Bio

Bio


Dr. Roh is a sports medicine specialist treating sports-related injuries from weekend warriors to professional athletes and Olympians with non-operative treatments including innovative ultrasound-guided minimally invasive interventions and "regenerative medicine." These procedures treat injuries in the shoulder, elbow, achilles and other joints.
He serves as a team physician for many elite sports teams including Stanford varsity and Team USA during the Olympic games. He also acted as a medical director for international events including the world ice hockey championship.

Dr. Roh?s research interests include non-surgical treatment outcome including "regenerative medicine" and application of ultrasound to assess tendinopathy and other musculoskeletal injuries.

Clinical Focus


  • Non-operative Biologic treatment(PRP, Fat derived graft or bone marrow)
  • Sports Injuries
  • Musculoskeletal and Sports Ultrasound Medicine
  • Tendinopathy
  • Physical Medicine and Rehab
  • Musculoskeletal Regenerative Medicine
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • SF 49ers, Consultant in Sports ultrasound and Orthobiologics injection treatment, Stanford University Sports Medicine (2013 - Present)
  • Golden State Warriors, Consultant in Sports ultrasound and Orthobiologics injection treatment, Stanford University Sports Medicine (2014 - Present)
  • Team Physician, Stanford Athletic Department (2013 - Present)
  • Site Director, Residency Program PM&R, Stanford (2015 - Present)
  • Director, Stanford Musculoskeletal Sports Ultrasound Medicine Service (2011 - Present)
  • Member and Venue Medical Officer, 2018 Winter Olympic Organizing Committee, Medical division (2016 - Present)
  • Team Physician, USOC Team USA for 2018 Olympic games (2017 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Best Teaching Award, Stanford PM&R (2016)
  • Arbor Free Clinic Chief Resident Award, Stanford University, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (2010)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Faculty and Mentor, Stanford ACGME PM&R Sports Medicine Fellowship (2011 - Present)
  • Primary team physician, Stanford Athletics (2011 - Present)
  • Committee Member, Stanford PM&R Education committee (2011 - Present)
  • Didactics organizer, Stanford PM&R Resident Musculoskeletal (2011 - Present)
  • Reviewer, Journal of Ultrasound Medicine (2014 - Present)
  • Member, American Registry For Diagnostic Medical Sonography (2011 - Present)
  • Member, Association of Academic Physiatrists (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Association of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Association of Pain Management in Ultrasound (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Board of Internal Medicine (2011 - Present)
  • Member, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (2011 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency:MetroWest Medical Center Transitional Year (2007) MA
  • Board Certification: Sports Medicine, American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehab (2012)
  • Residency:Stanford Hospital and Clinics (2010) CA
  • Fellowship:Harvard Medical School MGH - Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital (2011) MA
  • Medical Education:Yonsei University College Of Medicine (1999) South Korea
  • Board Certification, Sports Medicine, American Board of PM&R, ABFM (2012)
  • Board Certification, Musculoskeletal Ultrasound, ARDMS (American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography) (2012)
  • Board Certification: Physical Medicine and Rehab, American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehab (2011)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2007)

Community and International Work


  • 2018 Winter Olympic games

    Topic

    Team USA physician

    Partnering Organization(s)

    USOC

    Populations Served

    Olympians

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • 2018 Winter Olympic Organization, South Korea

    Topic

    Test Events for Olympic games

    Partnering Organization(s)

    PyeongChang Organizing Committee for the 2018 Olympic & Paralympic Winter Games

    Populations Served

    Athletes

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS

1. Peer-reviewed articles

1.Steele K, Roh EY, Ladd A, Rose J. Rotational velocity of the elite golf swing: Benchmarks for amateurs. Journal of Applied Biomechanics. Submitted.

2. Poster presentation and abstract

1. Lyly Minh, Roh EY, Distal Clavicular Osteolysis Associated with Hand-to- Hand and Combat: A Case Report, 2013 AAPM&R annual assembly
2. Dutton R, Klima R, Roh EY. Pelvic Digit As An Unusual Cause of Hip Pain: A Case Report, 2013 AAPM&R annual assembly
3. Patel A, Roh EY, Radicular Pain: A case Report, 2012 AAPM&R annual assembly
4. Roh EY, Mitra R. Chronic refractory coccydynia secondary to pilonidal cyst: A Case Report, 2010 AAPM&R annual assembly
5. Roh EY, Kay J. Use of digital pen and paper technology for collection of patient reported symptom and functional status improves physician documentation. Poster. 2005 American College of Rheumatology annual assembly.
6.Roh EY, Davis J. Clinical Characteristics of a US cohort of spondylitis patients. 2004 American College of Rheumatology annual assembly.
7.Roh EY, Tethered cord development following conservative management of acute spinal epidural hematoma. 2015 AAP Annual Meeting

Clinical Trials


  • Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis Recruiting

    This is a non-surgical trial comparing the clinical and functional outcomes of patients with osteoarthritis treated with Intra-articular injection of autologous Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSC) versus conventional therapy of intra-articular injection of corticosteroid.

    View full details

Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


  • PM& R Sports Medicine (Fellowship Program)

Publications

All Publications


  • Ultrasonographic measurement of the cross-sectional area of the axillary nerve MUSCLE & NERVE Yoon, J., Park, J., Levin, J., Roh, E. Y., Park, H., Won, S. 2019; 60 (1): 95?98

    View details for DOI 10.1002/mus.26480

    View details for Web of Science ID 000471831900023

  • ULTRASONOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENT OF THE CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF THE AXILLARY NERVE. Muscle & nerve Yoon, J. S., Park, J. H., Levin, J., Roh, E. Y., Park, H. J., Won, S. J. 2019

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to determine normal reference values for ultrasonographic measurement of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the axillary nerve and to standardize the measurement methods.METHODS: Sixty healthy volunteers were evaluated. Ultrasonography was performed with the shoulder positioned in 100░-120░ abduction and 90░ external rotation. The CSA of the axillary nerve was measured bilaterally.RESULTS: The normal CSA of the right axillary nerve was 2.9 ▒ 1.1 mm2 . The side-to-side discrepancy was 22.8% ▒ 17.8%.DISCUSSION: These reference values may be helpful for investigating pathologies involving the axillary nerve.

    View details for PubMedID 30927449

  • Golf Swing Rotational Velocity: The Essential Follow-Through ANNALS OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE-ARM Steele, K. M., Roh, E. Y., Mahtani, G., Meister, D. W., Ladd, A. L., Rose, J. 2018; 42 (5): 713?21
  • Golf Swing Rotational Velocity: The Essential Follow-Through. Annals of rehabilitation medicine Steele, K. M., Roh, E. Y., Mahtani, G., Meister, D. W., Ladd, A. L., Rose, J. 2018; 42 (5): 713?21

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if shoulder and pelvic angular velocities differ at impact or peak magnitude between professional and amateur golfers. Golf swing rotational biomechanics are a key determinant of power generation, driving distance, and injury prevention. We hypothesize that shoulder and pelvic angular velocities would be highly consistent in professionals.METHODS: Rotational velocities of the upper-torso and pelvis throughout the golf swing and in relation to phases of the golf swing were examined in 11 professionals and compared to 5 amateurs using three-dimensional motion analysis.RESULTS: Peak rotational velocities of professionals were highly consistent, demonstrating low variability (coefficient of variation [COV]), particularly upper-torso rotational velocity (COV=0.086) and pelvic rotational velocity (COV=0.079) during down swing. Peak upper-torso rotational velocity and peak X-prime, the relative rotational velocity of uppertorso versus pelvis, occurred after impact in follow-through, were reduced in amateurs compared to professionals (p=0.005 and p=0.005, respectively) and differentiated professionals from most (4/5) amateurs. In contrast, peak pelvic rotational velocity occurred in down swing. Pelvic velocity at impact was reduced in amateurs compared to professionals (p=0.019) and differentiated professionals from most (4/5) amateurs.CONCLUSION: Golf swing rotational velocity of professionals was consistent in pattern and magnitude, offering benchmarks for amateurs. Understanding golf swing rotational biomechanics can guide swing modifications to help optimize performance and prevent injury.

    View details for PubMedID 30404420

  • Use of F-18-sodium fluoride bone PET for disability evaluation in ankle trauma: a pilot study BMC MEDICAL IMAGING Jeon, T., Kim, S., Park, J., Park, J., Roh, E. Y. 2018; 18: 34

    Abstract

    There are no objective and accurate rating tools for permanent impairment of traumatized ankles. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of 18F-Sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) bone scans in evaluating patients with limited ankle range of motion (ROM) after trauma.18F-NaF PET/CT was performed in 121 patients (75 men, 46 women; mean age: 45.8) who had ROM ?2.5 was automatically obtained from the 3D volume that included the ankle joint. The maximum & mean SUV (SUVmax & SUVmean), and the total lesion activity (TLA) were measured.The median period from injury to performing 18F-NaF PET/CT was 290ádays. The causes of injury were as follows: fracture (N?=?95), Achilles tendon rupture (N?=?12), and ligament injury (N?=?12). Hot uptake in the ankle was seen in 113 of 121 patients. The fracture group had higher SUVmax, SUVmean, and TLA values than the non-fracture group. More limited ROM correlated with higher hot-uptake parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, TLA). In subgroup analysis, the same correlations were present in the fracture, but not in the non-fracture group.18F-NaF PET/CT can provide considerable information in impairment evaluations of limited ankle ROM, particularly in fracture around the ankle. Thus, 18F-NaF bone PET/CT may provide an additional option as an objective imaging tool in disability assessment after ankle injury.

    View details for PubMedID 30236078

  • Poster 156 Synovial Osteochondromatosis as a Rare Cause of Hip Pain: A Case Report. PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation Pun, M., Roh, E. Y. 2016; 8 (9S): S213-?

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.07.197

    View details for PubMedID 27672924

  • Comparison of Muscle Onset Activation Sequences between a Golf or Tennis Swing and Common Training Exercises Using Surface Electromyography: A Pilot Study. Journal of sports medicine (Hindawi Publishing Corporation) Vasudevan, J. M., Logan, A., Shultz, R., Koval, J. J., Roh, E. Y., Fredericson, M. 2016; 2016: 3987486-?

    Abstract

    Aim. The purpose of this pilot study is to use surface electromyography to determine an individual athlete's typical muscle onset activation sequence when performing a golf or tennis forward swing and to use the method to assess to what degree the sequence is reproduced with common conditioning exercises and a machine designed for this purpose. Methods. Data for 18 healthy male subjects were collected for 15 muscles of the trunk and lower extremities. Data were filtered and processed to determine the average onset of muscle activation for each motion. A Spearman correlation estimated congruence of activation order between the swing and each exercise. Correlations of each group were pooled with 95% confidence intervals using a random effects meta-analytic strategy. Results. The averaged sequences differed among each athlete tested, but pooled correlations demonstrated a positive association between each exercise and the participants' natural muscle onset activation sequence. Conclusion. The selected training exercises and Turning Point? device all partially reproduced our athletes' averaged muscle onset activation sequences for both sports. The results support consideration of a larger, adequately powered study using this method to quantify to what degree each of the selected exercises is appropriate for use in both golf and tennis.

    View details for DOI 10.1155/2016/3987486

    View details for PubMedID 27403454

  • The Relationship between Golf Swing Trunk Rotation Biomechanics and Low Back Pain in Golfers Spineline Said, M., Johnson, E., Roh, E. 2013; Sep Oct: 21-26
  • Preseason Training for Golfers with Low Back Pain Spineline Roh Eugene Y, Geraci M, Smuck M 2012; Jan Feb: 17-21
  • Basic Appearance of Ultrasound Structures and Pitfalls PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA McDonald, S., Fredericson, M., Roh, E. Y., Smuck, M. 2010; 21 (3): 461-?

    Abstract

    The role of ultrasound in musculoskeletal imaging is expanding as technology advances and clinicians become better educated about its clinical applications. The main use of musculoskeletal ultrasound to physiatrists is to examine the soft tissues of the body and to diagnose pathologic changes. Ultrasound can be used to assist clinicians in performing interventional procedures. However, to successfully integrate this technology into their clinical practices, physicians must be familiar with the normal and abnormal appearance of tissues. They also must recognize the clinically relevant limitations and pitfalls associated with the use of ultrasound.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.pmr.2010.04.002

    View details for PubMedID 20797545

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