School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 109 Results

  • Fahim Abbasi

    Fahim Abbasi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Fahim Abbasi specializes in diagnosis and treatment of prediabetes and insulin resistance. Dr. Abbasi has a special interest in prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease through lifestyle modifications.

  • OscarJ. Abilez

    OscarJ. Abilez

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Bioengineering, biophysical control of cardiovascular development, pluripotent stem cell biology, optogenetics, electrophysiology, cell mechanics, directed cellular evolution, multiscale engineering, microfluidics, computational biology

  • Kevin Michael Alexander

    Kevin Michael Alexander

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Alexander is an advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist at Stanford. He is also a member of the Stanford Amyloid Center and Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. He completed his internal medicine residency training at Johns Hopkins Hospital and cardiology fellowship at Brigham and Women?s Hospital/Harvard Medical School. He then finished his training in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology at Stanford Hospital.

    He cares for patients in the clinic and in the hospital with advanced heart failure or those who underwent heart transplantation or mechanical circulatory support. His primary clinical and research interests lie in cardiac amyloidosis, in particular unraveling the molecular determinants of transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  • Myriam Amsallem, MD PhD

    Myriam Amsallem, MD PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Myriam Amsallem MD PhD is a cardiologist specialized in cardiac imaging. Co-director of the RV analytics group at Stanford, she has an interest in heart failure, cardioimmunology and early detection of pulmonary hypertension using imaging and circulating biomarkers. She is currently working on developping novel noninvasive strategies to detect pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, including deep learning analysis of Doppler signals and 4D flow MRI. She also has a special interest in educational projects to improve the quality of imaging methodology.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • Nitish Badhwar

    Nitish Badhwar

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Nitish Badhwar, MD is Professor of Medicine and Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology Training Program at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Badhwar received his medical degree from Maulana Azad Medical College (University of Delhi, India). After completing his internal medicine training from New York Hospital of Queens (affiliated with Cornell Medical School), he worked as faculty in the Department of Medicine at Hospital of St. Raphael (Yale University School of Medicine). He completed Cardiac Electrophysiology training at UCSF with Dr. Scheinman. After being on faculty at UCSF for 15 years he recently joined the Arrhythmia Service at Stanford Hospital. He is a Fellow of American College of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society. He has been named best doctor in cardiac electrophysiology in San Francisco Magazine 3 years in a row (2015-2017). This is nominated by his peers. He was given Excellence in Teaching award in Medical Education by Academy of Medical Educators in 2015. He was an invited speaker at prestigious international meetings including Oriental Congress of Cardiology (OCC) in Shanghai, China; Cardiostim EHRA /Europace in Nice, France; Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) in Seoul, S Korea; American Heart Association Annual Scientific Session in New Orleans, LA and Indian Heart Rhythm Society in New Delhi, India.


    Clinical Interest: Dr. Badhwar's clinical interest is in complex catheter ablation procedures including mapping and ventricular tachycardia (VT), atrial fibrillation (AF) and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) including junctional variants of SVT. He started the epicardial ablation program at UCSF and also worked with Dr. Randall Lee to perform the first percutaneous epicardial left atrial appendage (LAA) ligation in the Bay Area in patients with atrial fibrillation. He has also differentiated himself in the field of electrophysiology by performing hybrid procedures with CT surgeons in patients with AF and VT. He is also involved in device implantation including pacemakers, ICD and biventricular pacing for heart failure.

    Research Interest: Dr. Badhwar has published electrophysiologic characteristics of SVTs including atrial tachycardia arising from the coronary sinus musculature, para-hisian atrial tachycardia, left sided AVNRT, junctional tachycardia and nodofascicular tachycardia. He has also published on the use of nuclear medicine (ERNA) in assessing left ventricular dyssynchrony as well as optimal pacing sties in patients with heart failure requiring biventricular pacing. He has described the unique clinical characteristics of epicardial idiopathic VT arising from the cardiac crux. He has also published clinical outcomes of combining LAA ligation with catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation perform (first in human percutaneous closed chested Maze procedure) and is now part of a multi-center randomized study comparing standard ablation to ablation plus LAA ligation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (aMAZE trial).

  • Tina Baykaner

    Tina Baykaner

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Tina Baykaner is an Instructor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Electrophysiology. Following internal medicine residency, cardiovascular medicine and advanced heart failure fellowship trainings at University of California, San Diego and electrophysiology fellowship at Stanford University, Dr. Baykaner joined Stanford University faculty in 2018. She has published over 200 papers, book chapters and abstracts including over 50 original peer-reviewed articles, and delivered over 20 invited presentations in national and international meetings. She serves as section editor and editorial board member of four electrophysiology journals.

    Dr. Baykaner?s current research interests include outcomes research, epidemiology and mechanisms of rhythm disorders. She is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health to study patient related outcomes regarding atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. She received prior research funding from American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society. Dr. Baykaner's clinical practice focuses on ablation of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, SVTs, inapproriate sinus tachycardia management, device implantation and device extraction.

    Dr. Baykaner is an active member of American Heart Association (AHA), American College of Cardiology (ACC), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC). She serves as an elected member of the Communications Committee for HRS, and previously served as an elected member of the ACC Task Force ICD research committee. She also served in the Organizing Committee for Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Annual Postdoctoral Research Meeting in 2017 and 2018 and for Early Career related sessions for HRS Scientific Sessions in 2019 and 2020.

  • Chia Yu Alex Chang

    Chia Yu Alex Chang

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-chromosome-linked genetic disease that is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene and affects 1 in every 3500 boys. DMD patients suffer progressive muscle wasting and eventual cardiorespiratory failure that results in an early death in the second or third decade of life. Although extensive research effort has been invested, lack of a good mouse model that mimics the cardiac failure hinders research. We have developed a novel mouse model that exhibit all the symptoms found in DMD patients and our research is aimed at understanding the cardiac failure in DMD for future therapeutic interventions. Our mouse model fully recapitulates the DMD symptoms because we also took into account of the size of human protection DNA on chromosomal ends (telomere) compared to mouse. We would like to study the cause of cardiac failure in our mouse model by 1) determine if telomere shortening is specific to cardiomyocytes, 2) evaluate the level of cellular damage caused by oxidative stress and 3) identify the source of oxidative stress. These experiments will help us to better understand cardiac failure in DMD patients and allow testing of therapeutic interventions.

  • Stephen Chang

    Stephen Chang

    Clinical Scholar, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Prior to a career in medicine, Dr. Chang was an English major and subsequent novelist at night. During the days, he taught literature part-time at Rutgers University, and for extra money, worked in a laboratory in NYC washing test tubes. Inspired by his laboratory mentor, he began volunteering at the hospital next door, and developed a love for interacting with patients. Through this experience, he saw how caring for others could form deep bonds between people - even strangers - and connect us in a way that brings grandeur to ordinary life.

    In addition to seeing patients, Dr. Chang is a physician-scientist devoted to advancing the field of cardiovascular medicine. His research has been focused on identifying a new genetic organism that better models human heart disease than the mouse. For this purpose, he has been studying the mouse lemur, the smallest non-human primate, performing cardiovascular phenotyping (vital signs, ECG, echocardiogram) on lemurs both in-bred (in France) and in the wild (in Madagascar) to try to identify mutant cardiac traits that may be heritable - and in the process, characterize the first high-throughput primate model of human cardiac disease.

  • William Clusin, MD

    William Clusin, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiac action potentials; tissue culture, voltage, clamp technique; role of calcium in ischemia arrhythmias; coronary, artery disease; myocardial infarction.

  • Ronnie Thomas Collins

    Ronnie Thomas Collins

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research endeavors are focused on populations with connective tissue disorders that manifest as cardiovascular abnormalities, such as Williams, Marfan, and Loeys-Dietz syndromes. Additionally, as a member of the California Center of BD-Steps II, I study birth defects associated with congenital heart disease.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

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