Bio

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


RETIRED in 2008, do not conduct research

Publications

All Publications


  • Do capacitively coupled electric fields accelerate tibial stress fracture healing? A randomized controlled trial AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE Beck, B. R., Matheson, G. O., Bergman, G., Norling, T., Fredericson, M., Hoffman, A. R., Marcus, R. 2008; 36 (3): 545-553

    Abstract

    Tibial stress fractures increasingly affect athletes and military recruits, with few known effective management options. Electrical stimulation enhances regular fracture healing, but the effect on stress fractures has not been definitively tested.Capacitively coupled electric field stimulation will accelerate tibial stress fracture healing.Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.Twenty men and 24 women with acute posteromedial tibial stress fractures were referred from local clinicians. Subjects were randomly assigned active or placebo capacitively coupled electric field stimulation to be applied for 15 hours per day until healed, given supplemental calcium, and instructed to rest from provocative training. Healing was confirmed when hopping to 10 cm for 30 seconds could be achieved without pain.No difference in time to healing was detected between treatment and placebo groups. Women in the treatment group healed more slowly than did the men (P = .05). Superior treatment compliance was associated with reduced time to healing (P = .003). Rest noncompliance was associated with increased time to healing (P = .05).Whole-group analysis did not detect an effect of capacitively coupled electric field stimulation on tibial stress fracture healing; however, greater device use and less weightbearing loading enhanced the effectiveness of the active device. More severe stress fractures healed more quickly with capacitively coupled electric field stimulation.Although the use of capacitively coupled electric field stimulation for tibial stress fracture healing may not be efficacious for all, it may be indicated for the more severely injured or elite athlete/recruit whose incentive to return to activity may motivate superior compliance.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0363546507310076

    View details for Web of Science ID 000253374000016

    View details for PubMedID 18055921

  • Post-menopausal osteoporosis BEST PRACTICE & RESEARCH IN CLINICAL OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY Marcus, R. 2002; 16 (3): 309-327

    View details for DOI 10.1053/beog.2002.0284

    View details for Web of Science ID 000176948000006

    View details for PubMedID 12099665

  • Role of exercise in preventing and treating osteoporosis RHEUMATIC DISEASE CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Marcus, R. 2001; 27 (1): 131-?

    Abstract

    Bone mass at any time of life reflects the totality of events that have impinged on the skeleton to that point. For adults, these events include those that have influenced the acquisition of bone during years of growth, resulting in the achievement of skeletal maturity, or "peak bone mass," as well as those that have subsequently influenced bone losses. For each limb of this trajectory, physical activity has been implicated as a powerful and independent factor. This article reviews current evidence regarding the relation of habitual physical activity to bone acquisition and maintenance, the skeletal consequences of exercise training, and the clinical value of exercise for patients with skeletal frailty.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000167685100007

    View details for PubMedID 11285991

  • Use of estrogen for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis ENDOCRINE Marcus, R. 1997; 6 (2): 207-211

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997XB14300016

    View details for PubMedID 9225138

  • OVERVIEW OF EXERCISE AND BONE MASS RHEUMATIC DISEASE CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Bouxsein, M. L., Marcus, R. 1994; 20 (3): 787-802

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PC56000015

    View details for PubMedID 7984790

  • EFFECTS OF GROWTH-HORMONE IN OLDER-PEOPLE Marcus, R., Holloway, L., Butterfield, G. E. SPRINGER-VERLAG. 1994: 150-154
  • CHRONIC ATYPICAL SEIZURE DISORDER AND CATARACTS DUE TO DELAYED DIAGNOSIS OF PSEUDOHYPOPARATHYROIDISM WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE FAIG, J. C., Kalinyak, J., Marcus, R., Feldman, D. 1992; 157 (1): 64-65

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JD51600012

    View details for PubMedID 1413750

  • OSTEOPOROSIS AND EXERCISE IN WOMEN MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE Marcus, R., Drinkwater, B., DALSKY, G., Dufek, J., Raab, D., Slemenda, C., SNOWHARTER, C. 1992; 24 (6): S301-S307

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HX75400013

    View details for PubMedID 1625555

  • UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING OSTEOPOROSIS HOSPITAL PRACTICE Marcus, R. 1989; 24 (4): 189-?

    Abstract

    Although age-related bone loss due to remodeling is basically a normal, predictable phenomenon, it is one that may be accelerated, at times quite dramatically, by dietary factors, hormonal insufficiency, or lack of exercise. Recent data regarding the long-term prophylactic efficacy of calcium supplementation, estrogen replacement therapy, and exercise are evaluated.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1989U131700016

    View details for PubMedID 2538489

  • NUTRITIONAL MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES MEDICAL CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Reaven, G. M., Coulston, A. M., Marcus, R. A. 1979; 63 (5): 927-943

    View details for Web of Science ID A1979JD11500003

    View details for PubMedID 388113