School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 126 Results

  • Herbert Abrams

    Herbert Abrams

    Professor of Radiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Cardiovascular pathophysiology 2. Angiography and interventional radiology 3. Pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension 4. Biological effects of ionizing radiation on humans 5. Disabled leadership and its impact on decision making 6. Health policy

  • Patrick Barnes

    Patrick Barnes

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Advanced imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, of injury to the developing central nervous system; including fetal, neonatal, infant and young child; and, including nonaccidental injury (e.g. child abuse).

  • Richard Barth

    Richard Barth

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Sonographic diagnosis of fetal anomalies.
    Focus interest in the diagnosis and conservative (non-surgical and minimal radiation) management of congenital broncho pulmonary malformations.
    Imaging of appendicitis in children.
    Sonography of the pediatric testis.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Applications of computer graphics to medical imaging, with emphasis on diagnosis of bowel pathology using virtual colonoscopy. Dynamic joint imaging with open Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Chronic pain sufferers are unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our lab is interested in 'imaging pain' by using multimodality molecular imaging techniques to study nociception and neuronal inflammation as a means of improving objective, image-guided diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain disorders. We develop new molecular contrast agents for use in positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), working towards eventual clincal translation.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Zhen Cheng

    Zhen Cheng

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests To develop novel molecular imaging probes and techniques for non-invasively early detection of cancer using multimodality imaging technologies including PET, SPECT, MRI, optical imaging, etc.

  • Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Frederick T. Chin, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group's primary objectives are:

    1) Novel radioligand and radiotracer development.
    We will develop novel PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging agents with MIPS and Stanford faculty as well as other outside collaborations including academia and pharmaceutical industry. Although my personal research interests will be to discover and design of candidate probes that target molecular targets in the brain, our group focus will primarily be on cancer biology and gene therapy. In conjunction with our state-of-the-art imaging facility, promising candidates will be evaluated by PET-CT/MR imaging in small animals and primates. Successful radioligands and/or radiotracers will be extended towards future human clinical applications.

    2) Designing new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies.
    We will aim to design new radiolabeling techniques and methodologies that may have utility for future radiopharmaceutical development in our lab and the general radiochemistry community.

    3) Radiochemistry production of routine clinical tracers.
    Since we also have many interests with many Stanford faculty and outside collaborators, our efforts will also include the routine radiochemistry production of many existing radiotracers for human and non-human use. Our routine clinical tracers will be synthesized in custom-made or commercial synthetic modules (i.e. GE TRACERlab modules) housed in lead-shielded cells and be distributed manually or automatically (i.e. Comecer Dorothea) to our imagers.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), of Microbiology and Immunology and, by courtesy, of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Ultrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As a physician-scientist involved in the care of patients and investigating novel "cellular imaging" technologies, my goal is to develop innovative, non-invasive, clinically applicable imaging solutions to significant problems in disease diagnosis. My research team works on novel "cellular imaging" techniques for improved detection and characterization of malignant tumors, for the diagnosis of immune system disorders and for in vivo evaluation of stem cell transplants.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-guided cryosurgery of prostate cancer

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Bio Dr. Demirci is currently an associate professor at Stanford University School of Medicine, Canary Center Early Cancer Detection. Prior to his Stanford appointment, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology serving at the Division of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Infectious Diseases and Renal Division. He leads a group of 20+ researchers focusing on micro- and nano-scale technologies. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005 and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University.

    The Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine Labs (BAMM) laboratory specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. We apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, our goal is to create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic.

    Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. His research interests involve applications of microfluidics and acoustics in medicine, especially: microfluidics for inexpensive, disposable CD4 counts and viral load for HIV in resource-constrained settings for global health problems; 3-D bioprinting and tissue models including 3-D cancer and neural cultures. Dr. Demirci has published over 80 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Materials, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), and the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012). He was selected as one of the world?s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur?s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow Inc. and KOEK Biotechnology.

  • Terry Desser

    Terry Desser

    Associate Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Imaging of gastrointestinal tract cancer
    Ultrasound
    Simulated learning environment

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