School of Medicine


Showing 21-39 of 39 Results

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Luby?s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries. He works primarily in Bangladesh.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr David M. Maahs is Professor of Pediatrics and Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico?s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado?s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs? leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as a Steering Committee member and Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as Secretary-General for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2016-20) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He currently serves on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ?Pink Panther,? which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, and prevent diabetic complications. He is author or co-author of over 250 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their children, Nicholas (20) and Natalia (15).

  • Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests: (i) genetic and environmental determinants of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, (ii) transdisciplinary strategies for improving population health.

  • Michelle Odden

    Michelle Odden

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio Michelle Odden, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Health Research and Policy. Her research aims to improve our understanding of the optimal preventive strategies for chronic disease in older adults, particularly those who have been underrepresented in research including the very old, frail, and racial/ethnic minorities. Her work has focused on prevention of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes, as well as preservation of physical and cognitive function in older adults. She is also strongly interested in epidemiological and statistical methods to reduce biases in observational studies. Dr. Odden came to Stanford from Oregon State University, where she helped build the new College of Public Health and Human Sciences. She completed her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley (2009), a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco in Primary Care Research (2011).

  • Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Palaniappan has completed over 80 studies spanning 20 years in diverse and understudied populations, chronic disease, and prevention. She has expertise in epidemiological research using large databases, use of electronic health records for research, and clinical trials.

  • Lesley Park

    Lesley Park

    Instructor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences (PHS)
    Associate Director, Education (2019-present)
    Director, PHS Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-present)
    Associate Director, Research and Data Strategy (2016-2019)

    Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
    Cancer Core Co-Director

    Dr. Lesley Park is one of the leaders of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences and the VACS Cancer Core. PHS aims to provide a central hub where researchers can efficiently access, link, visualize, and analyze data from a wide variety of sources to ultimately facilitate transdisciplinary population health science research. Within the VACS, Dr. Park oversees cancer outcomes research in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Her research experience has focused on the intersection of cancer and HIV, examining epidemiologic methods for cancer research, cancer incidence trends, and cancer (particularly hepatocellular carcinoma) prevention in PLWHA. Dr. Park is an experienced epidemiologist, skilled in observational research, survival analysis, and SAS programming. Her prior experience includes research at the Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research (CBAR) at the Harvard School of Public Health and at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Rita Popat

    Rita Popat

    Clinical Associate Professor, Health Research & Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest focuses on the epidemiology of Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, specifically evaluating the genetic and environmental contributions to these neurodegenerative disorders. I am also interested in studying the relation of cognition, estradiol exposure (endogenous and exogenous), and genetic factors.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Bio Lisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas? research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Science writing, science communication, biostatistics. Research areas: osteoporosis, stress fractures, sports injuries, female athlete triad.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy in the Epidemiology Division, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard? studies outcomes in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, but has shifted much of her focus to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. She is also interested in disentangling social and biological constructs in the reported disparities in SLE with respect to sex, gender, race, and ethnicity, both from the etiologic and outcomes perspectives.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanicks research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Womens Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Womens Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanfords Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Womens Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanfords Cardiovascular Institutes Womens Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Holly Tabor

    Holly Tabor

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on ethical issues in genetics and genomics, specifically return of results and translation for exome and whole genome sequencing and translation of genomic sequencing into the clinical setting. I also conduct research on ethical issues in clinical care and research for patients and families with autism and other developmental and cognitive disabilities.

  • Dee W. West

    Dee W. West

    Professor of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Cancer etiology (diet, familial, genetic), especially breast, prostate and colon cancer
    - Cancer surveillance (Cancer registration, cancer patterns)
    - Cancer outcomes (Survival, quality of life, quality of care)

  • Alice S Whittemore

    Alice S Whittemore

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Biomedical Data Science, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cancers of the prostate, breast and ovary account for a major proportion of new cancer cases and cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. Our recent research focus has been on developing improved statistical methods for the design and conduct of studies involving hereditary predisposition and modifiable lifestyle characteristics in the etiologies of site-specific cancers.

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