School of Medicine


Showing 1-33 of 33 Results

  • Matthew Baker

    Matthew Baker

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Dr. Baker is the Clinical Chief in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. He received his bachelor's degree from Pomona College, his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, and his master's degree in Epidemiology and Clinical Research from Stanford University. He completed his Internal Medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and his Rheumatology fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Baker has established a clinical research program that is focused on clinical trials and bench-to-bedside translational research. He has designed and led investigator-initiated studies with a focus on sarcoidosis, Sjogren?s syndrome, and IgG4-related disease. In addition, he is a founder and Co-Director of the Stanford Multidisciplinary Sarcoidosis Program and collaborates with other team members to advance sarcoidosis clinical care and research.

  • Yashaar Chaichian

    Yashaar Chaichian

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Systemic lupus erythematosus
    CTD-associated interstitial lung disease

  • Alvina Dor-Yan Chu

    Alvina Dor-Yan Chu

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Alvina Chu, MD, is an adjunct clinical faculty member within the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology. She has practiced rheumatology for more than 10 years, specializing in treatment of a wide range of chronic inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, vasculitis, and gout.

    She holds a longstanding scientific interest in immunology, especially the role of B-cell signaling mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

    In addition to taking care of patients in clinic and in the hospital, Dr. Chu enjoys teaching and mentoring fellows, residents, and medical students.

  • Lorinda Chung

    Lorinda Chung

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Dermatology at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on all aspects of systemic sclerosis. I am currently involved in clinical, translational, and epidemiologic research in these areas, and dedicate a substantial portion of my research time to investigator-initiated and multi-center clinical trials of novel therapeutics for the treatment of systemic sclerosis.

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disease.

  • Robert Michael Fairchild

    Robert Michael Fairchild

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fairchild?s research interests center on novel applications of ultrasonography in rheumatologic disease. Current active research endeavors include using ultrasound 1) to evaluate articular and soft tissue manifestations of systemic sclerosis, 2) to screen, detect and monitor of connective tissue disease associated interstitial lung disease, 3) and to examine the incidence of immune checkpoint inhibitor related adverse events and inflammatory arthritis.

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control regulatory T cell (Treg) responsiveness by inhibiting the Treg IL-2 receptor desensitization. We have characterized a gene (Deaf1) that plays a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D. Using PBC gene expression, we have provisionally identified a signature of risk and progression in T1D.

  • Mark Genovese

    Mark Genovese

    James W. Raitt M.D. Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical trials and interventions in the rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis,Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic Sclerosis, Osteoarthritis.

  • Jorg Goronzy

    Jorg Goronzy

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests T cell homeostasis and function with age

  • Halsted Holman

    Halsted Holman

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Organization of community health care programs; management of chronic disease; introduction and evaluation of patient education and self-care practices; evaluation of health care outcomes and health system performance.

  • Jison Hong

    Jison Hong

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Dr. Hong specializes in the diagnosis, evalaution and management of all rheumatologic diseases. She has a special interest in rheumatologic disease manifestations in patients with cancer and receiving cancer treatments. She collaborates with researchers to recruit patients for clinical trials and works with a research coordinator to collect blood and patient demographic information to study the effects of rheumatoid arthritis on cardiovascular disease. She has received additional training in the use of musculoskeletal ultrasound to evaluate and treat patients who may benefit from diagnostic ultrasound or ultrasound guided interventions.

  • Tamiko Katsumoto

    Tamiko Katsumoto

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Tamiko Katsumoto, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. She earned her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at UCSF, including a postdoc in the immunology lab of Dr. Arthur Weiss. Dr. Katsumoto?s research interests include the discovery of novel biomarkers to predict the development of immune-related adverse events in cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies, and optimizing the management of such complications. She is fascinated by the relationship between cancer and autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and dermatomyositis, the paraneoplastic manifestations of various cancers, and the rheumatic complications of graft vs. host disease. She has spent time at Genentech, where she led several clinical trials in immunology. She also serves as a grant reviewer for the American College of Rheumatology Translational/Clinical Study Section and serves on the Medical and Scientific Board of the Northern California Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation.

  • Amy Ladd, MD

    Amy Ladd, MD

    Elsbach-Richards Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Interests
    1. The kinematics and forces associated with thumb carpometcarpal (CMC) function and pathology
    2. The anatomy, microstructure, and immunofluorescent characteristics of the thumb CMC joint
    3. Pathomechaniics of CMC arthritis: biomechanical wear, injury, genetic, and environmental causes
    4. Archiving, vitalizing, and innovating medical and surgical knowledge, most recently with innovative iBook monographs

  • Janice Lin

    Janice Lin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio Dr. Lin specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, myositis, gout, and seronegative spondyloarthropathies. She received additional training in autoimmune skin diseases and has a special clinical and research interest for psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis, dermatomyositis, cutaneous lupus/systemic lupus. She leads a combined rheumatology-dermatology clinic with Dr. Matthew Lewis in the dermatology department to take care patients collaboratively. Dr. Lin is a graduate of USSONAR (Ultrasound School of North American Rheumatologists) program and performs diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound evaluation and interventions. In addition to her clinical work, she leads the quality improvement effort for the division and her most recent projects are focused on patient-reported outcome in rheumatoid arthritis and vaccinations for patients in the rheumatology clinic.

  • Kate Lorig

    Kate Lorig

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Community based psycoeducational intervention studies of disease self management for people with chronic diseases. arthritis, lung diseases, heart disease AIDs, low back pain and diabetes. Programs and studies in Spanish and English. Interventions are in small groups, mailed or on the Internet.

  • Bill Robinson

    Bill Robinson

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab studies the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:

    1. To investigate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases.

    2. To develop diagnostics and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

    3. To investigate the role of inflammation in osteoarthritis.

  • Neha Shah

    Neha Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio My clinical and research interests lie in Integrative Rheumatology, healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole patient, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies, including those outside the realm of allopathic medicine. Specifically, I am interested in exploring the impact of diet/nutrition/botanicals on inflammation as it pertains to rheumatic diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriatic arthritis and other autoimmune conditions, as well as studying the impact of other lifestyle approaches such as mindful meditation, sleep, yoga, stress reduction, etc. on disease burden and quality of life of patients with rheumatic diseases.

  • Stanford Shoor

    Stanford Shoor

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Patient Centered Care in Rheumatic Disease
    Sarcoidosis

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, but her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This fueled a number of collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was recently awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as SLE. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epi focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities.

  • Samuel Strober

    Samuel Strober

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms of immune tolerance; regulatory processes in autoimmunity and transplantation and extrathymic T cell maturation.

  • PJ Utz

    PJ Utz

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term research goal of Utz laboratory is (1) to develop a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases by exploring signaling pathways that are activated during apoptosis; and (2) to better understand the complicated process of programmed cell death.

  • Cornelia Weyand

    Cornelia Weyand

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Telomere biology and genomic stress in autoimmunity and inflammation

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: