Bio

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Emile Holman Professor of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine (1964 - Present)
  • Chairman Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine (1963 - 1974)

Honors & Awards


  • Phi Beta Kappa, University of New Hampshire (1970)
  • Alpha Omega Alpha, Yale School of Medicine (1947)
  • Dedication of Robert A. Chase Hand Center, Stanford University Medical Center (2002)
  • Honored Member, American Association of Plastic Surgeons (1991)
  • Honored Member, Association of Clinical Anatomy (1991)
  • Pettee Award as Outstanding Alumnus, University of New Hampshire (1998)
  • Albion WalterHewlett Award, Stanford University School of Medicine (1991)
  • Golden Apple Award, California Medical Association (1991)
  • Henry J. Kaiser Award for Innovation in Teaching, Stanford University School of Medicine (1978,77,80,81.86,90,91)
  • Francis Gilman Blake Award, Yale University School of Medicine (1962)

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Science, University of New Hampshire, Medicine (1994)
  • M.D., Yale School of Medicine, Medicine (1947)
  • B.S. cum laude, University New Hampshire, Pre Medicine (1945)

Community and International Work


  • B.K. Rank Visiting Professor, Australia & New Zealand

    Topic

    Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Australasian College of Surgeons

    Populations Served

    Australia & New Zealand

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Visiting Professor, Riad, Saudi Arabia

    Topic

    Reconstructive Surgery

    Partnering Organization(s)

    King Faisel Hospital

    Populations Served

    Saudi citizens

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Visiting Professor, South Africa

    Topic

    Reconstructive Surgery

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Chamber of Mines

    Populations Served

    Mine Workers

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Visiting Surgeon, Vellore South India

    Topic

    Reconstructive Surgery

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Vellore Christian Medical College

    Populations Served

    South India

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Research in teaching technology
Computer assisted teaching programs

Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • LUCY: A 3-D pelvic model for surgical simulation JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF GYNECOLOGIC LAPAROSCOPISTS Heinrichs, W. L., Srivastava, S., Dev, P., Chase, R. A. 2004; 11 (3): 326-331

    Abstract

    Development of 3-D models of human anatomy for use in virtual reality simulators is anticipated to enhance surgical training. These models may be a valuable resource for gaining mastery of minimal-access procedures. The pelvis portion (hip to upper-thigh) of a 32-year-old female cadaver was frozen and sectioned axially in approximately 2-mm increments as the first step in producing an accurately representative 3-D model of the human female pelvis. Photographic exposures of the entire series of 95 sections were then converted to digital format. Adobe PhotoShop masks for each structure were created and converted into wire-frame and surface-textured models; this aggregate model set was named "LUCY." To date, 3-D representations of 40 pelvic structures (over 2200 individual masks) have been modeled In conjunction with haptic technology, these virtual anatomic models will enable users to practice fundamental surgical manipulations and procedures such as tubal ligation and ovariectomy. The deployment of surgical-simulation models such as LUCY may facilitate technical-performance aspects of surgical training, particularly those associated with minimal-access procedures. Manipulations and procedures can be practiced over the Internet, providing a host of flexible options to enhance the surgical curricula.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223752600008

    View details for PubMedID 15559342

  • Vesalius and Calcar. The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha Chase, R. A. 1996; 59 (3): 43-?

    View details for PubMedID 9074322

  • Medical education and the National Boards. The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha Chase, R. A. 1992; 55 (2): 43-?

    View details for PubMedID 1603833

  • RUMINATIONS OF A TEACHING SURGEON WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Chase, R. A. 1992; 156 (3): 314-315

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HJ56900024

    View details for PubMedID 1595264

  • GROSS-ANATOMY IN MEDICAL-EDUCATION AMERICAN SURGEON Beahrs, O. H., Chase, R. A., Ger, R. 1986; 52 (5): 227-232

    Abstract

    The present state of human gross anatomy in medical education can generally be characterized as the presentation of a large bolus of information that is swallowed and only partly digested during the first year of medical school. The subject is often taught in a depth beyond that which would be relevant to all physicians irrespective of their future professional careers. This condition has resulted from adaptive adjustments to the escalating discrepancy between a rapidly expanding knowledge base in science and technology and the relatively fixed time period for education of a physician. Initially, traditional courses retained their comprehensive character, and new information was simply piled on top of existing departmental offerings. It soon became obvious that there would have to be a reduction in time devoted to established courses and a reciprocal expansion of time to accommodate newly developing sciences. Such adjustments were painful and often led to conflicts about what comprises essential knowledge in medical education. Thus, the curriculum time devoted to human gross anatomy has been significantly reduced to accommodate new knowledge in cellular and sub-cellular structures and other disciplines. That common foundation of knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes essential to all physicians regardless of specialty is ever-changing and often debated by medical school faculty members. However, two facts are generally agreed upon: that today's medical student with a broad but perhaps thin base in science and limited direct clinical experience is not competent upon graduation to assume patient care responsibilities without supervision and that as a result, the formal education of a physician has expanded into the graduate domain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986C307200001

    View details for PubMedID 3706911

  • SKIN AND SOFT-TISSUE COVERAGE - RETROSPECTIVE CLINICS IN PLASTIC SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1986; 13 (2): 195-203

    Abstract

    The transfer of autogenous tissues in man has its origins in antiquity. Movement of composite tissues using pedicle techniques, which assured that such tissues were never deprived of vital blood supply, preceded free grafting. The ultimate refinement of carrying pedicles was reached in the vascularized island pedicle flap, which carried composite tissues solely on an intact vascular leash. An enormous increase in the versatility of composite transfers occurred when microvascular surgery made transfer with immediate vascularization a reliable procedure. This opened the door to free functioning muscle and musculocutaneous transfers with motor reinnervation at the recipient site--the supreme tissue transfers.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1986C056000004

    View details for PubMedID 3516515

  • Historical review of skin and soft tissue coverage of the upper extremity. Hand clinics Chase, R. A. 1985; 1 (4): 599-608

    Abstract

    This review recounts the known historical development of techniques to achieve soft tissue coverage using free skin grafts, pedicle flaps of various types, and composite tissue transfers with immediate revascularization. There is documentation of an incremental emphasis on muscle-containing pedicle flaps and free revascularized composite tissue transfers in the world literature.

    View details for PubMedID 3913677

  • THE DEVELOPMENT OF TISSUE TRANSFER IN HAND SURGERY JOURNAL OF HAND SURGERY-AMERICAN VOLUME Chase, R. A. 1984; 9A (4): 463-477
  • COSTS, RISKS, AND BENEFITS OF HAND SURGERY JOURNAL OF HAND SURGERY-AMERICAN VOLUME Chase, R. A. 1983; 8 (5): 644-648

    Abstract

    The major criticism of all medicine today is spiraling cost of health care. This is fanned in intensity by economists, politicians, and social scientists who add up the costs, which, in fact, have skyrocketed, and they have concluded that it "isn't worth it." The major basis for that conclusion is that despite the fact that health care costs are gobbling up 11% of the gross national product (+189 billion), there has been an increase in life expectancy of only 1 year. Use of life expectancy as the outcome measure is simple-minded, misleading, and inappropriate, and it is used only because the objective data are clear-cut and available. Mortality is a clear endpoint. Some of the greatest advances in medicine and all of those in the field of hand surgery have nothing to do with duration of survival (quantity of life), but contribute with major impact to the productivity, adjustment, and self-satisfaction of patients (quality of life). We have the opportunity to challenge and counter some of the adverse public image that is the current portrait of all of medicine. Much of that image is based on flimsy, inaccurate data that are extrapolated into gross untruth by nonmedical, short-sighted adversaries. Hand surgeons must collect objective evidence of the rehabilitation benefits of hand surgery care to persons suffering deformity and associated disability. Such data may be extrapolated to show the true cost-risk-benefit ratios produced by hand surgeons.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RK51500006

    View details for PubMedID 6415154

  • BELABORING A PRINCIPLE ANNALS OF PLASTIC SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1983; 11 (3): 255-260

    View details for Web of Science ID A1983RG05200016

    View details for PubMedID 6638827

  • PRECURSORS TO THE ADVANCES IN PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Chase, R. A. 1982; 136 (1): 58-58

    View details for Web of Science ID A1982MX95800022

    View details for PubMedID 18749015

  • The Stanford integrated plastic surgery program--history and philosophy. Annals of plastic surgery Chase, R. A. 1981; 7 (2): 97-98

    View details for PubMedID 7294666

  • PAPER-AND-PENCIL EXAMINATIONS - WHAT THEY CAN AND CANNOT DO SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1981; 89 (6): 771-772

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981LT11100021

    View details for PubMedID 7245040

  • THE TREATMENT OF CONTRACTURES OF THE HAND USING SELF-HYPNOSIS JOURNAL OF HAND SURGERY-AMERICAN VOLUME Spiegel, D., Chase, R. A. 1980; 5 (5): 428-432

    Abstract

    The successful treatment of a man with severe posttraumatic contractures of the hand using a combined psychological and physical rehabilitation approach is reported. The contractures had functional and organic components, as did the treatment, which involved teaching the patient self-hypnosis exercises and the use of a splint. The patient obtained virtually complete return of movement after 3 1/2 years of total disability. The importance of identifying and mobilizing rather than challenging the patient's motivation for recovery using a rehabilitation approach is discussed. Hypnosis can facilitate recovery in such psychosomatic disorders in patients with the requisite hypnotic capacity and motivation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980KH98900003

    View details for PubMedID 7430579

  • A DYNAMIC MYOCUTANEOUS FLAP FOR HAND RECONSTRUCTION JOURNAL OF HAND SURGERY-AMERICAN VOLUME Chase, R. A., Hentz, V. R., APFELBERG, D. 1980; 5 (6): 594-599

    Abstract

    Relocation of functional units by neurovascular pedicle transfer is firmly established in reconstructive hand surgery. Transfer of muscle and overlying skin, the myocutaneous flap, to provide skin cover is equally established. The dynamic myocutaneous flap is an extension of these concepts. Injection studies confirmed that the abductor digiti quinti muscle and its overlying hypothenar skin could be transferred on its neurovascular bundle. This dynamic myocutaneous flap was used to reconstruct both skin cover and functional opposition following resection of an arteriovenous malformation involving the thumb. Other clinical applications would include reconstruction of thenar skin and muscle lost secondary to electrical burns, avulsion, or tumor resection.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1980KR83300016

    View details for PubMedID 7430605

  • How U.S. law affects FMGs. Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons Chase, R. A. 1979; 64 (6): 4-7

    View details for PubMedID 10241566

  • SURGICAL TRANSPLANTATION OF WARTS PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY NOE, J. M., Chase, R. A. 1979; 64 (1): 101-103

    View details for Web of Science ID A1979HB61700023

    View details for PubMedID 451057

  • Validity of certification--will the feds believe us? Federation bulletin / Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States Chase, R. A. 1978; 65 (6): 163-171

    View details for PubMedID 10308134

  • Unnecessary surgery. Annals of plastic surgery Chase, R. A. 1978; 1 (1): 12-13

    View details for PubMedID 727649

  • Taking action on physician incompetence. The Hospital medical staff Chase, R. A. 1977; 6 (10): 18-25

    View details for PubMedID 10236453

  • A noble catalyst dies. Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons Chase, R. A. 1977; 62 (6): 28-29

    View details for PubMedID 10236139

  • REEXAMINATION-RECERTIFICATION - MEASUREMENT OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE AND RELATION TO QUALITY OF MEDICAL-CARE ARCHIVES OF SURGERY Chase, R. A., Burg, F. D. 1977; 112 (1): 19-25

    Abstract

    Over the past half decade, there has been an increment in forces moving the profession toward recertification and a decrement in the restraining forces. The whole process will be catalyzed by available funding through grants to implement continuing medical education, development of performance-, and competency-based assessment measures and recertification. Specialty boards serving relatively small numbers of candidates have serious difficulty funding certification, to say nothing of recertification. An adequate mechanism to implement recertification can emerge only from the profession itself, working through the American Board of Medical Specialties and specialty boards. The means to discharge this responsibility should, at the outset, come from public and private sources. Eventually the system may become self-supporting through evaluation and certification fees. The public interest will be best served when there are adequate mechanisms to assess continuing competence of all physicians. As a minimum, there must be a system to guard against incompetence through obsolescence of any of the practicing professionals.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1977CS19600003

    View details for PubMedID 831670

  • Letter: Specialty boards. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association Chase, R. A. 1976; 236 (11): 1236-1237

    View details for PubMedID 989062

  • Letter: Excessive specialization. New England journal of medicine Chase, R. A. 1976; 294 (23): 1297-1298

    View details for PubMedID 1264166

  • [Accurate reconstruction of traumatic bony contour defects of periobital area with prefabricated silastic]. Zentralblatt für Chirurgie Laub, D. R., Spohn, W., Lash, H., Weber, J., Chase, R. A. 1976; 101 (12): 738-743

    Abstract

    The silicone inlay method of prefabricating subcutaneous and bony implants for congenital and acquired defects of the maxillofacial area was used in 25 cases. Heat vulcanized Silastic 372 or 373 was used, and seems to be satisfactory. The method is presented as a useful addition to the surgical restoration of subcutaneous and bony defects, particularly complex contours of the periorbital area when autogenous tissue is unavailable. Complications seem to be less common when the implant is immobile and secured to bone. The method is evolving, and modifications can and should be made in the technique.

    View details for PubMedID 952115

  • Sounding board: Role of the autopsy in the teaching of gross anatomy. New England journal of medicine Castleman, B., Chase, R. A., RANCHOD, M. 1974; 291 (26): 1413-1414

    View details for PubMedID 4427647

  • SURGICAL MANPOWER - SYMPOSIUM ARCHIVES OF SURGERY Chase, R. A., Moore, F. D., ANLYAN, W. G., Warren, R., DUVAL, M. K. 1974; 108 (5): 637-653

    View details for Web of Science ID A1974S903900001

    View details for PubMedID 4829783

  • Tendon injuries. Proceedings of the Mine Medical Officers' Association Chase, R. A. 1972; 51 (411): 14-15

    View details for PubMedID 4656992

  • Treatment of acute hand injuries. Proceedings of the Mine Medical Officers' Association Chase, R. A. 1972; 51 (411): 9-14

    View details for PubMedID 4656998

  • SURGERY OF HAND .1. NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Chase, R. A. 1972; 287 (23): 1174-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1972O142600004

    View details for PubMedID 4563083

  • Wound healing of skin flaps rotated into delayed or primary recipient sites. Surgical forum Hentz, V. R., Commons, G. W., Ascough, B. D., Laub, D. R., Chase, R. A. 1972; 23 (0): 34-36

    View details for PubMedID 4601069

  • SURGERY OF HAND .2. NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Chase, R. A. 1972; 287 (24): 1227-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1972O194000005

    View details for PubMedID 4344655

  • SURGICAL WORK LOADS SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1972; 71 (3): 475-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1972L813800028

    View details for PubMedID 5010233

  • OXYGEN-TENSION AND WOUND-HEALING SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1972; 71 (1): 150-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1972L273800028

    View details for PubMedID 5007578

  • WHO SHOULD PAY FOR GRADUATE SURGICAL EDUCATION - VIEWS OF SURGICAL EDUCATOR SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1971; 70 (4): 506-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1971K421700005

    View details for PubMedID 5099435

  • EARLY SALVAGE IN ACUTE HAND INJURIES WITH A PRIMARY ISLAND FLAP PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1971; 48 (6): 521-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1971K973800001

    View details for PubMedID 4946645

  • GRADUATE TRAINING AND TEACHING PHYSICIAN REIMBURSEMENT SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1971; 70 (4): 551-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1971K421700016

    View details for PubMedID 5099444

  • SURGICAL COUNCIL AND BASIC SURGICAL EXAMINATION JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Chase, R. A. 1971; 218 (9): 1412-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1971K886100004

    View details for PubMedID 5171326

  • The restrictive pharyngeal flap. British journal of plastic surgery Weber, J., Chase, R. A., JOBE, R. P. 1970; 23 (4): 347-351

    View details for PubMedID 5475761

  • Stress velopharyngeal incompetence in an oboe player. Cleft palate journal Weber, J., Chase, R. A. 1970; 7: 858-861

    View details for PubMedID 5273877

  • Palmar-shelf arthroplasty of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis. A report of nine cases. journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume Albright, J. A., Chase, R. A. 1970; 52 (5): 896-906

    View details for PubMedID 5479479

  • EVALUATION OF MUSCLE STIMULATION IN REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH HYPERNASAL SPEECH PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Weber, J., JOBE, R. P., Chase, R. A. 1970; 46 (2): 173-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970G906400012

    View details for PubMedID 5423484

  • IM AGAINST A RIGID CORE CURRICULUM PRIOR TO SPECIALTY TRAINING IN PLASTIC SURGERY PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1970; 46 (4): 384-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970H421500011

    View details for PubMedID 5484896

  • REHABILITATION BEGINS WITH INITIAL CARE JOURNAL OF TRAUMA Chase, R. A. 1970; 10 (11): 958-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970H935000009

    View details for PubMedID 5478033

  • Reconstructive procedures after irreversible nerve damage in the upper extremity. Clinical neurosurgery Chase, R. A. 1970; 17: 142-159

    View details for PubMedID 4939479

  • CORE KNOWLEDGE PRINCIPLE AND EROSION OF SPECIALTY BARRIERS IN SURGICAL TRAINING ANNALS OF SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1970; 171 (6): 987-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970G568500021

    View details for PubMedID 5420941

  • SEVERELY INJURED UPPER LIMB - TO AMPUTATE OR RECONSTRUCT - THAT IS QUESTION ARCHIVES OF SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1970; 100 (4): 382-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970F919700011

    View details for PubMedID 4906821

  • TRAUMA WORKSHOP REPORT - LONG-RANGE MANAGEMENT AND REHABILITATION JOURNAL OF TRAUMA Chase, R. A., Feldman, D. J. 1970; 10 (11): 1055-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970H935000024

    View details for PubMedID 5478015

  • ACCURATE RECONSTRUCTION OF TRAUMATIC BONY CONTOUR DEFFECTS OF PERIORBITAL AREA WITH PREFABRICATED SILASTIC JOURNAL OF TRAUMA Laub, D. R., Spohn, W., Lash, H., Weber, J., Chase, R. A. 1970; 10 (6): 472-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1970G450500005

    View details for PubMedID 5446085

  • Rehabilitation of the forgotten cleft child. Rehabilitation record Chase, R. A., JOBE, R. P. 1969; 10 (6): 10-14

    View details for PubMedID 5346662

  • Carleton Mathewson, Jr. of Sanford. American journal of surgery Chase, R. A. 1969; 118 (4): 488-489

    View details for PubMedID 4898189

  • Pharyngeal flap surgery: a review of the literature. Cleft palate journal YULES, R. B., Chase, R. A. 1969; 6: 303-308

    View details for PubMedID 4902603

  • Flexibility in surgical planning for velopharyngeal incompetence. Cleft palate journal Kaplan, E. N., JOBE, R. P., Chase, R. A. 1969; 6: 166-174

    View details for PubMedID 5253579

  • AN ALTERNATE TO POLLICIZATION IN SUBTOTAL THUMB RECONSTRUCTION PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1969; 44 (5): 421-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1969E541900001

    View details for PubMedID 4899315

  • PAYING PATIENT AND SURGICAL TEACHING AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY Chase, R. A. 1969; 118 (4): 507-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1969E279600003

    View details for PubMedID 5821683

  • A TRAINING METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF HYPERNASALITY IN SPEECH PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY YULES, R. B., Chase, R. A. 1969; 43 (2): 180-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1969C592900012

    View details for PubMedID 5765922

  • PRIVATE PATIENT AND SURGICAL TRAINING JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION Chase, R. A. 1969; 210 (12): 2283-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1969E890700025

    View details for PubMedID 5395429

  • The damaged index digit. A source of components to restore the crippled hand. journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume Chase, R. A. 1968; 50 (6): 1152-1160

    View details for PubMedID 5675399

  • QUANTITATIVE CINE EVALUATION OF PALATE AND PHARYNGEAL WALL MOBILITY IN NORMAL PALATES IN CLEFT PALATES AND IN VELOPHARYNGEAL INCOMPETENCY PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY YULES, R. B., Chase, R. A. 1968; 41 (2): 124-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968A782000004

    View details for PubMedID 5641796

  • QUANTITATIVE CINE RADIOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF VELOPHARYNGEAL INCOMPETENCE PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY YULES, R. B., Northway, W. H., Chase, R. A. 1968; 42 (1): 58-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968B472300010

    View details for PubMedID 5668094

  • RENAL TRANSPLANTATION IN RATS WITH USE OF MICROSURGICAL TECHNIQUES - A NEW METHOD SURGERY Daniller, A., Buchholz, R., Chase, R. A. 1968; 63 (6): 956-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968B237200015

    View details for PubMedID 4869889

  • UNILATERAL CONGENITAL ORBITAL CYST WITH MICROPHTHALMOS PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Briggs, R. M., Chase, R. A., DELLAPOR, A. 1968; 41 (4): 376-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968B082200017

    View details for PubMedID 5647406

  • FATE OF AUTOGENOUS WHOLE JOINTS TRANSPLANTED BY MICROVASCULAR ANASTOMOSES PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Buncke, H. J., DANILLER, A. I., SCHULZ, W. P., Chase, R. A. 1967; 39 (4): 333-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19679255900001

    View details for PubMedID 4960626

  • USE OF COMBINED PALATAL PUSHBACK AND PHARYNGEAL FLAP OPERATION - A PROGRESS REPORT PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY BUCHHOLZ, R. B., Chase, R. A., JOBE, R. P., Smith, H. 1967; 39 (6): 554-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19679472000003

    View details for PubMedID 6025683

  • USE OF BONE GRAFTS IN RECONSTRUCTION OF BONY ARCHITECTURE OF WRIST AND HAND SURGERY GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS WITH INTERNATIONAL ABSTRACTS OF SURGERY Nagel, D. A., Albright, J. A., SOUTHWIC, W. O., Chase, R. A. 1966; 122 (1): 55-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19667141200010

    View details for PubMedID 5321796

  • SMALL BLAST INJURIES PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Dibbell, D. G., Chase, R. A. 1966; 37 (4): 304-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19667665700005

    View details for PubMedID 5930578

  • A MODIFICATION OF THE COMBINED PUSHBACK AND PHARYNGEAL FLAP OPERATION. Plastic and reconstructive surgery Dibbell, D. G., Laub, D. R., JOBE, R. P., Chase, R. A. 1965; 36: 165-172

    View details for PubMedID 14339172

  • THE MANAGEMENT OF RING AVULSION INJURIES AND ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS IN THE HAND. Plastic and reconstructive surgery BEVIN, A. G., Chase, R. A. 1963; 32: 391-400

    View details for PubMedID 14068112

  • The management of congenital cleft lip and palate deformity. Connecticut medicine Chase, R. A. 1963; 27: 69-75

    View details for PubMedID 14020308

  • The hand in systemic disease. journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume BRADBURN, H. B., Chase, R. A., FESSEL, J. M. 1962; 44-A: 1395-1411

    View details for PubMedID 14041105

  • OBSERVATIONS ON FUNCTION OF FAUCIAL ISTHMUS IN DEGLUTITION JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH Shedd, D. P., Kirchner, J. A., Chase, R. A., Scatliff, J. H. 1961; 1 (4): 291-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A19617187B00009

    View details for PubMedID 13911546

  • An objective evaluation of palatopharyngeal competence. Plastic and reconstructive surgery and the transplantation bulletin Chase, R. A. 1960; 26: 23-39

    View details for PubMedID 13809380

  • VASCULAR DISORDERS OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY SURGICAL CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Chase, R. A. 1960; 40 (2): 471-482

    View details for Web of Science ID A1960XL45100026

    View details for PubMedID 13809383

  • FUNCTIONAL LEVELS OF AMPUTATION IN THE HAND SURGICAL CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Chase, R. A. 1960; 40 (2): 415-423

    View details for Web of Science ID A1960XL45100020

    View details for PubMedID 13809381

  • MANAGEMENT OF NERVE INJURIES IN THE UPPER EXTREMITY SURGICAL CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Chase, R. A. 1960; 40 (2): 287-295

    View details for Web of Science ID A1960XL45100005

    View details for PubMedID 13809382

  • Bilateral amputation in rehabilitation of paraplegics. Plastic and reconstructive surgery and the transplantation bulletin Chase, R. A., White, W. L. 1959; 24: 445-455

    View details for PubMedID 13809379

  • The early treatment of hand injuries. Medical bulletin of the U. S. Army, Europe. United States. Army, Europe. Medical Division Chase, R. A. 1956; 13 (10): 241-244

    View details for PubMedID 13368780

  • Recent advances in the treatment of breast cancer. Medical bulletin of the U. S. Army, Europe. United States. Army, Europe. Medical Division Chase, R. A. 1956; 13 (3): 69-73

    View details for PubMedID 13308467

  • The management of acute hand injuries. Connecticut state medical journal FLANIGAN, S., Shedd, D. P., Chase, R. A. 1955; 19 (10): 798-802

    View details for PubMedID 13261558

Conference Proceedings


  • Plastic surgeons in American hand surgery: The past, present, and future Chang, J., Hentz, V. R., Chase, R. A. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2000: 406-412

    View details for Web of Science ID 000088631000025

    View details for PubMedID 10946941

  • FURTHER EXPERIENCE WITH GENERAL BODY HYPOTHERMIA IN TREATMENT OF MASSIVE GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE Mark, J. B., GAISFORD, W. D., Knauer, C. M., Chase, R. A. CAHNERS PUBL CO. 1968: 286-?

    View details for Web of Science ID A1968B528700042

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  • PRELIMINARY HISTOPATHOLOGICAL OBSERVATION OF Q-SWITCHED RUBY LASER RADIATION ON DERMAL TATTOO PIGMENT IN MAN Laub, D. R., YULES, R. B., Arras, M., MURRAY, D. E., Crowley, L., Chase, R. A. ACADEMIC PRESS INC. 1968: 220-?

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  • TRANSPLANTATION AND PLASTIC SURGERY Chase, R. A. FRANKLIN H MARTIN FOUNDATION. 1967: 287-?

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