School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 151 Results

  • Alin Lucian Girnita

    Alin Lucian Girnita

    Clinical Professor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Alin Girnita received his MD/PhD degrees from the University of Medicine in Craiova, Romania, where he was board certified in cardiovascular surgery. He completed his fellowship in transplantation immunology, histocompatibility and immunogenetics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical center, where he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Pathology and Associate Director of HLA lab. Between 2009-2019, Dr. Girnita was an Associate Professor, and then Professor of Surgery and Director of Transplant Immunology Division at University of Cincinnati. Since November 2019, he was recruited as a Professor of Pathology at Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Girnita has authored over 40 scientific articles that have been cited over 1500 times. His research interest involves the alloimmune response in solid-organ transplantation, markers of antibody-mediated rejection, influence of various therapeutic protocols on desensitization and alloimmune response, structural matching and genetic polymorphism in transplantation.

  • Bertil Glader

    Bertil Glader

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hematology/Oncology, biology, and treatment of bone marrow failure disorders, hereditary coagulation disorders-clinical trials.

  • Lawrence Tim Goodnough

    Lawrence Tim Goodnough

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving blood utilization
    Promoting alternatives to blood transfusion
    Quality improvements

  • Isabella Graef

    Isabella Graef

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in addressing questions in neuronal development and function by a combination of genetic, cell biological, biochemical and chemical approaches.
    The main focus of our lab is centered around two topics: 1) the interface of signaling and gene regulation in neuronal development, with a focus on calcineurin-NFAT signaling; 2) the development of small molecules, which interfere with protein-protein interactions underlying neurodegenerative diseases.

  • Dita Gratzinger

    Dita Gratzinger

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have research interests in the interaction of hematolymphoid neoplasia with the microenvironment. For example, I use a combination of immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and image analysis techniques to evaluate the mesenchymal stromal cell compartment in myelodysplastic syndrome (pre-leukemic bone marrow failure disorder). I also have interests in lymphoma vasculature and the tropism of lymphoma for specific types of vasculature.

  • Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Florette K. Gray Hazard

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My scholarly pursuits are primarily focused on the study of death and disease in the pediatric population. It is through this work that I am able to explore fundamental concepts of neoplasia, such as histogenesis and mutagenesis, while utilizing a variety of investigational techniques.

  • Michael Hendrickson

    Michael Hendrickson

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Diagnosis of progressive stages of uterine cancer; classification of ovarian tumors; breast cancer diagnosis and prognostic factors, soft tissue neoplasm, uterine mesenchymal neoplasm.

  • John Higgins

    John Higgins

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I work as a diagnostic surgical pathologist doing translational research in renal neoplasia and medical renal disease and neoplastic and medical liver disease. Subspecialty areas of clinical interest include diagnostic immunohistochemistry, renal, hepatic and transplant pathology.

  • Marie Hollenhorst, MD, PhD

    Marie Hollenhorst, MD, PhD

    Clinical Instructor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Hollenhorst is a physician and scientist with expertise in non-malignant hematology, transfusion medicine, and chemical biology. Dr. Hollenhorst values the one-on-one relationships that she forms with her patients, and strives to deliver the highest quality of care for individuals with blood diseases. Her experience caring for patients drives her to ask scientific questions in the laboratory, where she aims to bring a chemical approach to the study of non-malignant blood disease.

    Dr. Hollenhorst pursued combined MD and PhD training at Harvard University, where she received a PhD in Chemical Biology under the mentorship of Professor Christopher T Walsh. She subsequently completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, a fellowship in Transfusion Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and a fellowship in Hematology at Stanford.

    Dr. Hollenhorst has a particular interest in the biology of platelets, which are cellular fragments that help the blood to maintain a healthy balance between excessive bleeding and excessive clotting. Working in the laboratory of Professor Carolyn Bertozzi of Stanford Chemistry, Dr. Hollenhorst is studying sugar-containing molecules that are found within platelets and are important in controlling their function and lifespan.

    Dr. Hollenhorst's research is supported by a Stanford Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health Physician-Scientist Fellowship, a National Institutes of Health Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship, and a National Blood Foundation Early-Career Scientific Research Grant.

  • Dikran Horoupian

    Dikran Horoupian

    Professor (Clinical) of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuropathology of:
    1. Neurodegenerative diseases
    2. Neurodevelopmental disorders
    3. CNS neoplasms
    4. Nerve & muscle diseases

  • Brooke Howitt

    Brooke Howitt

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Howitt is a gynecologic and sarcoma pathologist, with academic interests in gynecologic mesenchymal tumors and morphologic and clinical correlates of molecular alterations in gynecologic neoplasia.

  • Michael Richard Howitt

    Michael Richard Howitt

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab is broadly interested in how intestinal microbes shape our immune system to promote both health and disease. Recently we discovered that a type of intestinal epithelial cell, called tuft cells, act as sentinels stationed along the lining of the gut. Tuft cells respond to microbes, including parasites, to initiate type 2 immunity, remodel the epithelium, and alter gut physiology. Surprisingly, these changes to the intestine rely on the same chemosensory pathway found in oral taste cells. Currently, we aim to 1) elucidate the role of specific tuft cell receptors in microbial detection. 2) To understand how protozoa and bacteria within the microbiota impact host immunity. 3) Discover how tuft cells modulate surrounding cells and tissue.

  • Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We identified a common disorder of aging called clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). CHIP occurs due to certain somatic mutations in blood stem cells and represents a precursor state for blood cancer, but is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. We hope to understand more about the biology and clinical implications of CHIP using human and model system studies.

  • Kristin Jensen

    Kristin Jensen

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Palo Alto Veteran's Health Care System and at Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical translational investigator with a primary interest in breast cancer biology, and the use of investigational and clinical ancillary techniques such as gene and tissue microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease. As a practicing cytopathologist, I also have an interest in improving the fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of breast lesions, again using immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis as adjuncts to cytomorphology.

  • Marisa Juntilla

    Marisa Juntilla

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research goal is to reveal novel biology in leukemia that links cancer cell metabolism to protein translation, ultimately providing new opportunities for personalized medicine and reduced chemotherapeutic toxicity.

  • Neeraja Kambham

    Neeraja Kambham

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Kambham's research interests primarily involve medical diseases and transplantation pathology of the kidney and liver.

  • Chia Sui Kao

    Chia Sui Kao

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genitourinary tumors with a special interest in Testicular tumors

  • Richard Kempson

    Richard Kempson

    Professor of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinicopathologic studies in endometrial carcinoma, ovarian neoplasms, and soft tissue tumors.

  • Christina Kong

    Christina Kong

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improving the accuracy of cytologic diagnosis through the use of ancillary techniques on specimens obtained by fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    Identifying potential indicators of prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Evaluating the utility of immunohistochemical stains in refining the diagnosis of squamous dysplasia of the cervix, vulva, and head and neck.

  • Jon Kosek

    Jon Kosek

    Professor (Clinical) of Pathology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Methods of evaluation of biopsies; differentiation and, classification of neoplasms; immunohistochemistry; scanning and, transmission electron microscopy; cardiovascular pathology;, histologic assessment of bone biopsies; heart preservation and, restoration; myocardial biopsies; venous autograft coronary artery, bypass; cardial and heart valve transplantation.

  • Anandi Krishnan

    Anandi Krishnan

    Instructor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Krishnan's current interests are in the transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of blood cell function and dysfunction in human disease. Her primary focus is on blood platelets with multifaceted function in cancer, inflammation or immunity; beyond their classical role in hemostasis and thrombosis.

    In the long term, her work aims to develop clinically-meaningful relationships between patient genomic variation, disease-specific transcriptomic variaton, and clinical phenotype in hematological diseases.

  • Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Joseph (Joe) Lipsick

    Professor of Pathology, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function and evolution of the Myb oncogene family; function and evolution of E2F transcriptional regulators and RB tumor suppressors; epigenetic regulation of chromatin and chromosomes; cancer genetics.

  • Jonathan Z. Long

    Jonathan Z. Long

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory studies mammalian energy and metabolic homeostasis. Our research combines classical in vitro bucket biochemistry, emerging chemical technologies, and genetic manipulations in cultured cells and in mice to uncover new pathways that control energy storage and energy use. Ultimately, we seek to translate our discoveries into therapeutic opportunities for metabolic and other chronic diseases.

  • Teri A Longacre

    Teri A Longacre

    Richard L. Kempson, MD, Professor in Surgical Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Gynecological, breast and gastrointestinal pathology with major emphasis on ovarian cancer and ovarian tumors of low malignant potential. Pathology of familial and hereditary breast-ovarian-GI cancer.

  • Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe

    Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Lowe joined the School of Medicine faculty in 2019. She received her undergraduate degree in Biology from MIT and her medical degree at UCSD, prior to residency and cytology fellowship at UCLA. In 2011, she joined the faculty at Brigham and Women's Hospital where she developed a research focus on Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) and the application of CTC technology to improve clinical diagnostics. Clinically, her interests focus on Cytopathology and Genitourinary Pathology.

  • Bingwei Lu

    Bingwei Lu

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in understanding how neural stem cells balance their self-renewal and differentiation and how deregulation of this process can result in brain tumor. We are also interested in mechanisms of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We are using both Drosophila and mammalian models to address these fundamental questions.

  • Sara Michie

    Sara Michie

    Professor of Pathology (Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Lymphocyte/endothelial cell adhesion mechanisms involved in lymphocyte migration to sites of inflammation; regulation of expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics, of Pathology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

  • Stephen B. Montgomery

    Stephen B. Montgomery

    Associate Professor of Pathology, and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We focus on understanding the effects of genome variation on cellular phenotypes and cellular modeling of disease through genomic approaches such as next generation RNA sequencing in combination with developing and utilizing state-of-the-art bioinformatics and statistical genetics approaches. See our website at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/

  • Thomas Montine

    Thomas Montine

    Stanford Medicine Pathology Professor

    Bio Dr. Montine received his education at Columbia University (BA in Chemistry), the University of Rochester (PhD in Pharmacology), and McGill University (MD and CM). His postgraduate medical training was at Duke University, and he was junior faculty at Vanderbilt University where he was awarded the Thorne Professorship in Pathology. In 2002, Dr. Montine was appointed as the Alvord Endowed Professor in Neuropathology and Director of the Division of Neuropathology at the University of Washington. He was Director of the University of Washington Alzheimer?s Disease Research Center, one of the original 10 Centers in the US, and passed that responsibility to able colleagues. In 2010, Dr. Montine was appointed Chair of the Department of Pathology at the University of Washington. In 2016, Dr. Montine was appointed Chair of the Department of Pathology at Stanford University where he is the Stanford Medicine Endowed Professor in Pathology.

    Dr. Montine is the founding Director of the Pacific Udall Center, one of 9 NINDS-funded Morris K. Udall Centers of Excellence for Parkinson?s Disease Research. Our center performs basic, translational, and clinical research focused on cognitive impairment in Parkinson?s disease. The Pacific Udall Center emphasizes a vision for precision health that comprises functional genomics, development of surveillance tools for pre-clinical detection, and discovery of molecularly tailored therapies.

    Dr. Montine is among the top recipients of NIH funding for all Department of Pathology faculty in the United States. He was the 2015 President of the American Association of Neuropathologists, and led or co-led recent NIH initiatives to revise diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer?s disease (NIA), develop research priorities for the National Alzheimer?s Plan (NINDS and NIA), and develop research priorities for Parkinson?s Disease (NINDS).

    The focus of the Montine Laboratory is on the structural and molecular bases of cognitive impairment with the goal of defining key pathogenic steps and thereby new therapeutic targets. The Montine Laboratory addresses these prevalent, unmet medical needs through a combination of neuropathology, biomarker development and application early in the course of disease, and experimental studies that test hypotheses concerning specific mechanisms of neuron injury and approaches to neuroprotection. PubMed lists 579 publications for Dr. Montine. Google Scholar estimates Dr. Montine?s citations as > 38,000, his i-10 index as 355, and his H-Index as 98. NIH iCite calculates (1995 to 2017) Dr. Montine?s weighted relative citation ratio as 2041.

  • Yasodha Natkunam, M.D., Ph.D

    Yasodha Natkunam, M.D., Ph.D

    Ronald F. Dorfman, MBBch, FRCPath Professor in Hematopathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on the identification and characterization of markers of diagnostic and prognostic importance in hematolymphoid neoplasia.

  • Roberto Novoa, MD

    Roberto Novoa, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include the medical applications of artificial intelligence, cutaneous lymphoma, and the side effects of targeted therapies. I have served as the lead dermatologist in our ongoing effort to develop AI-augmented classification of skin lesions. We are in the process of establishing one of the first prospective studies examining the performance of a deep learning algorithm in real-world patients.

  • Michael G. Ozawa

    Michael G. Ozawa

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    Bio Dr. Ozawa is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology with subspecialty focus in Cytopathology, Head and Neck pathology, and Thoracic pathology. He completed his M.D., Ph.D. training at the McGovern Medical School and the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. He then completed residency training in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology followed by fellowship training in Surgical Pathology and Cytopathology at Stanford University. He is board certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology as well as Cytopathology. His interests include pulmonary neoplasms as well as neoplasms of the Head and Neck. He also has developed collaborative research interests in utilizing fine needle aspiration (FNA) techniques in the growing clinical application of Chimeric Antigen T Cell (CAR-T) therapy.

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