Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • A Brief Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Depression Among Military Veterans Recruiting

    This study investigates the impact of brief behavioral insomnia treatment on depressive symptoms among military veterans.

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  • A Sleep-Oriented Intervention for Suicidal Behaviors Recruiting

    An open-label trial to investigate the use of a behavioral insomnia treatment for suicidal ideation.

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Teaching

2013-14 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Eating disorder and obsessive-compulsive symptoms in a sample of bulimic women: Perfectionism as a mediating factor PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES Bernert, R. A., Timpano, K. R., Peterson, C. B., Crow, S. J., Bardone-Cone, A. M., Le Grange, D., Klein, M., Crosby, R. D., Mitchell, J. E., Wonderlich, S. A., Joiner, T. E. 2013; 54 (2): 231-235
  • Clinical significance of night-to-night sleep variability in insomnia SLEEP MEDICINE Suh, S., Nowakowski, S., Bernert, R. A., Ong, J. C., Siebern, A. T., Dowdle, C. L., Manber, R. 2012; 13 (5): 469-475

    Abstract

    To evaluate the clinical relevance of night-to-night variability of sleep schedules and insomnia symptoms.The sample consisted of 455 patients (193 men, mean age=48) seeking treatment for insomnia in a sleep medicine clinic. All participants received group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI). Variability in sleep parameters was assessed using sleep diary data. Two composite scores were computed, a behavioral schedule composite score (BCS) and insomnia symptom composite score (ICS). The Insomnia Severity Index, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Morningness-Eveningness Composite Scale were administered at baseline and post-treatment.Results revealed that greater BCS scores were significantly associated with younger age, eveningness chronotype, and greater depression severity (p<0.001). Both depression severity and eveningness chronotype independently predicted variability in sleep schedules (p<0.001). Finally, CBTI resulted in reduced sleep variability for all sleep diary variables except bedtime. Post-treatment symptom reductions in depression severity were greater among those with high versus low baseline BCS scores (p<0.001).Results suggest that variability in sleep schedules predict reduction in insomnia and depressive severity following group CBTI. Schedule variability may be particularly important to assess and address among patients with high depression symptoms and those with the evening chronotype.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.sleep.2011.10.034

    View details for Web of Science ID 000303346800004

    View details for PubMedID 22357064

  • Sleep problems outperform depression and hopelessness as cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors of suicidal ideation and behavior in young adults in the military JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS Ribeiro, J. D., Pease, J. L., Gutierrez, P. M., Silva, C., Bernert, R. A., Rudd, M. D., Joiner, T. E. 2012; 136 (3): 743-750

    Abstract

    Sleep problems appear to represent an underappreciated and important warning sign and risk factor for suicidal behaviors. Given past research indicating that disturbed sleep may confer such risk independent of depressed mood, in the present report we compared self-reported insomnia symptoms to several more traditional, well-established suicide risk factors: depression severity, hopelessness, PTSD diagnosis, as well as anxiety, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse symptoms.Using multiple regression, we examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between insomnia symptoms and suicidal ideation and behavior, controlling for depressive symptom severity, hopelessness, PTSD diagnosis, anxiety symptoms, and drug and alcohol abuse symptoms in a sample of military personnel (N=311).In support of a priori hypotheses, self-reported insomnia symptoms were cross-sectionally associated with suicidal ideation, even after accounting for symptoms of depression, hopelessness, PTSD diagnosis, anxiety symptoms and drug and alcohol abuse. Self-reported insomnia symptoms also predicted suicide attempts prospectively at one-month follow up at the level of a non-significant trend, when controlling for baseline self-reported insomnia symptoms, depression, hopelessness, PTSD diagnosis and anxiety, drug and alcohol abuse symptoms. Insomnia symptoms were unique predictors of suicide attempt longitudinally when only baseline self-reported insomnia symptoms, depressive symptoms and hopelessness were controlled.The assessment of insomnia symptoms consisted of only three self-report items. Findings may not generalize outside of populations at severe suicide risk.These findings suggest that insomnia symptoms may be an important target for suicide risk assessment and the treatment development of interventions to prevent suicide.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2011.09.049

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301996000071

    View details for PubMedID 22032872

  • CBT for Insomnia in Patients with High and Low Depressive Symptom Severity: Adherence and Clinical Outcomes JOURNAL OF CLINICAL SLEEP MEDICINE Manber, R., Bernert, R. A., Suh, S., Nowakowski, S., Siebern, A. T., Ong, J. C. 2011; 7 (6): 645-652

    Abstract

    To evaluate whether depressive symptom severity leads to poorer response and perceived adherence to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) and to examine the impact of CBTI on well-being, depressive symptom severity, and suicidal ideation.Pre- to posttreatment case replication series comparing low depression (LowDep) and high depression (HiDep) groups (based on a cutoff of 14 on the Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]).127 men and 174 women referred for the treatment of insomnia.Seven sessions of group CBTI.Improvement in the insomnia severity, perceived energy, productivity, self-esteem, other aspects of wellbeing, and overall treatment satisfaction did not differ between the HiDep and LowDep groups (p > 0.14). HiDep patients reported lower adherence to a fixed rise time, restricting time in bed, and changing expectations about sleep (p < 0.05). HiDep participants experienced significant reductions in BDI, after removing the sleep item. Levels of suicidal ideation dropped significantly among patients with pretreatment elevations (p < 0.0001).Results suggest that pre- to post CBTI improvements in insomnia symptoms, perceived energy, productivity, self-esteem, and other aspects of well-being were similar among patients with and without elevation in depressive symptom severity. Thus, the benefits of CBTI extend beyond insomnia and include improvements in non-sleep outcomes, such as overall well-being and depressive symptom severity, including suicidal ideation, among patients with baseline elevations. Results identify aspects of CBTI that may merit additional attention to further improve outcomes among patients with insomnia and elevated depressive symptom severity.

    View details for DOI 10.5664/jcsm.1472

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300161900012

    View details for PubMedID 22171204

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