Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

Professional Education


  • Fellowship: Brigham and Women's Hospital Medical Education Fellowship MA
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2017)
  • Residency: Brigham and Women's Hospital Internal Medicine Residency (2017) MA
  • Medical Education: Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (2014) NY

Publications

All Publications


  • Getting up to Speed: A Resident-Led Inpatient Curriculum for New Internal Medicine Interns. MedEdPORTAL : the journal of teaching and learning resources Caton, J. B., Penn, E. H., Nemer, M. K., Katz, J. T., Yialamas, M. A. 2019; 15: 10866

    Abstract

    Introduction: The transition from medical school to internship is an important milestone in medical training and often is a challenge for trainees. This resident-designed and -led inpatient curriculum for internal medicine interns was created to address common clinical scenarios and how best to manage them.Methods: During the Intern Summer Curriculum, interns participated in weekly small-group sessions facilitated by senior residents. Each case-based session was structured around a clinical topic. Working in pairs with an expert faculty member as a reviewer, volunteer junior and senior residents reviewed and edited each session. During the 2 years we conducted surveys of learners and instructors in the curriculum, there were 200 intern learners and 68 resident instructors.Results: The Intern Summer Curriculum was evaluated highly by all participants. Of the intern and resident survey responses, 92% (N = 77) of interns felt that the curriculum should be continued for future interns, and 100% (N = 50) of residents felt that residents should continue to teach in this program. Interns felt that the curricular content helped them better understand topics they commonly encountered and improved their ability to perform day-to-day tasks. Resident instructors felt that teaching in this program was a valuable learning experience and helped strengthen teaching skills.Discussion: This resident-run inpatient curriculum for internal medicine interns can serve as a valuable learning experience for the intern learners, as well as for the resident instructors, and aid in bringing all interns up to speed at the beginning of intern year.

    View details for DOI 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10866

    View details for PubMedID 32051849

  • A flipped classroom in graduate medical education. The clinical teacher Blair, R. A., Caton, J. B., Hamnvik, O. R. 2019

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: The role of the flipped classroom model in graduate medical education (GME) is not yet defined. We set out to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of a flipped classroom instructional model in an internal medicine curriculum.METHODS: This pilot study was carried out in an academic medical centre in the USA with 43 second-year internal medicine postgraduate trainees. Trainees watched videos on the pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes outside of the classroom, followed by an in-class session in which they engaged in case-based discussions. The intervention was evaluated using surveys and a knowledge test before, immediately after and 6 months after the intervention.RESULTS: The mean number of correct answers for a 10-question knowledge test was 5.25 before the intervention, 8.00 in the immediate post-intervention test, and 7.10 in the 6-month follow-up test (p<0.001). Six months after the intervention, 57.1% of participants reported prescribing an antidiabetic medication discussed at the session. In a focus group, trainees reported their preference for interactive, case-based learning, concern about the time required for preparation and interest in incorporating real patient cases.DISCUSSION: Trainees preferred the flipped classroom, which also resulted in increased knowledge and self-reported prescribing changes; however, the required preparatory time may limit its feasibility in GME.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/tct.13091

    View details for PubMedID 31512400

  • Asking what do residents value most: a recent overview of internal medicine residents' learning preferences. Advances in medical education and practice Caton, J. B., Pelletier, S. R., Shields, H. M. 2018; 9: 509?18

    Abstract

    Little is known about the preferred learning experiences of today's internal medicine residents. We conducted a survey of the educational experiences in an internal medicine residency to determine the learning opportunities internal medicine residents value most and why.An online, anonymous survey of 182 internal medicine residents was performed, with each resident receiving a survey each day over nine days. Participants were asked to state their most valuable learning experience over the past day, describe why it was valuable, and rank it on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Resident free-text responses were coded and grouped into themes. The location of and participants in the experience were also examined.The 182 residents completed a total of 303 surveys. Of the 303 surveys, 92% (N=277) of the responses noted their chosen learning experience was useful. An attending was involved in 50% (N=152) of experiences; the patient was noted as a participant in 8% (N=25) of experiences. Free-text responses were coded into five thematic groups descriptive of why residents found their learning experiences to be valuable: Repetition in Learning, Effective Pedagogy, Clinical Problem Solving as an Individual or Collaboratively, Opportunity for Active Engagement, and Bedside Learning.Our data provide a broader framework for designing and implementing future faculty development and resident curricula that emphasize interprofessional education and the patient as a key educational figure.

    View details for DOI 10.2147/AMEP.S165717

    View details for PubMedID 30013419

    View details for PubMedCentralID PMC6040631

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