Bio

Bio


I am interested in investigating the role of stress and emotion regulatory system in chronic pain and substance use. Ultimately, I want to develop mechanisms-based psychological interventions for patients suffering from chronic pain to optimize pain management strategies with less medications and substances and to help patients live meaningful life.

Clinical Focus


  • Psychologist

Academic Appointments


  • Instructor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

Professional Education


  • Internship:Wright State University School of Psychology (2017) OH
  • PhD Training:Texas A and M University Office of the Registrar (2017) TX
  • Fellowship:Stanford University Division of Pain MedicineCA
  • BSN, Hanyang University, Nursing (1997)
  • BA, Case Western Reserve University, Psychology (2007)
  • MS, Texas A&M University, Clinical Psychology (2012)
  • PhD, Texas A&M University, Clinical Psychology (2017)

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Pain Catastrophizing and Prescription Opioid Craving Not Recruiting

    Adherence to prescription opioid and opioid tapering as indicated are critical for safe chronic opioid therapy for chronic pain, but this can be difficult for patients experiencing prescription opioid craving. Because pain catastrophizing is proposed as a possible treatment target by our and others' preliminary results, the proposed study aims to determine whether pain catastrophizing is a treatment target to reduce prescription opioid craving and to investigate whether negative affect and stress hormones are potential mediators. The findings from the current study will inform whether a psychology intervention to lower pain catastrophizing will reduce opioid craving, and whether psychological and physical distress will be potential mediators of the treatment effect.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial. For more information, please contact SNAPL lab, 650-723-8346.

    View full details

Publications

All Publications


  • Evaluation of the Preliminary Validity of Misuse of Prescription Pain Medication Items from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)(R) PAIN MEDICINE You, D., Hah, J. M., Collins, S., Ziadni, M. S., Domingue, B. W., Cook, K. F., Mackey, S. C. 2019; 20 (10): 1925?33

    View details for DOI 10.1093/pm/pnz001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000498052000007

  • International Stakeholder Community of Pain Experts and Leaders Call for an Urgent Action on Forced Opioid Tapering PAIN MEDICINE Darnall, B. D., Juurlink, D., Kerns, R. D., Mackey, S., Van Dorsten, B., Humphreys, K., Gonzalez-Sotomayor, J. A., Furlan, A., Gordon, A. J., Gordon, D. B., Hoffman, D. E., Katz, J., Kertesz, S. G., Satel, S., Lawhern, R. A., Nicholson, K. M., Polomano, R. C., Williamson, O. D., McAnally, H., Kao, M., Schug, S., Twillman, R., Lewis, T. A., Stieg, R. L., Lorig, K., Mallick-Searle, T., West, R. W., Gray, S., Ariens, S. R., Potter, J., Cowan, P., Kollas, C. D., Laird, D., Ingle, B., Grove, J., Wilson, M., Lockman, K., Hodson, F., Palackdharry, C. S., Fillingim, R. B., Fudin, J., Barnhouse, J., Manhapra, A., Henson, S. R., Singer, B., Ljosenvoor, M., Griffith, M., Doctor, J. N., Hardin, K., London, C., Mankowski, J., Anderson, A., Ellsworth, L., Budzinski, L., Brandt, B., Hartley, G., Heck, D., Zobrosky, M. J., Cheek, C., Wilson, M., Laux, C. E., Datz, G., Dunaway, J., Schonfeld, E., Cady, M., LeDantec-Boswell, T., Craigie, M., Sturgeon, J., Flood, P., Giummarra, M., Whelan, J., Thorn, B. E., Martin, R. L., Schatman, M. E., Gregory, M. D., Kirz, J., Robinson, P., Marx, J. G., Stewart, J. R., Keck, P. S., Hadland, S. E., Murphy, J. L., Lumley, M. A., Brown, K. S., Leong, M. S., Fillman, M., Broatch, J. W., Perez, A., Watford, K., Kruska, K., You, D., Ogbeide, S., Kukucka, A., Lawson, S., Ray, J. B., Martin, T., Lakehomer, J. B., Burke, A., Cohen, R. I., Grinspoon, P., Rubenstein, M. S., Sutherland, S., Walters, K., Lovejoy, T. 2019; 20 (3): 429?33

    View details for DOI 10.1093/pm/pny228

    View details for Web of Science ID 000467966600003

  • Negative Affect-Related Factors Have the Strongest Association with Prescription Opioid Misuse in a Cross-Sectional Cohort of Patients with Chronic Pain. Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.) Gilam, G., Sturgeon, J. A., You, D. S., Wasan, A. D., Darnall, B. D., Mackey, S. C. 2019

    Abstract

    Increased opioid prescription to relieve pain among patients with chronic pain is associated with increased risk for misuse, potentially leading to substance use disorders and overdose death. We aimed to characterize the relative importance and identify the most significant of several potential risk factors for the severity of self-reported prescribed opioid misuse behaviors.A sample of 1,193 patients (mean age SD?=?50.72??14.97 years, 64.04% female) with various chronic pain conditions completed a multidimensional registry assessing four pain severity measures and 14 physical, mental, and social health status factors using the National Institutes of Health's Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). A validated PROMIS measure of medication misuse was completed by 692 patients who endorsed currently taking opioid medication. Patients taking opioid medications were compared across all measures with those who do not take opioid medications. Subsequently, a data-driven regression analysis was used to determine which measures best explained variability in severity of misuse. We hypothesized that negative affect-related factors, namely anxiety, anger, and/or depression, would be key predictors of misuse severity due to their crucial role in chronic pain and substance use disorders.Patients taking opioid medications had significantly greater impairment across most measures. Above and beyond demographic variables, the only and most significant predictors of prescribed opioid misuse severity were as follows: anxiety (??=?0.15, P?=?0.01), anger (??=?0.13, P?=?0.02), Pain Intensity-worst (??=?0.09, P?=?0.02), and depression (??=?0.13, P?=?0.04).Findings suggest that anxiety, anger, and depression are key factors associated with prescribed opioid misuse tendencies in patients with chronic pain and that they are potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/pm/pnz249

    View details for PubMedID 31617916

  • Evaluation of Candidate Items for Severe PTSD Screening for Patients with Chronic Pain: Pilot Data Analysis with IRT Approach. Pain practice : the official journal of World Institute of Pain You, D. S., Ziadni, M. S., Gilam, G., Darnall, B. D., Mackey, S. C. 2019

    Abstract

    Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) commonly co-occurs with chronic pain. Although PTSD symptoms are associated with negative health outcomes in patients with chronic pain, PTSD is typically under-detected and under-treated in outpatient pain settings. There is a need for rapid, brief screening tools to identify those at greatest risk for severe PTSD symptoms. To achieve that goal, our aim was to use item response theory (IRT) to identify the most informative PTSD symptoms characterizing severe PTSD in patients with chronic pain.Fifty-six patients (71% female, 61% White) with mixed etiology chronic pain completed the PTSD Checklist Civilian Version (PCL-C) as part of their appointment with a pain psychologist at a tertiary outpatient pain clinic. We used an IRT approach to evaluate each item's discriminant (a) and severity (b) parameters.Findings revealed that 'feeling upset at reminders' (a = 3.67, b = 2.44) and 'avoid thinking or talking about it' (a = 3.61, b = 2.17) as being highly discriminant for severe PTSD.We identified two candidate items for a brief PTSD screener as they were associated with severe PTSD symptoms. These two items may provide clinical utility in outpatient pain treatment settings to identify those suffering from severe PTSD enabling physicians to refer them to trauma-specific evaluation or therapy. Future research is needed to further validate and confirm these candidate PTSD items in a larger clinic sample.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/papr.12848

    View details for PubMedID 31646748

  • CARE Scale - 7: Development and preliminary validation of a measure assessing factors that impact self-care in chronic pain Clin J Pain Ziadni, M., You, S., Wilson, A., Darnall, B. 2018; March

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: