School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 39 Results

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Luby?s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries. He works primarily in Bangladesh.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr David M. Maahs is Professor of Pediatrics and Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico?s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado?s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs? leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as a Steering Committee member and Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as Secretary-General for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2016-20) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He currently serves on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ?Pink Panther,? which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, and prevent diabetic complications. He is author or co-author of over 250 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their children, Nicholas (20) and Natalia (15).

  • Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests: (i) genetic and environmental determinants of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, (ii) transdisciplinary strategies for improving population health.

  • Michelle Odden

    Michelle Odden

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio Michelle Odden, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Health Research and Policy. Her research aims to improve our understanding of the optimal preventive strategies for chronic disease in older adults, particularly those who have been underrepresented in research including the very old, frail, and racial/ethnic minorities. Her work has focused on prevention of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes, as well as preservation of physical and cognitive function in older adults. She is also strongly interested in epidemiological and statistical methods to reduce biases in observational studies. Dr. Odden came to Stanford from Oregon State University, where she helped build the new College of Public Health and Human Sciences. She completed her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley (2009), a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco in Primary Care Research (2011).

  • Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Palaniappan has completed over 80 studies spanning 20 years in diverse and understudied populations, chronic disease, and prevention. She has expertise in epidemiological research using large databases, use of electronic health records for research, and clinical trials.

  • Lesley Park

    Lesley Park

    Instructor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences (PHS)
    Associate Director, Education (2019-present)
    Director, PHS Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-present)
    Associate Director, Research and Data Strategy (2016-2019)

    Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
    Cancer Core Co-Director

    Dr. Lesley Park is one of the leaders of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences and the VACS Cancer Core. PHS aims to provide a central hub where researchers can efficiently access, link, visualize, and analyze data from a wide variety of sources to ultimately facilitate transdisciplinary population health science research. Within the VACS, Dr. Park oversees cancer outcomes research in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Her research experience has focused on the intersection of cancer and HIV, examining epidemiologic methods for cancer research, cancer incidence trends, and cancer (particularly hepatocellular carcinoma) prevention in PLWHA. Dr. Park is an experienced epidemiologist, skilled in observational research, survival analysis, and SAS programming. Her prior experience includes research at the Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research (CBAR) at the Harvard School of Public Health and at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Rita Popat

    Rita Popat

    Clinical Associate Professor, Health Research & Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest focuses on the epidemiology of Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, specifically evaluating the genetic and environmental contributions to these neurodegenerative disorders. I am also interested in studying the relation of cognition, estradiol exposure (endogenous and exogenous), and genetic factors.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: