Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification, Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2018)
  • Residency:Stanford University Pediatric Residency (2018) CA
  • Medical Education:Stanford University School of Medicine Registrar (2015) CA
  • Masters in Public Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (2011)
  • Masters in Medical Anthropology, School of Oriental and African Studies, London (2010)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


I have developed a new promising neonatal mortality prediction score at the University of Gondar Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Gondar, Ethiopia. The score predicts approximately 84% of neonatal deaths in the NICU using clinical variables. I have a dataset over 800 NICU admissions in Gondar. I am recruiting scholars who are interested in conducting clinical and epidemiological research to validate, refine, and implement the mortality score to reduce neonatal mortality in Ethiopia. I can mentor scholars to conduct research in Ethiopia, facilitate in-country supervision at the University of Gondar, and facilitate statistical support with Stanford's Department of Statistics.

Publications

All Publications


  • Liver Failure and Rash in a 6-week-old Girl PEDIATRICS IN REVIEW Mediratta, R., Schwenk, H., Rao, A., Chitkara, R. 2018; 39 (6): 315–U22

    View details for PubMedID 29858298

  • Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew. Advances in medical education and practice Rizal, R. E., Mediratta, R. P., Xie, J., Kambhampati, S., Hills-Evans, K., Montacute, T., Zhang, M., Zaw, C., He, J., Sanchez, M., Pischel, L. 2015; 6: 471-477

    Abstract

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians.

    View details for DOI 10.2147/AMEP.S70294

    View details for PubMedID 26170731

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC4492543

  • Risk Factors and Case Management of Acute Diarrhoea in North Gondar Zone, Ethiopia JOURNAL OF HEALTH POPULATION AND NUTRITION Mediratta, R. P., Feleke, A., Moulton, L. H., Yifru, S., Sack, R. B. 2010; 28 (3): 253-263

    Abstract

    In Ethiopia, evidence is lacking about maternal care-taking and environmental risk factors that contribute to acute diarrhoea and the case management of diarrhoea. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors and to understand the management of acute diarrhoea. A pretested structured questionnaire was used for interviewing mothers of 440 children in a prospective, matched, case-control study at the University of Gondar Referral and Teaching Hospital in Gondar, Ethiopia. Results of multivariate analysis demonstrated that children who were breastfed and not completely weaned and mothers who were farmers were protective factors; risk factors for diarrhoea included sharing drinking-water and introducing supplemental foods. Children presented with acute diarrhoea for 3.9 days with 4.3 stools per day. Mothers usually did not increase breastmilk and other fluids during diarrhoea episodes and generally did not take children with diarrhoea to traditional healers. Incorporating messages about the prevention and treatment of acute diarrhoea into child-health interventions will help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000279758900007

    View details for PubMedID 20635636