Bio

Bio


Robbie Majzner is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, Dr. Majzner attended Harvard Medical School, where he developed an interest in pediatric oncology. He completed his residency training in pediatrics at New York Presbyterian-Columbia and fellowship training in pediatric hematology-oncology at Johns Hopkins and the National Cancer Institute. During his fellowship, he cared for some of the first pediatric patients to receive CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, children with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who often had no other therapeutic option. Witnessing the success of CAR T cells in these patients drove Dr. Majzner to the laboratory, where he focuses on extending the use of CAR T cells to solid tumors. He has generated and optimized novel receptors to recognize antigens over-expressed on pediatric solid tumors such as GD2 (Mount/Majzner et al., Nature Medicine, 2018) B7-H3 (Majzner et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019), and ALK (Walker/Majzner et al., Molecular Therapy, 2017). Current work focuses on imparting multi-specificity to CAR T cells and optimizing these receptors to enhance their efficacy when the amount of target (antigen density) is limiting (Majzner et al., ASH 2018). By drawing on state of the art bioengineering techniques, the Majzner Laboratory focuses on enhancing the potency and specificity of CAR T cells for children with cancer.

Clinically, Dr. Majzner cares for all patients with neuroblastoma at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and has a specific interest in bringing novel immunotherapies to clinical trials for these patients and those with other solid tumors. He is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric hematology-oncology.

Clinical Focus


  • Cancer immunotherapy
  • Neuroblastoma
  • Cell therapy
  • Pediatric sarcomas
  • Solid tumors of childhood and adolescence
  • Pediatric oncology
  • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Be Brave Brooks Fund St. Baldrick's Scholar Award, St. Baldrick's Foundation (07/2018-07/2021)
  • Young Investigator Award, American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (05/2018)
  • SARC Career Development Award, Sarcoma Alliance for Research through Collaboration (07/2017-07/2018)
  • Young Investigator Award, Hyundai Hope on Wheels (07/2018-07/2020)
  • AACR-AbbVie Scholar-in-Training Award, American Association for Cancer Research (04/2016)
  • Fellows Award for Research Excellence, National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (06/2016)

Professional Education


  • Medical Education:Harvard Medical School (2009) MA
  • Residency:NY Presbyterian Hospital Columbia Pediatric Residency (2012) NY
  • Fellowship:Johns Hopkins and National Cancer Institute Ped Hematology and Oncology TrainingMD
  • Board Certification: Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, American Board of Pediatrics (2017)
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2013)

Patents


  • Robbie Majzner. "United States Patent WO2019014456A1 Compositions and methods for treatment of cancers harboring an h3k27m mutation (pending)", The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University, Jan 17, 2019

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Phase I CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Peds Recurrent/Refractory B Cell Malignancies Recruiting

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of CD19/CD22 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how well they work in treating children or young adults with CD19 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. A CAR is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells (T cells) can attack cancer cells by recognizing and responding to the CD19/CD22 proteins. These proteins are commonly found on B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CD19/CD22-CAR T cells and chemotherapy may work better in treating children or young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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Teaching

Publications

All Publications


  • CAR T Cells Targeting B7-H3, a Pan-Cancer Antigen, Demonstrate Potent Preclinical Activity Against Pediatric Solid Tumors and Brain Tumors CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH Majzner, R. G., Theruvath, J. L., Nellan, A., Heitzeneder, S., Cui, Y., Mount, C. W., Rietberg, S. P., Linde, M. H., Xu, P., Rota, C., Sotillo, E., Labanieh, L., Lee, D. W., Orentas, R. J., Dimitrov, D. S., Zhu, Z., St Croix, B., Delaidelli, A., Sekunova, A., Bonvini, E., Mitra, S. S., Quezado, M. M., Majeti, R., Monje, M., Sorensen, P. B., Maris, J. M., Mackall, C. L. 2019; 25 (8): 2560–74
  • Potent antitumor efficacy of anti-GD2 CAR T cells in H3-K27M+ diffuse midline gliomas. Nature medicine Mount, C. W., Majzner, R. G., Sundaresh, S., Arnold, E. P., Kadapakkam, M., Haile, S., Labanieh, L., Hulleman, E., Woo, P. J., Rietberg, S. P., Vogel, H., Monje, M., Mackall, C. L. 2018

    Abstract

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and other diffuse midline gliomas (DMGs) with mutated histone H3 K27M (H3-K27M)1-5 are aggressive and universally fatal pediatric brain cancers 6 . Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells have mediated impressive clinical activity in B cell malignancies7-10, and recent results suggest benefit in central nervous system malignancies11-13. Here, we report that patient-derived H3-K27M-mutant glioma cell cultures exhibit uniform, high expression of the disialoganglioside GD2. Anti-GD2 CAR T cells incorporating a 4-1BBz costimulatory domain 14 demonstrated robust antigen-dependent cytokine generation and killing of DMG cells in vitro. In five independent patient-derived H3-K27M+ DMG orthotopic xenograft models, systemic administration of GD2-targeted CAR T cells cleared engrafted tumors except for a small number of residual GD2lo glioma cells. To date, GD2-targeted CAR T cells have been well tolerated in clinical trials15-17. Although GD2-targeted CAR T cell administration was tolerated in the majority of mice bearing orthotopic xenografts, peritumoral neuroinflammation during the acute phase of antitumor activity resulted in hydrocephalus that was lethal in a fraction of animals. Given the precarious neuroanatomical location of midline gliomas, careful monitoring and aggressive neurointensive care management will be required for human translation. With a cautious multidisciplinary clinical approach, GD2-targeted CAR T cell therapy for H3-K27M+ diffuse gliomas of pons, thalamus and spinal cord could prove transformative for these lethal childhood cancers.

    View details for PubMedID 29662203

  • Harnessing the Immunotherapy Revolution for the Treatment of Childhood Cancers CANCER CELL Majzner, R. G., Heitzeneder, S., Mackall, C. L. 2017; 31 (4): 476-485

    Abstract

    Cancer immunotherapies can be classified into agents that amplify natural immune responses (e.g., checkpoint inhibitors) versus synthetic immunotherapies designed to initiate new responses (e.g., monoclonal antibodies [mAbs], chimeric antigen receptors [CARs]). Checkpoint inhibitors mediate unprecedented benefit in some adult cancers, but have not demonstrated significant activity in pediatric cancers, likely due their paucity of neoantigens. In contrast, synthetic immunotherapies such as mAbs and CAR T cells demonstrate impressive effects against childhood cancers. Intense efforts are underway to enhance the effectiveness of pediatric cancer immunotherapies through improved engineering of synthetic immunotherapies and by combining these with agents designed to amplify immune responses.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ccell.2017.03.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000398670600005

    View details for PubMedID 28366678

  • CD22-targeted CAR T cells induce remission in B-ALL that is naive or resistant to CD19-targeted CAR immunotherapy. Nature medicine Fry, T. J., Shah, N. N., Orentas, R. J., Stetler-Stevenson, M., Yuan, C. M., Ramakrishna, S., Wolters, P., Martin, S., Delbrook, C., Yates, B., Shalabi, H., Fountaine, T. J., Shern, J. F., Majzner, R. G., Stroncek, D. F., Sabatino, M., Feng, Y., Dimitrov, D. S., Zhang, L., Nguyen, S., Qin, H., Dropulic, B., Lee, D. W., Mackall, C. L. 2017

    Abstract

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting CD19 mediate potent effects in relapsed and/or refractory pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), but antigen loss is a frequent cause of resistance to CD19-targeted immunotherapy. CD22 is also expressed in most cases of B-ALL and is usually retained following CD19 loss. We report results from a phase 1 trial testing a new CD22-targeted CAR (CD22-CAR) in 21 children and adults, including 17 who were previously treated with CD19-directed immunotherapy. Dose-dependent antileukemic activity was observed, with complete remission obtained in 73% (11/15) of patients receiving ≥1 × 106 CD22-CAR T cells per kg body weight, including 5 of 5 patients with CD19dim or CD19- B-ALL. Median remission duration was 6 months. Relapses were associated with diminished CD22 site density that likely permitted CD22+ cell escape from killing by CD22-CAR T cells. These results are the first to establish the clinical activity of a CD22-CAR in B-ALL, including leukemia resistant to anti-CD19 immunotherapy, demonstrating potency against B-ALL comparable to that of CD19-CAR at biologically active doses. Our results also highlight the critical role played by antigen density in regulating CAR function.

    View details for PubMedID 29155426

  • Tumor Antigen and Receptor Densities Regulate Efficacy of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Targeting Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase. Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy Walker, A. J., Majzner, R. G., Zhang, L., Wanhainen, K., Long, A. H., Nguyen, S. M., Lopomo, P., Vigny, M., Fry, T. J., Orentas, R. J., Mackall, C. L. 2017

    Abstract

    We explored the utility of targeting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a cell surface receptor overexpressed on pediatric solid tumors, using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based immunotherapy. T cells expressing a CAR incorporating the single-chain variable fragment sequence of the ALK48 mAb linked to a 4-1BB-CD3ζ signaling domain lysed ALK-expressing tumor lines and produced interferon-gamma upon antigen stimulation but had limited anti-tumor efficacy in two xenograft models of human neuroblastoma. Further exploration demonstrated that cytokine production was highly dependent upon ALK target density and that target density of ALK on neuroblastoma cell lines was insufficient for maximal activation of CAR T cells. In addition, ALK CAR T cells demonstrated rapid and complete antigen-induced loss of receptor from the T cell surface via internalization. Using a model that simultaneously modulated antigen density and CAR expression, we demonstrated that CAR functionality is regulated by target antigen and CAR density and that low expression of either contributes to limited anti-tumor efficacy of the ALK CAR. These data suggest that stoichiometric relationships between CAR receptors and target antigens may significantly impact the anti-tumor efficacy of CAR T cells and that manipulation of these parameters could allow precise tuning of CAR T cell activity.

    View details for PubMedID 28676342

  • Clinical lessons learned from the first leg of the CAR T cell journey. Nature medicine Majzner, R. G., Mackall, C. L. 2019; 25 (9): 1341–55

    Abstract

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for B cell malignancies has surpassed expectations, driving an ever-expanding number of clinical trials and the first US Food and Drug Administration approvals of cell therapies for the treatment of cancer. This experience has illuminated some generalizable requirements for CAR T cell efficacy as well as the interplay between disease biology and clinical outcomes. Major CAR intrinsic variables affecting T cell behavior have been defined, and mechanisms of tumor resistance are increasingly understood. Here, we review the clinical experience with CAR T cells amassed to date, including but not limited to B cell malignancies, emphasizing factors associated with efficacy, resistance and major barriers to success. We also discuss how these insights are driving next-generation clinical trials, including those in solid tumors.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/s41591-019-0564-6

    View details for PubMedID 31501612

  • CAR T cells targeting B7-H3, a Pan-Cancer Antigen, Demonstrate Potent Preclinical Activity Against Pediatric Solid Tumors and Brain Tumors. Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research Majzner, R. G., Theruvath, J. L., Nellan, A., Heitzeneder, S., Cui, Y., Mount, C. W., Rietberg, S. P., Linde, M. H., Xu, P., Rota, C., Sotillo, E., Labanieh, L., Lee, D. W., Orentas, R. J., Dimitrov, D. S., Zhu, Z., St Croix, B., Delaidelli, A., Sekunova, A., Bonvini, E., Mitra, S. S., Quezado, M. M., Majeti, R., Monje, M., Sorensen, P. H., Maris, J. M., Mackall, C. L. 2019

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: Patients with relapsed pediatric solid tumors and CNS malignancies have few therapeutic options and frequently die of their disease. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown tremendous success in treating relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but this has not yet translated to treating solid tumors. This is partially due to a paucity of differentially expressed cell surface molecules on solid tumors that can be safely targeted. Here, we present B7-H3 (CD276) as a putative target for CAR T cell therapy of pediatric solid tumors, including those arising in the central nervous system.EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We developed a novel B7-H3 CAR whose binder is derived from a monoclonal antibody that has been shown to preferentially bind tumor tissues and has been safely used in humans in early phase clinical trials. We tested B7-H3 CAR T cells in a variety of pediatric cancer models.RESULTS: B7-H3 CAR T cells mediate significant anti-tumor activity in vivo, causing regression of established solid tumors in xenograft models including osteosarcoma, medulloblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. We demonstrate that B7-H3 CAR T cell efficacy is largely dependent upon high surface target antigen density on tumor tissues and that activity is greatly diminished against target cells that express low levels of antigen, thus providing a possible therapeutic window despite low-level normal tissue expression of B7-H3.CONCLUSIONS: B7-H3 CAR T cells could represent an exciting therapeutic option for patients with certain lethal relapsed or refractory pediatric malignancies which should be tested in carefully designed clinical trials.

    View details for PubMedID 30655315

  • Low CD19 Antigen Density Diminishes Efficacy of CD19 CAR T Cells and Can be Overcome By Rational Redesign of CAR Signaling Domains Majzner, R. G., Rietberg, S. P., Labanieh, L., Sotillo, E., Weber, E. W., Lynn, R. C., Theruvath, J. L., Yuan, C. M., Xu, P., Nguyen, S. M., Shah, N. N., Stetler-Stevenson, M., Fry, T. J., Lee, D. W., Mackall, C. L. AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY. 2018
  • CAR T Cell Therapy for Neuroblastoma FRONTIERS IN IMMUNOLOGY Richards, R. M., Sotillo, E., Majzner, R. G. 2018; 9
  • Tumor Antigen Escape from CAR T-cell Therapy. Cancer discovery Majzner, R. G., Mackall, C. L. 2018

    Abstract

    Emerging data from chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trials in B-cell malignancies demonstrate that a common mechanism of resistance to this novel class of therapeutics is the emergence of tumors with loss or downregulation of the target antigen. Antigen loss or antigen-low escape is likely to emerge as an even greater barrier to success in solid tumors, which manifest greater heterogeneity in target antigen expression. Potential approaches to overcome this challenge include engineering CAR T cells to achieve multispecificity and to respond to lower levels of target antigen and more efficient induction of natural antitumor immune responses as a result of CAR-induced inflammation. In this article, we review the evidence to date for antigen escape and downregulation and discuss approaches currently under study to overcome these obstacles.Significance: Antigen escape and downregulation have emerged as major issues impacting the durability of CAR T-cell therapy. Here, we explore their incidence and ways to overcome these obstacles in order to improve clinical outcomes. Cancer Discov; 8(10); 1-8. ©2018 AACR.

    View details for PubMedID 30135176

  • Anti-GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells as a potent immunotherapy regimen in xenograft models of histone 3 K27M mutant diffuse midline glioma Mount, C. W., Majzner, R., Sundaresh, S., Arnold, E. P., Kadapakkam, M., Haile, S., Labanieh, L., Woo, P., Rietberg, S. P., Vogel, H., Monje, M., Mackall, C. L. AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. 2018
  • ANTI-GD2 CHIMERIC ANTIGEN RECEPTOR T CELLS AS A POTENT IMMUNOTHERAPY REGIMEN IN XENOGRAFT MODELS OF HISTONE 3 K27M MUTANT DIFFUSE MIDLINE GLIOMA Mount, C., Majzner, R., Sundaresh, S., Arnold, E., Kadapakkam, M., Haile, S., Labanieh, L., Woo, P., Rietberg, S., Vogel, H., Monje, M., Mackall, C. OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. 2018: 56
  • Programming CAR-T cells to kill cancer NATURE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Labanieh, L., Majzner, R. G., Mackall, C. L. 2018; 2 (6): 377–91
  • CAR T CELLS TARGETING B7-H3, A PAN-CANCER ANTIGEN, DEMONSTRATE POTENT PRECLINICAL ACTIVITY AGAINST PEDIATRIC SOLID TUMORS AND BRAIN TUMORS Majzner, R., Nellan, A., Heitzeneder, S., Theruvath, J., Mackall, C. WILEY. 2018
  • B7-H3 CAR T CELLS MEDIATE IN VITRO AND IN VIVO ACTIVITY AGAINST NEUROBLASTOMA XENOGRAFTS Kadapakkam, M., Majzner, R., Xu, P., Mackall, C. WILEY. 2018
  • Durable regression of Medulloblastoma after regional and intravenous delivery of anti-HER2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells JOURNAL FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY OF CANCER Nellan, A., Rota, C., Majzner, R., Lester-McCully, C. M., Griesinger, A. M., Levy, J., Foreman, N. K., Warren, K. E., Lee, D. W. 2018; 6: 30

    Abstract

    Standard-of-care therapies for treating pediatric medulloblastoma have long-term side effects, even in children who are cured. One emerging modality of cancer therapy that could be equally effective without such side effects would be chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Knowing that human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in many medulloblastomas and has been used as a CAR T target before, we sought to evaluate the efficacy of more sophisticated anti-HER2 CAR T cells, as well as the feasibility and efficacy of different routes of delivering these cells, for the treatment of pediatric medulloblastoma.Daoy, D283 and D425 medulloblastoma cell lines were characterized by flow cytometry to evaluate HER2 expression. Anti-tumor efficacy of HER2-BBz-CAR T cells in vitro was performed using cytokine release and immune cytotoxicity assays compared to control CD19 CAR T cells. In vivo, Daoy and D283 tumor cells were orthotopically implanted in the posterior fossa of NOD.Cg-Prkdc scid Il2rg tm1Wjl /SzJ (NSG) mice and treated with regional or intravenous HER2-BBz-CAR T cells or control CD19 CAR T cells. Non-human primates (NHPs) bearing ventricular and lumbar reservoirs were treated with target autologous cells bearing extracellular HER2 followed by autologous HER2-CAR T cells intraventricularly. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood were collected serially to measure the persistence of delivered cells and cytokines.HER2-BBz-CAR T cells effectively clear medulloblastoma orthotopically implanted in the posterior fossa of NSG mice via both regional and intravenous delivery in xenograft models. Intravenous delivery requires a log higher dose compared to regional delivery. NHPs tolerated intraventricular delivery of autologous cells bearing extracellular HER2 followed by HER2-BBz-CAR T cells without experiencing any systemic toxicity.HER2-BBz-CAR T cells show excellent pre-clinical efficacy in vitro and in mouse medulloblastoma models, and their intraventricular delivery is feasible and safe in NHPs. A clinical trial of HER2-BBz-CAR T cells directly delivered into cerebrospinal fluid should be designed for patients with relapsed medulloblastoma.

    View details for PubMedID 29712574

  • Neurotoxicity Associated with a High-Affinity GD2 CAR-Letter. Cancer immunology research Majzner, R. G., Weber, E. W., Lynn, R. C., Xu, P., Mackall, C. L. 2018; 6 (4): 494–95

    View details for PubMedID 29610423

  • Programming CAR-T cells to kill cancer. Nature biomedical engineering Labanieh, L., Majzner, R. G., Mackall, C. L. 2018; 2 (6): 377–91

    Abstract

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that are specific for tumour antigens have led to high complete response rates in patients with haematologic malignancies. Despite this early success, major challenges to the broad application of CAR-T cells as cancer therapies remain, including treatment-associated toxicities and cancer relapse with antigen-negative tumours. Targeting solid tumours with CAR-T cells poses additional obstacles because of the paucity of tumour-specific antigens and the immunosuppressive effects of the tumour microenvironment. To overcome these challenges, T cells can be programmed with genetic modules that increase their therapeutic potency and specificity. In this Review Article, we survey major advances in the engineering of next-generation CAR-T therapies for haematologic cancers and solid cancers, with particular emphasis on strategies for the control of CAR specificity and activity and on approaches for improving CAR-T-cell persistence and overcoming immunosuppression. We also lay out a roadmap for the development of off-the-shelf CAR-T cells.

    View details for PubMedID 31011197

  • CAR T Cell Therapy for Neuroblastoma. Frontiers in immunology Richards, R. M., Sotillo, E., Majzner, R. G. 2018; 9: 2380

    Abstract

    Patients with high risk neuroblastoma have a poor prognosis and survivors are often left with debilitating long term sequelae from treatment. Even after integration of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody therapy into standard, upftont protocols, 5-year overall survival rates are only about 50%. The success of anti-GD2 therapy has proven that immunotherapy can be effective in neuroblastoma. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells has the potential to build on this success. In early phase clinical trials, CAR T cell therapy for neuroblastoma has proven safe and feasible, but significant barriers to efficacy remain. These include lack of T cell persistence and potency, difficulty in target identification, and an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. With recent advances in CAR T cell engineering, many of these issues are being addressed in the laboratory. In this review, we summarize the clinical trials that have been completed or are underway for CAR T cell therapy in neuroblastoma, discuss the conclusions and open questions derived from these trials, and consider potential strategies to improve CAR T cell therapy for patients with neuroblastoma.

    View details for PubMedID 30459759

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6232778

  • Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide after Bone Marrow Transplantation Is Not Associated with an Increased Risk of Donor-Derived Malignancy BIOLOGY OF BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Majzner, R. G., Mogri, H., Varadhan, R., Brown, P., Cooke, K. R., Bolanos-Meade, J., Swinnen, L., Kanakry, J., Luznik, L., Jones, R. J., Fuchs, E., Ambinder, R., Kasamon, Y., Symons, H. J. 2017; 23 (4): 612-617

    Abstract

    Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) can be used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis alone or in combination with other agents and is associated with excellent rates of engraftment and acute and chronic GVHD, as well as absence of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease. No study has previously evaluated the risk for developing donor-derived malignancy (DDM) in patients who receive PTCy. Giving chemotherapy in the immediate post-transplantation period carries with it a theoretic risk of disturbing the graft at a time of increased hematopoietic stress and causing or accelerating the development of malignancy. From 2000 to 2011, 789 patients underwent allogeneic transplantation and received PTCy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were 4 cases of DDM identified among this large population, which is similar to or below the rate of DDM published in the literature. We found that the estimated cumulative incidence by competing risk analysis of DDM is 1.4% (SE, 1.02%). The use of PTCy does not appear to increase the risk of DDM.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.12.640

    View details for Web of Science ID 000397364300011

    View details for PubMedID 28062216

  • Assessment of programmed death-ligand 1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells in pediatric cancer tissues. Cancer Majzner, R. G., Simon, J. S., Grosso, J. F., Martinez, D., Pawel, B. R., Santi, M., Merchant, M. S., Geoerger, B., Hezam, I., Marty, V., Vielh, P., Daugaard, M., Sorensen, P. H., Mackall, C. L., Maris, J. M. 2017

    Abstract

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling in the tumor microenvironment dampens immune responses to cancer, and blocking this axis induces antitumor effects in several malignancies. Clinical studies of PD-1 blockade are only now being initiated in pediatric patients, and little is known regarding programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in common childhood cancers. The authors characterized PD-L1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells (TAICs) (lymphocytes and macrophages) in common pediatric cancers.Whole slide sections and tissue microarrays were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 expression and for the presence of TAICs. TAICs were also screened for PD-L1 expression.Thirty-nine of 451 evaluable tumors (9%) expressed PD-L1 in at least 1% of tumor cells. The highest frequency histotypes comprised Burkitt lymphoma (80%; 8 of 10 tumors), glioblastoma multiforme (36%; 5 of 14 tumors), and neuroblastoma (14%; 17 of 118 tumors). PD-L1 staining was associated with inferior survival among patients with neuroblastoma (P = .004). Seventy-four percent of tumors contained lymphocytes and/or macrophages. Macrophages were significantly more likely to be identified in PD-L1-positive versus PD-L1-negative tumors (P < .001).A subset of diagnostic pediatric cancers exhibit PD-L1 expression, whereas a much larger fraction demonstrates infiltration with tumor-associated lymphocytes. PD-L1 expression may be a biomarker for poor outcome in neuroblastoma. Further preclinical and clinical investigation will define the predictive nature of PD-L1 expression in childhood cancers both at diagnosis and after exposure to chemoradiotherapy. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

    View details for PubMedID 28608950

  • New developments in immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors. Current opinion in pediatrics Schultz, L. M., Majzner, R., Davis, K. L., Mackall, C. 2017

    Abstract

    Building upon preclinical advances, we are uncovering immunotherapy strategies that are translating into improved outcomes in tumor subsets. Advanced pediatric solid tumors carry poor prognoses and resultant robust efforts to apply immunotherapy advances to pediatric solid tumors are in progress. Here, we discuss recent developments in the field using mAb and mAb-based therapies including checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs).The pediatric solid tumor mAb experience targeting the diganglioside, GD2, for patients with neuroblastoma has been the most compelling to date. GD2 and alternative antigen-specific mAbs are now being incorporated into antibody-drug conjugates, bispecific antibodies and CARs for treatment of solid tumors. CARs in pediatric solid tumors have not yet achieved comparative responses to the hematologic CAR experience; however, novel strategies such as bispecific targeting, intratumoral administration and improved understanding of T-cell biology may yield enhanced CAR-efficacy. Therapeutic effect using single-agent checkpoint blocking antibodies in pediatric solid tumors also remains limited to date. Combinatorial strategies continue to hold promise and the clinical effect in tumor subsets with high antigenic burden is being explored.Pediatric immunotherapy remains at early stages of translation, yet we anticipate that with advanced technology, we will achieve widespread, efficacious use of immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/MOP.0000000000000564

    View details for PubMedID 29189429

  • Pulmonary function after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is significantly better in pediatric recipients following reduced toxicity compared with myeloablative conditioning BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION Majzner, R., Sandoval, C., Dozor, A. J., Jin, Z., Van de Ven, C., Dalal, R., Morris, E., Harrison, L., Wolownik, K., Fabricatore, S., Baxter-Lowe, L. A., Cairo, M. S. 2016; 51 (11): 1530-1532

    View details for DOI 10.1038/bmt.2016.172

    View details for Web of Science ID 000387243700025

    View details for PubMedID 27322849

  • T cell depletion utilizing CD34(+) stem cell selection and CD3(+) addback from unrelated adult donors in paediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY Geyer, M. B., Ricci, A. M., Jacobson, J. S., Majzner, R., Duffy, D., van de Ven, C., Ayello, J., Bhatia, M., Garvin, J. H., George, D., Satwani, P., Harrison, L., Morris, E., Semidei-Pomales, M., Schwartz, J., Alobeid, B., Baxter-Lowe, L. A., Cairo, M. S. 2012; 157 (2): 205-219

    Abstract

    CD34-selected haploidentical and unrelated donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloSCT) in paediatric recipients is associated with sustained engraftment and low risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), but limited by delayed immune reconstitution and increased risk of viral and fungal infection. The optimal dose of donor T cells to prevent graft failure and minimize risk of early opportunistic infection and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), while avoiding severe aGVHD, remains unknown. We prospectively studied CD34-selected 8-10/10 human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched unrelated donor (MUD) peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) in a cohort of 19 paediatric AlloSCT recipients with malignant (n = 13) or non-malignant (n = 6) diseases. T cells were added back to achieve total dose 1·0-2·5 × 10(5)  CD3(+) /kg. GVHD pharmacoprophylaxis consisted only of tacrolimus. All patients engrafted neutrophils. Probabilities of grade II-IV aGVHD, limited chronic GVHD (cGVHD), and extensive cGVHD were 15·8%, 23·3%, and 0%, respectively. One patient developed PTLD. One-year infection-related mortality was 5·6%. T cell immune reconstitution was delayed. One-year overall survival was 82·3%. Five patients with malignant disease ultimately died from progressive disease. CD34-selected MUD PBSCT using a defined dose of T cell add-back resulted in high rates of engraftment and low risk of grade II-IV aGVHD, early transplantation-related mortality, and extensive cGVHD.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2141.2012.09048.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000302062800009

    View details for PubMedID 22313507