School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 39 Results

  • Ann Hsing

    Ann Hsing

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center/Cancer Institute) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Focus
    ? Epidemiology of prostate, hepatobiliary, and thyroid cancers
    ? Racial disparities in cancer
    ? Endogenous hormones/growth factors
    ? Circadian rhythms
    ? Chronic inflammation
    ? Genetic susceptibility
    ? Cancer prevention and control
    ? Global oncology and international studies

  • Erik Ingelsson

    Erik Ingelsson

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the link between metabolic disturbances, such as obesity and insulin resistance, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Our research is translational and interdisciplinary, combining population-based studies with molecular biology to reach new insights into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and related conditions, identification of new biomarkers for improved risk prediction, and discovery of novel drug targets.

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    C. F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Meta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My interests include applications of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Arthropod-borne viruses are emerging and re-emerging infections that are spreading throughout the world. Our laboratory investigates the epidemiology of arboviral infections, focusing on the burden of disease and the long-term complications on human health. In particular, Dr. LaBeaud investigates dengue, chikungunya, and Rift Valley fever viruses in Kenya, where outbreaks cause fever, arthritis, retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. Our main research questions focus on the risk factors for arboviral infections, the development of diagnostic tests that can be administered in the field to quickly determine what kind of arboviral infection a person has, and the genetic and immunologic investigation of why different people respond differently to the same infection. Our long-term goals are to contribute to a deeper understanding of arboviral infections and their long-term health consequences and to optimize control strategies to prevent these emerging infections. Our laboratory also investigates the effects of antenatal and postnatal parasitic infections on vaccine responses, growth, and development of Kenyan children.

    My lab at Stanford supports the field work that is ongoing in Kenya, but we also have several projects that are based locally. We strive to improve diagnostics of arboviral infections and are using Luminex technology to build a new screening assay. We also have created a Luminex based platform to assess vaccine responses against multiple pathogens.

  • Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical scientist (PhD epidemiology), endocrinologist, and CMO at VAPA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center . My group does pattern and prediction mapping along the life-course of interventions/outcomes and how healthcare system can positively impact health longitudinally. We use novel molecular epi, 'big' data like EHRs with advanced new designs/methods/technologies. These interests cut across multiple complex chronic diseases, aging, & critical lifespan stages.

  • Mary Leonard

    Mary Leonard

    Arline and Pete Harman Professor and Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My multidisciplinary research program is focused on (1) the detrimental effects of glucocorticoids, sarcopenia and inflammation on bone development in pediatric diseases, (2) the long-term effects of childhood cancer on bone and muscle quality, (3) the assessment of renal osteodystrophy using novel micro-imaging techniques, (4) the effects of vitamin D deficiency on physical function and cardiovascular disease, and (5) the evaluation of biomechanical interventions as anabolic bone therapies.

  • Eleni Linos, MD, MPH, DrPH

    Eleni Linos, MD, MPH, DrPH

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio Eleni Linos MD, MPH, DrPH, is Professor of Dermatology at Stanford University. Her work focuses on public health, cancer prevention and geriatric dermatology. Dr. Linos is dually trained in epidemiology and dermatology and is the principal investigator of several NIH funded studies aimed at improving the lives of patients with skin disease. She received her medical degree from Cambridge and Oxford universities in the UK, then trained in epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and completed her dermatology residency at Stanford.

  • Ying Lu

    Ying Lu

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging) and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biostatistics, clinical trials, statistical evaluation of medical diagnostic tests, radiology, osteoporosis, meta-analysis, medical decisoin making

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