C. Decker Mindelzun RE, McCort JJ, Mindelzun RE 1993
  • INTRAPANCREATIC ACCESSORY SPLEEN MIMICKING PANCREATIC MASS ON CT JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED TOMOGRAPHY HAYWARD, I., Mindelzun, R. E., Jeffrey, R. B. 1992; 16 (6): 984-985

    Abstract

    Accessory spleens occur in approximately 10% of the population and are usually located in the region of the splenic hilum. In 16% of patients the accessory spleen will be located within the pancreatic tail. The diagnosis of an intrapancreatic accessory spleen can be suggested when CT, with and without intravenous contrast agent, demonstrates that the mass enhances in a manner identical to the spleen.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JY18700030

    View details for PubMedID 1430454

  • MUCOCELE OF THE APPENDIX - IMAGING FINDINGS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY MADWED, D., Mindelzun, R., Jeffrey, R. B. 1992; 159 (1): 69-72

    Abstract

    Mucocele of the appendix, a cystic mass resulting from a dilated appendiceal lumen caused by abnormal accumulation of mucus, is a rare entity that often is not considered when problems of the right lower quadrant are assessed. Preoperative recognition of mucocele of the appendix is important because of the possibility of rupture at surgery with development of pseudomyxoma peritonei and to predict malignant transformation. The appearances of mucoceles of the appendix on sonography, CT, and barium studies are illustrated.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JA20000018

    View details for PubMedID 1609724

  • GASTRIC BEZOAR CAUSED BY LECITHIN - AN UNUSUAL COMPLICATION OF HEALTH FADDISM AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY Hsu, H. H., Grove, W. E., MINDULZUN, R., Knauer, C. M. 1992; 87 (6): 794-796

    Abstract

    We discovered an unusual bezoar in a previously healthy man who had been ingesting large amounts of a vegetable-derived oil touted to contain lecithin, which he purchased from health food stores in the belief that it had beneficial effects in lowering cholesterol levels and improving memory. The large intragastric mass, composed of fatty acids and lecithin, led to considerable morbidity, including abdominal pain, early satiety, and significant weight loss, and required surgical removal.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HX18000025

    View details for PubMedID 1590324

  • VOLVULUS OF THE SPLENIC FLEXURE - RADIOGRAPHIC FEATURES RADIOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., Stone, J. M. 1991; 181 (1): 221-223

    Abstract

    Six cases of splenic flexure volvulus were studied over a 14-year period. The patients were aged 15-62 years. Five of the six patients were mentally retarded, lifelong residents of a long-term-care institution. Two patients had congenital absence of normal colonic attachments; the other four patients had elongated mesocolons, presumably from chronic constipation. All patients underwent abdominal radiography, followed by a barium enema study. In the appropriate clinical setting, radiographic diagnosis of a splenic flexure volvulus is suggested when the following are seen: (a) a markedly dilated, air-filled colon wtih an abrupt termination at the anatomic splenic flexure; (b) two widely separated air-fluid levels, one in the transverse colon and the other in the cecum; (c) an empty descending and sigmoid colon; and (d) a characteristic beak at the anatomic splenic flexure at a barium enema examination.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GF73600043

    View details for PubMedID 1887035

  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY AS AN ADJUNCT TO ULTRASOUND IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE ACALCULOUS CHOLECYSTITIS GASTROINTESTINAL RADIOLOGY Blankenberg, F., Wirth, R., Jeffrey, R. B., Mindelzun, R., Francis, I. 1991; 16 (2): 149-153

    Abstract

    The sonographic and computed tomographic (CT) findings were reviewed in 17 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) over a 6-year period from 1984 to 1989. Of the six patients in whom both ultrasound and CT were performed, CT revealed marked gallbladder (GB) wall abnormalities, including perforation, and pericholecystic fluid collections in five patients not demonstrated by sonography. Of the total group, five patients had GB wall thicknesses of less than or equal to 3 mm (normal) at pathologic examination, which demonstrated a spectrum of disease ranging from acute hemorrhagic/necrotizing, to gangrenous acalculous cholecystitis with perforation. Sonography was falsely negative or significantly underestimated the severity of AAC in seven of the 13 patients examined by sonography. CT because of its superior ability to assess pericholecystic inflammation may provide additional diagnostic information even after a thorough sonographic study in cases of AAC.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991EX38300014

    View details for PubMedID 2016029

  • DEBUNKING BARIUM APPENDICITIS WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE MCCORT, J. J., Mindelzun, R. E. 1988; 149 (4): 464-464

    View details for Web of Science ID A1988Q388400023

    View details for PubMedID 3227693

  • GAS IN THE PSOAS MUSCLE SECONDARY TO AN INTRAVERTEBRAL VACUUM CLEFT - CT CHARACTERISTICS JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED TOMOGRAPHY VANBOCKEL, S. R., Mindelzun, R. E. 1987; 11 (5): 913-915

    Abstract

    Gas within the psoas muscle is usually due to primary or secondary infection necessitating aggressive therapy. We report a case of gas within the psoas muscle due to an intravertebral vacuum cleft, a benign manifestation of vertebral body necrosis. Identification of such a cleft in the proper clinical setting makes invasive evaluation unnecessary.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1987J992600037

    View details for PubMedID 3655063

  • ADULT HIRSCHPRUNG DISEASE - RADIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS RADIOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., Hicks, S. M. 1986; 160 (3): 623-625

    Abstract

    Hirschprung disease is usually diagnosed in infancy. Occasionally patients reach adulthood without diagnosis or treatment. Four cases of adult Hirschprung disease are described. The principal radiographic findings are a markedly dilated, feces-filled colon above the zone of transition; a narrowed rectum; a cone- or funnel-shaped zone of transition; and a mosaic colonic pattern caused by collapsed redundant mucosa after colonic cleansing. In an adult, identification on a barium enema examination of an abrupt, smooth transition zone in the rectum with proximal colonic dilatation, in conjunction with an appropriate clinical history, should suggest the diagnosis of adult Hirschprung disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986D674000009

    View details for PubMedID 3737900

  • THE CUPOLA SIGN OF PNEUMOPERITONEUM IN THE SUPINE PATIENT GASTROINTESTINAL RADIOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., MCCORT, J. J. 1986; 11 (3): 283-285

    Abstract

    Free air within the peritoneal cavity can be recognized on supine abdominal films by identification of the median subphrenic space. We have termed this the "cupola sign." In a review of 100 patients with pneumoperitoneum, this sign was seen in 6 patients. In 3 instances it was the only manifestation of a pneumoperitoneum and in 3 instances it was seen in association with air below the right and left diaphragmatic leaves.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986C613500016

    View details for PubMedID 3743953

  • UPPER ABDOMINAL-TRAUMA - CONVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY SEMINARS IN ROENTGENOLOGY Mindelzun, R. E., MCCORT, J. J. 1984; 19 (4): 259-268

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984TM56000004

    View details for PubMedID 6333728

  • LESSER SAC PNEUMOPERITONEUM SECONDARY TO PERFORATION OF THE INTRAABDOMINAL ESOPHAGUS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ROENTGENOLOGY Healy, M. E., Mindelzun, R. E. 1984; 142 (2): 325-326

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SB40700018

    View details for PubMedID 6607600

  • HEPATIC AND PERI-HEPATIC RADIOLUCENCIES RADIOLOGIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Mindelzun, R., MCCORT, J. J. 1980; 18 (2): 221-238

    Abstract

    Radiolucencies in and around the liver may be caused by normal or abnormal accumulations of fat or gas. Computed tomography, which measures the differential photon absorption of tissue more accurately than does abdominal radiography, readily demonstrates interfaces between the liver and air or fat. The correlation of these two modalities in detecting and identifying hepatic radiolucencies is explored.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980LC90300006

    View details for PubMedID 7208861

  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY IN ACUTE PYELONEPHRITIS ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETES RADIOLOGY Hoffman, E. P., Mindelzun, R. E., Anderson, R. U. 1980; 135 (3): 691-695

    Abstract

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in four diabetic patients with gram-negative pyelonephritis are described. Excretory urography with tomography was performed in three patients, with normal results. Linear areas of low denisty which were observed on the CT scans corroborate previous reports, and the authors suggest that CT may be more sensitive than conventional techniques in the detection of infectious renal parenchymal disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980JU31400027

    View details for PubMedID 7384456

  • MEDIASTINAL BRONCHOGENIC CYST WITH ESOPHAGEAL COMMUNICATION RADIOLOGY Mindelzun, R., Long, P. 1978; 126 (1): 28-28

    View details for Web of Science ID A1978EF32400005

    View details for PubMedID 619429

  • A method for the simultaneous measurement of 67 Ga, 111 In, and 75 Se in tumors using a semiconductor detector. Journal of nuclear medicine HIGASI, T., Kanno, M., Kurihara, H., Mindelzun, R. E. 1972; 13 (8): 624-626

    View details for PubMedID 5041639

  • ECTOPIC (INTRAPELVIC) RENAL PAPILLA JOURNAL OF UROLOGY Schwartz, B. B., MINDELZU, R. E. 1972; 108 (1): 28-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1972M901200009

    View details for PubMedID 5034011

  • SKELETAL CHANGES IN WILSONS DISEASE . A RADIOLOGICAL STUDY RADIOLOGY MINDELZU, R., Elkin, M., SCHEINBE, I. H., STERNLIE, I. 1970; 94 (1): 127-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970E911400021

    View details for PubMedID 5410330

  • DIAGNOSIS OF AORTIC ANEURYSM WITH RADIONUCLIDE ANGIOGRAPHY AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY Freeman, L. M., MINDELZU, R. 1968; 116 (3): 433-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968B662900032

    View details for PubMedID 5675917

Conference Proceedings


  • Clinical presentation of mucin secreting tumors of the pancreas Tibayan, F., Vierra, M., Mindelzun, B., TSANG, D., McClenathan, J., Young, H., Trueblood, H. W. EXCERPTA MEDICA INC-ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC. 2000: 349-351

    Abstract

    Pancreatitis and jaundice secondary to ductal obstruction are common in intraductal papillary mucinous tumors (IPMT) of the pancreas. However, the incidence and severity of the complications of obstruction are not well documented. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical presentation and outcome of 10 patients with IPMT.All cases of IPMT diagnosed between 1994 and 1999 were reviewed.Four of the 10 patients developed severe acute illness with systemic complications resulting from ductal obstruction. Three suffered acute cholangitis with sepsis, and 1 developed necrotizing pancreatitis and ARDS. There was 1 postoperative death in a patient with adenocarcinoma. All other patients are alive and well with a median follow-up of 26 months (survival 90%).Pancreatic or common bile duct obstruction in IPMT may result in acute, life-threatening disease. Aggressive surgical therapy is warranted before development of complications of ductal obstruction or progression of tumor occurs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000088620800002

    View details for PubMedID 10930477

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