School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 247 Results

  • Benedict Anchang

    Benedict Anchang

    Instructor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cancer is a heterogeneous disease. I am passionate about using computational systems biology to study heterogeneity in normal and disease progression as well as improve patient health by developing better diagnostic and treatment strategies using high throughput technologies.

  • Patrick Barnes

    Patrick Barnes

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Advanced imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, of injury to the developing central nervous system; including fetal, neonatal, infant and young child; and, including nonaccidental injury (e.g. child abuse).

  • Richard Barth

    Richard Barth

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Sonographic diagnosis of fetal anomalies.
    Focus interest in the diagnosis and conservative (non-surgical and minimal radiation) management of congenital broncho pulmonary malformations.
    Imaging of appendicitis in children.
    Sonography of the pediatric testis.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Applications of computer graphics to medical imaging, with emphasis on diagnosis of bowel pathology using virtual colonoscopy. Dynamic joint imaging with open Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

  • Hans-Christoph Becker

    Hans-Christoph Becker

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Myocardial bridges (MB) with associated upfront atherosclerotic lesions are common findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Abnormal septal wall motion in exercise echocardiography (EE) may to be associated with MB. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is considered the gold standard for the detection of MB. We investigate whether CTA is comparable to IVUS for the assessment of MB and upstream plaques in symptomatic patients with suspicion for MB raised by EE.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio Professor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthoganol" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Joshua Cates

    Joshua Cates

    Instructor, Radiology - Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Joshua's research focus at Stanford has been enabling technologies and instrumentation for future and vital roles of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), including: Ultra-fast Time-of-Flight PET (TOF-PET) instrumentation, clinical PET detector technology with high sensitivity and resolving power for diagnostics in early stage cancer, high resolution MRI-compatible TOF-PET detector technologies for oncology and neurology, and devices for precise quantification of tracer kinetics in dynamic PET imaging. The ultimate goal is to introduce new PET imaging systems that advance capabilities of whole body clinical imaging in sensitivity, accuracy, and precision for oncology, neurology, and cardiology.

    He is also interested in the application of instrumentation and algorithms for imaging in biomedical, high energy and applied physics, astronomy, energy, materials, nuclear security, and autonomous vehicle research.

  • Joseph Cheng

    Joseph Cheng

    Instructor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests MRI; data acquisition & image reconstruction; deep learning; fast imaging

  • Zhen Cheng

    Zhen Cheng

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests To develop novel molecular imaging probes and techniques for non-invasively early detection of cancer using multimodality imaging technologies including PET, SPECT, MRI, optical imaging, etc.

  • Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group's primary objectives are:

    1) Novel radioligand and radiotracer development.
    We will develop novel PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging agents with MIPS and Stanford faculty as well as other outside collaborations including academia and pharmaceutical industry. Although my personal research interests will be to discover and design of candidate probes that target molecular targets in the brain, our group focus will primarily be on cancer biology and gene therapy. In conjunction with our state-of-the-art imaging facility, promising candidates will be evaluated by PET-CT/MR imaging in small animals and primates. Successful radioligands and/or radiotracers will be extended towards future human clinical applications.

    2) Designing new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies.
    We will aim to design new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies that may have utility for future radiopharmaceutical development in our lab and the general radiochemistry community.

    3) Radiochemistry production of routine clinical tracers.
    Since we also have many interests with many Stanford faculty and outside collaborators, our efforts will also include the routine radiochemistry production of many existing radiotracers for human and non-human use. Our routine clinical tracers will be synthesized in custom-made or commercial synthetic modules (i.e. GE TRACERlab modules) housed in lead-shielded cells and be distributed manually or automatically (i.e. Comecer Dorothea) to our imagers.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ultrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a physician-scientist involved in the care of patients and investigating novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to develop innovative, safe, accurate and efficient imaging solutions to significant problems in disease diagnosis. My research team works on novel cellular imaging techniques for improved detection and characterization of malignant tumors in pediatric patients, for the diagnosis of immune system disorders and for in vivo evaluation of stem cell transplants.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Guido A. Davidzon

    Guido A. Davidzon

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    Bio Dr. Guido A. Davidzon is a physician-scientist board certified in Nuclear Medicine. He is an attending physician in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care.

    He graduated with honors from medical school in Argentina and completed an internship at Yale University New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He did his residency and was chief resident at Stanford Health Care. He completed a research fellowship in mitochondrial diseases at Columbia University in New York and, a U.S. National Library of Medicine Award supported, Biomedical Informatics fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in conjunction with a Science Masters at MIT.

    Dr. Davidzon is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His clinical specialties include early diagnostic imaging of cancer, coronary artery disease, and dementias using molecular probes as well as the treatment of cancer for which he employs targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy.

    Dr. Davidzon investigates the use of machine learning in medical imaging to improve clinical outcomes, he is involved in the professional Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He serves as a peer reviewer for multiple medical journals. Dr. Davidzon is a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina and has lived in the U.S. for over a decade. He travels to Argentina frequently, with his wife and three sons.

  • Wendy B. DeMartini, M.D., FSBI

    Wendy B. DeMartini, M.D., FSBI

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Wendy DeMartini is a Professor and the Chief of the Breast Imaging Division in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. DeMartini completed her fellowship in Breast Imaging at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. She then served as Breast Imaging faculty at the University of Washington where she became Associate Professor and Associate Director of Clinical Services, and at the University of Wisconsin where she became Professor and Chief of Breast Imaging. Her work is focused upon high quality patient care, clinical research and education.
    Dr. DeMartini has more than 100 research presentations, abstracts/publications, review articles or book chapters. Her research is directed toward the appropriate evidence-based use of imaging tests to optimize the detection and evaluation of breast cancer. She has served as an investigator on several studies of breast MRI funded by the National Cancer Institute and by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Particular research topics have included the development of a pilot tool for predicting the probability of malignancy of breast MRI lesions, assessment of the impact of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on breast MRI accuracy, and evaluation of current utilization patterns of breast MRI and other emerging technologies.
    Dr. DeMartini is a highly sought-after educator. She lectures on a broad spectrum of breast imaging topics nationally and internationally, including in the Americas, Europe, Australasia and Africa. She is also the Co-Director of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Education Center Breast MRI with Biopsy Course. Dr. DeMartini is an active member of many professional organizations and committees, including in the Radiologic Society of North America, the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI). She was elected as an SBI Fellow in 2009, and will be President of the SBI in 2017-2018.

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Bio Dr. Demirci is currently a Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine with tenure at the Canary Center for Early Cancer Detection. Prior to his Stanford appointment, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology serving at the Division of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Infectious Diseases and Renal Division. He leads a group of 20+ researchers focusing on micro- and nano-scale technologies. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University.

    The Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine Lab (BAMM) specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. Our goal is apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, we create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic.

    Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. Dr. Demirci has published over 120 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. He is fellow-elect of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (AIMBE, 2017). His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012), Scientist of the year award from Stanford radiology Department (2017). He was selected as one of the world?s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review at the age of 28. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur?s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow, KOEK Biotechnology and LEVITAS. There has been over 10,000 live births in the US, Europe and Turkey using the sperm selection technology that came out of Dr. Demirci's lab. He has been cited over 2500 times within the last two years (H index, 48).

  • Terry Desser

    Terry Desser

    Professor of Radiology (Abdominal Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of gastrointestinal tract cancer
    Ultrasound
    Simulated learning environment

  • Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Robert Dodd, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Dodd is involved in clinical trials using endovascular coils that have a fiber coating that help heal aneurysms of the neck and can prevent an aneurysm from reforming. He uses minimally invasive endoscopic techniques to treat brain tumors.

    Dodd's research interests are in cerebral blood vessel reactivity and stroke.

  • Ahmed Nagy El Kaffas

    Ahmed Nagy El Kaffas

    Instructor, Radiology

    Bio We develop quantitative imaging methods to characterize the tumor microenvironment, and to subsequently relate these imaging parameters to biomarkers that can be used for cancer surveillance, diagnosis and treatment monitoring/characterization. The focus is on 1) developing new acquisition methods and protocols to enhance quantification, 2) designing new image processing algorithms, analysis parameters and statistical models to quantitatively characterize imaging data, and 3) using advanced AI methods to further refine quantification or classification. While our methods can be used for other imaging modalities, we primarily focus on Ultrasound imaging modes such as contrast, molecular, elastography and spectroscopic ultrasound. Disease focus include liver cancer and liver metastasis, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, and tumor blood flow characterization.

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