Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Nephrology
  • Global Health
  • Palliative Care

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Nephrology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2017)
  • Fellowship: Stanford University Nephrology Fellowship (2017) CA
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2015)
  • Residency: Beth Israel Medical Center (2015) NY
  • Medical Education: University of Louisville Medical School (2012) KY
  • Master of Science, Stanford University, EPIDM-MS (2019)
  • Bachelor of Science, Georgetown College (2007)

Community and International Work


  • Reducing transmission of HIV/AIDS in Morocco

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Association de lutte contre le Sida

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Paying for Hemodialysis in Kerala, India: A Survey of Effects on Household Finances

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Centre for Chronic Disease Control

    Populations Served

    South Asians with end-stage renal disease

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Dr. Bradshaw is interested in studying counseling practices and transitions of care among persons with advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in low- and middle-income countries.

Publications

All Publications


  • Medical Record Documentation of Goals-of-Care Discussions Among Older Veterans With Incident Kidney Failure. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation Bradshaw, C. L., Gale, R. C., Chettiar, A., Ghaus, S. J., Thomas, I., Fung, E., Lorenz, K., Asch, S. M., Anand, S., Kurella Tamura, M. 2019

    Abstract

    RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE: Elicitation and documentation of patient preferences is at the core of shared decision making and is particularly important among patients with high anticipated mortality. The extent to which older patients with incident kidney failure undertake such discussions with their providers is unknown and its characterization was the focus of this study.STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of veterans 67 years and older with incident kidney failure receiving care from the US Veterans Health Administration between 2005 and2010.EXPOSURES: Demographic and facility characteristics, as well as predicted 6-month mortality risk after dialysis initiation and documentation of resuscitation preferences.OUTCOMES: Documented discussions of dialysis treatment and supportive care.ANALYTICAL APPROACH: We reviewed medical records over the 2 years before incident kidney failure and up to 1 year afterward to ascertain the frequency and timing of documented discussions about dialysis treatment, supportive care, and resuscitation. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with these documented discussions.RESULTS: The cohort of 821 veterans had a mean age of 80.97.2 years, and 37.2% had a predicted 6-month mortality risk>20% with dialysis. Documented discussions addressing dialysis treatment and resuscitation were present in 55.6% and 77.1% of patients, respectively. Those addressing supportive care were present in 32.4%. The frequency of documentation varied by mortality risk and whether the patient ultimately started dialysis. In adjusted analyses, the frequency and pattern of documentation were more strongly associated with geographic location and receipt of outpatient nephrology care than with patient demographic or clinical characteristics.LIMITATIONS: Documentation may not fully reflect the quality and content of discussions, and generalizability to nonveteran patients is limited.CONCLUSIONS: Among older veterans with incident kidney failure, discussions of dialysis treatment are decoupled from other aspects of advance care planning and are suboptimally documented, even among patients at high risk for mortality.

    View details for DOI 10.1053/j.ajkd.2019.07.024

    View details for PubMedID 31679746

  • Paying for Hemodialysis in Kerala, India: A Description of Household Financial Hardship in the Context of Medical Subsidy KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL REPORTS Bradshaw, C., Gracious, N., Narayanan, R., Narayanan, S., Safeer, M., Nair, G. M., Murlidharan, P., Sundaresan, A., Santhi, S., Prabhakaran, D., Tamura, M., Jha, V., Chertow, G. M., Jeemon, P., Anand, S. 2019; 4 (3): 390?98
  • Early detection of chronic kidney disease in low-income and middle-income countries: development and validation of a point-of-care screening strategy for India. BMJ global health Bradshaw, C., Kondal, D., Montez-Rath, M. E., Han, J., Zheng, Y., Shivashankar, R., Gupta, R., Srinivasapura Venkateshmurthy, N., Jarhyan, P., Mohan, S., Mohan, V., Ali, M. K., Patel, S., Venkat Narayan, K. M., Tandon, N., Prabhakaran, D., Anand, S. 2019; 4 (5): e001644

    Abstract

    Introduction: Although deaths due to chronic kidney disease (CKD) have doubled over the past two decades, few data exist to inform screening strategies for early detection of CKD in low-income and middle-income countries.Methods: Using data from three population-based surveys in India, we developed a prediction model to identify a target population that could benefit from further CKD testing, after an initial screening implemented during home health visits. Using data from one urban survey (n=8698), we applied stepwise logistic regression to test three models: one comprised of demographics, self-reported medical history, anthropometry and point-of-care (urine dipstick or capillary glucose) tests; one with demographics and self-reported medical history and one with anthropometry and point-of-care tests. The 'gold-standard' definition of CKD was an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60mL/min/1.73m2 or urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ?30mg/g. Models were internally validated via bootstrap. The most parsimonious model with comparable performance was externally validated on distinct urban (n=5365) and rural (n=6173) Indian cohorts.Results: A model with age, sex, waist circumference, body mass index and urine dipstick had a c-statistic of 0.76 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78) for predicting need for further CKD testing, with external validation c-statistics of 0.74 and 0.70 in the urban and rural cohorts, respectively. At a probability cut-point of 0.09, sensitivity was 71% (95% CI 68% to 74%) and specificity was 70% (95% CI 69% to 71%). The model captured 71% of persons with CKD and 90% of persons at highest risk of complications from untreated CKD (ie, CKD stage 3A2 and above).Conclusion: A point-of-care CKD screening strategy using three simple measures can accurately identify high-risk persons who require confirmatory kidney function testing.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bmjgh-2019-001644

    View details for PubMedID 31544000

  • Acute Kidney Injury in Children Hospitalized With Diarrheal Illness in the United States. Hospital pediatrics Bradshaw, C., Han, J., Chertow, G. M., Long, J., Sutherland, S. M., Anand, S. 2019

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, correlates, and consequences of acute kidney injury (AKI) among children hospitalized with diarrheal illness in the United States.METHODS: Using data from Kids' Inpatient Database in 2009 and 2012, we studied children hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of diarrheal illness (weighted N = 113195). We used the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, diagnosis codes 584.5 to 584.9 to capture AKI. We calculated the incidence, correlates, and consequences (mortality, length of stay [LOS], and costs) of AKI associated with hospitalized diarrheal illness using stepwise logistic regression and generalized linear models.RESULTS: The average incidence of AKI in children hospitalized with diarrheal illness was 0.8%. Hospital location and teaching status were associated with the odds of AKI, as were older age, solid organ transplant, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and rheumatologic and hematologic conditions. The development of AKI in hospitalized diarrheal illness was associated with an eightfold increase in the odds of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 8.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.2-15.4). AKI was associated with prolonged LOS (mean increase 3.0 days; 95% CI 2.3-3.8) and higher hospital cost (mean increase $9241; 95% CI $4661-$13820).CONCLUSIONS: Several demographic factors and comorbid conditions are associated with the risk of AKI in children hospitalized with diarrheal illness. Although rare, development of AKI in this common pediatric condition is associated with increased mortality, LOS, and hospital cost.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/hpeds.2019-0220

    View details for PubMedID 31771950

  • Acute Kidney Injury Due to Diarrheal Illness Requiring Hospitalization: Data from the National Inpatient Sample JOURNAL OF GENERAL INTERNAL MEDICINE Bradshaw, C., Zheng, Y., Silver, S. A., Chertow, G. M., Long, J., Anand, S. 2018; 33 (9): 1520?27
  • Pituitary tumor transforming gene: An important gene in normal cellular functions and tumorigenesis HISTOLOGY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY Bradshaw, C., Kakar, S. S. 2007; 22 (2): 219?26

    Abstract

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene which is found to be highly expressed in proliferating cells and in most of the tumors analyzed to date. Overexpression of PTTG induces cellular transformation and promotes tumor development in nude mice. PTTG is regulated by various growth factors including insulin and IGF-1. PTTG is a multifunctional and multidomain protein. Some of the functions of PTTG include inhibition of separation of sister chromatids, expression and secretion of angiogenic and metastatic factors. In this review we focus on expression of PTTG in normal and tumor tissues, define its biological function, its role in tumorigenesis, and its interaction with other proteins that may play important role in mediating tumorigenic function of PTTG.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000242576600012

    View details for PubMedID 17149695

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