School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 109 Results

  • Fahim Abbasi

    Fahim Abbasi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Fahim Abbasi specializes in diagnosis and treatment of prediabetes and insulin resistance. Dr. Abbasi has a special interest in prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease through lifestyle modifications.

  • Oscar J. Abilez

    Oscar J. Abilez

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Abilez' interests are aimed at elucidating how various biophysical and biochemical perturbations regulate early cardiovascular development across time and length scales that span several orders of magnitude, using human pluripotent stem cells as a model system.

  • Kevin M. Alexander, MD, FACC

    Kevin M. Alexander, MD, FACC

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Alexander is an advanced heart failure-trained cardiologist. He is also an Assistant Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Alexander specializes in the management of advanced heart failure and transplant cases, seeing a wide range of patients. He also has an active research laboratory, studying various forms of heart failure.

    Dr. Alexander has expertise in diagnosing and treating transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis, a critical yet underdiagnosed cause of heart failure among African Americans and the elderly. He is conducting extensive research to enhance our understanding of this condition, with grant support from the National Institutes of Health and American Heart Association, among other sources.

  • Myriam Amsallem, MD PhD

    Myriam Amsallem, MD PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Myriam Amsallem MD PhD is a cardiologist specialized in cardiac imaging. Co-director of the RV analytics group at Stanford and Associate Director of the Clinical Biomarker and Phenotype Core Laboratory (Stanford Cardiovascular Institute), she has an interest in heart failure, cardio immunology and early detection of pulmonary hypertension using imaging, circulating biomarkers and digital health. She is currently working on developing novel noninvasive strategies to detect pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, including deep learning analysis of Doppler signals and 4D flow MRI. She also leads several educational projects to improve the quality of imaging methodology.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • Nitish Badhwar

    Nitish Badhwar

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Nitish Badhwar, MD is Professor of Medicine and Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology Training Program at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Badhwar received his medical degree from Maulana Azad Medical College (University of Delhi, India). After completing his internal medicine training from New York Hospital of Queens (affiliated with Cornell Medical School), he worked as faculty in the Department of Medicine at Hospital of St. Raphael (Yale University School of Medicine). He completed Cardiac Electrophysiology training at UCSF with Dr. Scheinman. After being on faculty at UCSF for 15 years he recently joined the Arrhythmia Service at Stanford Hospital. He is a Fellow of American College of Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Society. He has been named best doctor in cardiac electrophysiology in San Francisco Magazine 3 years in a row (2015-2017). This is nominated by his peers. He was given Excellence in Teaching award in Medical Education by Academy of Medical Educators in 2015. He was an invited speaker at prestigious international meetings including Oriental Congress of Cardiology (OCC) in Shanghai, China; Cardiostim EHRA /Europace in Nice, France; Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) in Seoul, S Korea; American Heart Association Annual Scientific Session in New Orleans, LA and Indian Heart Rhythm Society in New Delhi, India.


    Clinical Interest: Dr. Badhwar's clinical interest is in complex catheter ablation procedures including mapping and ventricular tachycardia (VT), atrial fibrillation (AF) and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) including junctional variants of SVT. He started the epicardial ablation program at UCSF and also worked with Dr. Randall Lee to perform the first percutaneous epicardial left atrial appendage (LAA) ligation in the Bay Area in patients with atrial fibrillation. He has also differentiated himself in the field of electrophysiology by performing hybrid procedures with CT surgeons in patients with AF and VT. He is also involved in device implantation including pacemakers, ICD and biventricular pacing for heart failure.

    Research Interest: Dr. Badhwar has published electrophysiologic characteristics of SVTs including atrial tachycardia arising from the coronary sinus musculature, para-hisian atrial tachycardia, left sided AVNRT, junctional tachycardia and nodofascicular tachycardia. He has also published on the use of nuclear medicine (ERNA) in assessing left ventricular dyssynchrony as well as optimal pacing sties in patients with heart failure requiring biventricular pacing. He has described the unique clinical characteristics of epicardial idiopathic VT arising from the cardiac crux. He has also published clinical outcomes of combining LAA ligation with catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation perform (first in human percutaneous closed chested Maze procedure) and is now part of a multi-center randomized study comparing standard ablation to ablation plus LAA ligation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (aMAZE trial).

  • Tina Baykaner

    Tina Baykaner

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Tina Baykaner is an Instructor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Electrophysiology. Following internal medicine residency, cardiovascular medicine and advanced heart failure fellowship trainings at University of California, San Diego and electrophysiology fellowship at Stanford University, Dr. Baykaner joined Stanford University faculty in 2018. She has published over 200 papers, book chapters and abstracts including over 50 original peer-reviewed articles, and delivered over 20 invited presentations in national and international meetings. She serves as section editor and editorial board member of four electrophysiology journals.

    Dr. Baykaner?s current research interests include outcomes research, epidemiology and mechanisms of rhythm disorders. She is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health to study patient related outcomes regarding atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. She received prior research funding from American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society. Dr. Baykaner's clinical practice focuses on ablation of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, SVTs, inapproriate sinus tachycardia management, device implantation and device extraction.

    Dr. Baykaner is an active member of American Heart Association (AHA), American College of Cardiology (ACC), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC). She serves as an elected member of the Communications Committee for HRS, and previously served as an elected member of the ACC Task Force ICD research committee. She also served in the Organizing Committee for Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Annual Postdoctoral Research Meeting in 2017 and 2018 and for Early Career related sessions for HRS Scientific Sessions in 2019 and 2020.

  • Stephen Chang, MD, PhD

    Stephen Chang, MD, PhD

    Clinical Scholar, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Prior to a career in medicine, Dr. Chang was an English major and subsequent novelist at night. During the days, he taught literature part-time at Rutgers University, and for extra money, worked in a laboratory in NYC washing test tubes. Inspired by his laboratory mentor, he began volunteering at the hospital next door, and developed a love for interacting with patients. Through this experience, he saw how caring for others could form deep bonds between people - even strangers - and connect us in a way that brings grandeur to ordinary life.

    In addition to seeing patients, Dr. Chang is a physician-scientist devoted to advancing the field of cardiovascular medicine. His research has been focused on identifying a new genetic organism that better models human heart disease than the mouse. For this purpose, he has been studying the mouse lemur, the smallest non-human primate, performing cardiovascular phenotyping (vital signs, ECG, echocardiogram) on lemurs both in-bred (in France) and in the wild (in Madagascar) to try to identify mutant cardiac traits that may be heritable - and in the process, characterize the first high-throughput primate model of human cardiac disease.

  • William Clusin, MD

    William Clusin, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiac action potentials; tissue culture, voltage, clamp technique; role of calcium in ischemia arrhythmias; coronary, artery disease; myocardial infarction.

  • Ronnie Thomas Collins

    Ronnie Thomas Collins

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research endeavors are focused on populations with connective tissue disorders that manifest as cardiovascular abnormalities, such as Williams, Marfan, and Loeys-Dietz syndromes. Additionally, as a member of the California Center of BD-Steps II, I study birth defects associated with congenital heart disease.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • Rajesh Dash, MD PhD;      Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Rajesh Dash, MD PhD; Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I have two research areas:
    1) Heart disease in South Asians - genetic, metabolic, & behavioral underpinnings of an aggressive phenotype.

    2) Imaging cell injury & recovery in the heart. Using Cardiac MRI to visualize signals of early injury and facilitating preventive medical therapy. Optimizing new imaging methods for viable cells to delineate live heart cells or transplanted stem cells.

  • Rajiv Narendra Doshi

    Rajiv Narendra Doshi

    Academic Staff - Hourly - CSL, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Health technology innovation

  • William Fearon, MD

    William Fearon, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Fearon's general research interest is coronary physiology. In particular, he is investigating invasive methods for evaluating the coronary microcirculation. His research is currently funded by an NIH R01 Award.

  • Michael B. Fowler, MB, FRCP

    Michael B. Fowler, MB, FRCP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adrenergic nervous system; beta-adrenergic function in, heart failure; drugs in heart failure.

  • Victor Froelicher, MD

    Victor Froelicher, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Screening of athletes for sudden cardiac death, Computerized ECG and clinical data management; exercise Physiology including expired gas analysis; the effect of chronic and acute exercise on the heart; digital recording of biological signals; diagnostic use of exercise testing; development of Expert Medical System software and educational tools.

  • Jeffrey M. Guardino

    Jeffrey M. Guardino

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Guardino grew up in New York City and after completing medical school in DC at Georgetown, moved to Boston where he completed his Internal Medicine training at Harvard. He then went on to fellowship training in Cardiology while in Boston and moved to the Bay Area with his wife and family in 2000. In his spare time he enjoys hiking, skiing and reading.

  • Francois Haddad

    Francois Haddad

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Francois Haddad, MD is a Clinical Professor of Medicine that specializes in the field of cardio-vascular imaging, pulmonary hypertension, advanced heart failure and transplantation. Dr. Haddad has over 18 years of practice in the field of cardiology. He directs Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Biomarker and Phenotypic Core Laboratory dedicated to translational studies in cardiovascular medicine. The laboratory focuses on (1) identifying early biomarkers of heart failure and aging, (2) bioengineering approaches to cardiovascular disease modeling and (3) novel informatic approach for the detection and risk stratification of disease. He is involved is several precision medicine initiatives in health including the Project Baseline, the Integrated Personalized Omics Profiling Initiative, the Athletic screening program at Stanford and the Strong-D cardiac rehabilitation initiative in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  • Christiane Haeffele

    Christiane Haeffele

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adult Congenital Heart Disease

  • William Haskell

    William Haskell

    Professor (Research) of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My major research interests and activities over the next several years will focus on the development and evaluation of the objective measurement of physical activity in free-living populations using a variety of sensing devices and mobile phones for data collection and processing. Also, I will continue to direct the Stanford Heart Network with the major mission being to assist community-based CVD prevention/treatment programs implement more effective heart attack and stroke prevention programs.

  • Paul Heidenreich, MD

    Paul Heidenreich, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include

    1) The cost-effectiveness of new cardiovascular technologies.
    Example: tests to screen asymptomatic patients for left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    2) Interventions to improve the quality of care of patients with heart disease. Examples: include clinical reminders and home monitoring.

    3) Outcomes research using existing clinical and administrative datasets.

    4) Use of echocardiography to predict prognosis (e.g. diastolic dysfunction).

  • Mark Hlatky, MD

    Mark Hlatky, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Health Services Research), of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research work is in "outcomes research", especially examining the field of cardiovascular medicine. Particular areas of interest are the integration of economic and quality of life data into randomized clinical trials, evidence-based medicine, decision models, and cost-effectiveness analysis. I am also interested in the application of novel genetic, biomarker, and imaging tests to assess risk and guide clinical management of coronary artery disease.

  • Valerie Hoover

    Valerie Hoover

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Hoover's research interests include translating behavioral weight management interventions to the Cardiology setting, and developing novel interventions to improve biopsychosocial outcomes in Cardiology.

  • Erik Ingelsson

    Erik Ingelsson

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the link between metabolic disturbances, such as obesity and insulin resistance, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Our research is translational and interdisciplinary, combining population-based studies with molecular biology to reach new insights into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and related conditions, identification of new biomarkers for improved risk prediction, and discovery of novel drug targets.

  • Kiranbir Josan

    Kiranbir Josan

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular Disease
    Primary Prevention
    Secondary Prevention
    Cardiovascular Disease in South Asian Populations

  • Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Michael S. Kapiloff is a faculty member in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Although Dr. Kapiloff was at one time a Board-Certified General Pediatrician, he is currently involved in full-time basic science and translational research. His laboratory studies the basic molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the retinal ganglion cell and cardiac myocyte to disease. The longstanding interest of his laboratory is the role in intracellular signal transduction of multimolecular complexes organized by scaffold proteins. Recently, his lab has also been involved in the translation of these concepts into new therapies, including the development of new AAV gene therapy biologics for the prevention and treatment of heart failure and for neuroprotection in the eye.

    URL to NCBI listing of all published works:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/michael.kapiloff.1/bibliography/40252285/public/?sort=date&direction=descending

    For more information see Dr. Kapiloff's lab website: http://med.stanford.edu/kapilofflab.html

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Kawana joined Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018 as an Instructor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in clinic, and attends on inpatient service taking care of post-heart transplant patients and patients on MCS support. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approach, which would lead to development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein.

  • Abha Khandelwal

    Abha Khandelwal

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular disease in Pregnancy
    Valvular Heart Disease
    Cardiomyopathy
    Pericardial disease
    Heart Disease in South Asians
    Women's Cardiovascular Disease

  • Kiran Kaur Khush, MD

    Kiran Kaur Khush, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Khush'’s clinical research interests include the evaluation of donors and recipients for heart transplantation; mechanisms of adverse outcomes after heart transplantation, including cardiac allograft vasculopathy and antibody-mediated rejection; and development of non-invasive diagnostic approaches for post-transplant monitoring.

  • Gloria Kim

    Gloria Kim

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Medical education
    Health services delivery
    Management of chronic disease
    Patient and physician satisfaction

  • Joshua W. Knowles

    Joshua W. Knowles

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic basis of coronary disease
    Genetic basis of insulin resistance
    Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH)

  • David Lee, MD

    David Lee, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Novel treatments and devices for the treatment of valvular disease
    2. Alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
    3. Novel approaches to coronary revascularization
    4. Closure devices for atrial septal defects and patent foramen ovale
    5. Novel treatments for hypertension

  • Eleanor Levin

    Eleanor Levin

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Eleanor Levin completed her undergraduate degree at Stanford, Phi Beta Kappa in Human Biology with Distinction, and her MD at UCSF as a Phi Beta Kappa Scholar. Her first internship was at Children's Hospital of San Francisco in pediatrics and her second at the Cleveland Clinic in internal medicine. She completed internal medicine training at Georgetown University and cardiology fellowship at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. At GW she undertook an advanced fellowship in echocardiography and lipids following her general cardiology fellowship. After fellowship training, Dr. Levin joined the GW faculty as an assistant professor of medicine in the Lipid Research Clinic. Subsequently she joined The Permanente Medical Group in northern California as a non-invasive cardiologist. She directed the Echocardiography Lab at Kaiser Santa Clara and introduced TEE and stress echo during her 25-year tenure. She introduced CT angiography of the heart at Santa Clara and coordinated joint readings between Radiology and Cardiology for 15 years. She created the Cholesterol Management and Heart Failure Programs initially at Santa Clara and eventually at more than 20 medical centers in Northern California. She was Kaiser's regional expert in lipidology as well as in cardiac disease in pregnancy in a patient population of 4 million. Dr. Levin served as Chief of Cardiology at Santa Clara for 16 years and as Chair of the Chiefs of Cardiology (120 cardiologists) for Northern California Kaiser for 8 years. She directed the Regional Cardiac Rehabilitation Program using home-based comprehensive rehabilitation across 18 medical centers for nearly three decades. During this time, she led teams developing cardiac guidelines embedded in order sets and electronic medical records throughout Kaiser medical centers to improve quality. She has spoken about and presented her work on population management and quality improvement nationally and internationally. Her awards include the national NCQA (National Committee of Quality Assurance) Award for Excellence in Cardiac Care, the Exceptional Contribution Award from The Permanente Medical Group for ?exceptional work in care management programs? for heart failure and cholesterol management, the Santa Clara County Medical Association Outstanding Achievement Award for cardiac care management, and the Silicon Business Journal Award as one of the "Top 100 Influential Women in Silicon Valley." She is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and in Cardiovascular Diseases by the American Board of Internal Medicine.
    Dr. Levin is a member of the Preventive Cardiology group. She participates in the Women?s Heart Health group and consults on pregnant patients with heart disease as requested. She sees general cardiology patients with lipid disorders and cardiovascular diseases of all types.

  • Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Lewis is a board-certified, fellowship-trained specialist in cardiovascular medicine. He is the chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and a professor of cardiovascular medicine.

    Dr. Lewis is an esteemed clinician-scientist who specializes in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He is an internationally recognized expert on heart failure, heart transplant, and quality of life for heart failure patients. He cares deeply about his patients as well as his colleagues, the hospital, and the School of Medicine. Dr. Lewis is committed to diversity and inclusion, as well as expanding Stanford clinical research initiatives.

    A fundamental principle of Dr. Lewis? practice is his belief that ?there is more to life than death,? that cardiovascular care should go beyond helping patients survive to also helping them enjoy the best possible quality of life.

    Dr. Lewis has deep expertise in conducting clinical trials examining diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to heart failure. He has done innovative work to create systems for incorporating quality of life measures for cardiovascular patients into electronic health records. This research has received support from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institutes of Health.

    Much of his quality of life research has focused on patient-reported outcomes. Dr. Lewis emphasizes the importance of looking at how a disease, whether chronic or acute, impacts people?s ability to function and perform their activities of daily living. Strategies to improve patients? well-being focus not only on their physical symptoms but also on depression, anxiety, exercise capacity, and ability to function in daily living.

    Dr. Lewis? commitment to expanding clinical research initiatives will give patients more opportunities to participate in the clinical trials and access the latest care strategies that can translate into better outcomes. The goal is early access to the most advanced technology, pharmacology, and device therapy that can change outcomes for the better. He also envisions forming closer partnerships with community cardiologists and capitalizing further on Stanford?s proximity to and unique relationships with the digital technology leaders of Silicon Valley to enhance the use of digital technology for monitoring patients, optimizing treatment, and tracking outcomes.

    He has authored nearly 200 articles published in peer-reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation, JAMA Cardiology, JAMA Internal Medicine, and many more. He is also on multiple editorial boards for cardiovascular journals and was an associate editor for Circulation?Heart Failure. In addition, he is an author of professional society clinical practice guidelines and scientific statements from both the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Food and Drug Administration.

    Dr. Lewis? honors for clinical care, scholarship, and research include the Joel Gordon Miller Award for community service and leadership from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He also was one of the first recipients of the Minority Faculty Development Award, which recognizes the research potential of young physicians. Dr. Lewis has received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the role of quality of life assessment in clinical decision making in patients with heart failure.

    He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the National American Heart Association (AHA) Research Committee. In addition, Dr. Lewis was as a member of the AHA Founders Affiliate Board of Directors, chair of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, and research chair of the Association of Black Cardiologists. He also serves on scientific committees to review grants for the AHA and on the FDA Task Force for the Standardization of Definitions for Endpoint Events in Cardiovascular Trials.

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Bio Stanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Ronglih Liao

    Ronglih Liao

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Bio Dr. Liao is a Professor of Medicine and co-Director of Stanford Cardiac Amyloid Center. The major goal of her research program focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of heart failure and developing novel treatments to combat this process. Her laboratory has played an international leading role in the study of amyloid light chain (AL) cardiomyopathy, a rare and fatal form of cardiovascular disease. We have described the underlying pathophysiologic basis for amyloid cardiomyopathy and found that the circulating amyloidogenic light chain proteins that characterize this disease directly result in a specific cardiotoxic response. Consequently, our research work has redefined AL cardiomyopathy and has raised new treatment approaches. More recently, her research efforts have expanded to include transthyretin (ATTR) cardiac amyloidosis.

    In line with her goal of revealing novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiovascular disease, our efforts have also focused on characterizing and harnessing endogenous cardiac regenerative mechanisms. Her laboratory initially demonstrated the therapeutic potential of exogenous primitive muscle cells delivered to the injured heart. This work was among the earliest milestones in the field and served as the basis for an international trial of cell-based therapy. Subsequently, Liao lab identified and characterized a population of cardiac progenitor cells and its relationship and dynamic activity following cardiac injury in the adult heart. Her laboratory aims to reveal the molecular mechanisms regulating the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart and to harness such repair mechanisms for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Dr. Liao has lectured extensively on both amyloid cardiomyopathy and stem cell biology, and have maintained a history of independent NIH funding in these areas for more than two decades.

    Over the course of her academic career, she has taken the greatest pride in mentoring the next generation of scientists. Dr. Liao has had the privilege to supervise several dozen students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, many of whom have gone on to independent academic careers at the highest institutions. Her contribution to the advancement of scientific knowledge also includes lecturing at various university and academic institutions as well as at scores of conferences and symposia locally, nationally, and internationally.

  • Norman Lowenbraun

    Norman Lowenbraun

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr Lowenbraun has been a practicing cardiologist in the Bay Area for over 25 years, having moved here after receiving his medical and specialty training on the East Coast. He believes offering the personal care of a community setting and empowering the patient in their healthcare decisions, combined with the resources of Stanford Hospital , offers his patients the best of both worlds.

  • George Lui

    George Lui

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Adult Congenital Heart Disease

  • Kenneth Mahaffey

    Kenneth Mahaffey

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Clinical Focus: Cardiovascular Medicine

    Research Focus:

    My primary research interest is the design and conduct of multicenter clinical trials and analyses of important clinical cardiac issues using large patient databases. My research focuses on novel anticoagulation agents for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and atrial fibrillation, the study of agents targeted to protect the myocardium during reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction, and the evaluation of cardiovascular safety of diabetic therapies. I am also interested in the methodology of clinical trials. Current research activities include standardization of the definition of myocardial infarction used in clinical trials, the adjudication of suspected clinical endpoint events by Clinical Event Committees (CEC), and the efficient operational conduct of large multinational clinical trials.

    Administrative Focus: Vice Chair of Clinical Research in the Department of Medicine and Member of the Stanford IRB

    Professional Training:

    1985 Stanford University, BS Chemistry
    1989 University of Washington, MD
    1993 University of Arizona, Internship/Residency/Chief Residency
    1996 Duke University, Fellowship in Cardiology
    1996 Duke University, Faculty in Cardiology
    2013 Stanford University, Vice Chair of Clinical Research, Department of Medicine

  • Anurag Mairal

    Anurag Mairal

    Academic Staff - Hourly - CSL, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Anurag Mairal is an Adjunct Professor of Medicine and the Director, Global Outreach Programs at Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, Stanford University. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Stanford's Graduate School of Business and a Faculty Fellow and Lead for Technology Innovation and Impact at Center for Innovation in Global Health. In these roles, he leads initiatives focused on applying the biodesign process to resource-constrained settings globally. Further, he facilitates opportunities for students, faculty and fellows at Stanford to work on global healthcare needs. He is part of the founding faculty team for MED 232, Global Health: Scaling Health Technology Innovations in Low Resource Settings and BIOE 371, Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context, graduate-level courses offered to engineering, business, and medical students at Stanford University. Earlier, he served as Associate Director for the Stanford-India Biodesign and Singapore-Stanford Biodesign programs. He serves as the Founding Chair of BME IDEA APAC, a community of medtech innovation programs in Asia Pacific, partnering closely with the industry and academia in the region. He is also an Honorary Professor at University of Cape Town, South Africa. Concurrently, he is a co-founder and Executive Vice President of Orbees Medical, a SF Bay Area-based strategy consulting firm serving global healthcare industry, with a focus on medtech, pharmaceutical, and digital health industry. 

    Dr. Mairal has an extensive background in medical technology development and commercialization, collaborating with partners in the U.S., India, China, and other emerging markets to advance product development, manufacturing, and distribution. Recently, he took a sabbatical for two years to take a senior leadership role at PATH, a major global health nonprofit based in Seattle. In this role, he oversaw research and development, commercialization, and implementation of technologies in PATH?s medical devices, diagnostics, and digital health divisions. Previously, he held several positions at Johnson & Johnson, including Business Development Director and Product Director for structural heart, cardiology, and peripheral vascular products at Cordis. Before joining J&J, he was a Group Leader and a Process Development Manager at Membrane Technology and Research (MTR). At MTR, he was responsible for business development, strategic alliances, and product development in the bioseparations area. An active mentor to entrepreneurs and industry professionals, he serves as the chair of PATH?s Bay Area Leadership Council, board member at EPPIC Global Network and IIT Bombay Heritage Foundation and advisory board member at D-Rev and Sewa International.

    Dr. Mairal earned a PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder and an MBA from the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. He also holds an MS in chemical engineering from the Indian Institution of Technology in Mumbai and a BS in chemical engineering from National Institute of Technology, Raipur. Dr. Mairal was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Twente, Netherlands and at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At BerkeleyHaas, he was a founding co-Chairman of the South Asia Business Conference and Chair of the Biotech Panel for the Asia Business Conference. His work has been published in more than 30 publications, and he has seven issued patents.

  • Joshua Makower

    Joshua Makower

    Academic Staff - Hourly - CSL, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Josh Makower serves on the faculty of the Stanford University Medical School as an Adjunct Professor of Medicine and is Co-Founder of Stanford?s Biodesign Innovation Program (now called the Byers Center for Biodesign). Josh helped create the fundamental structure of the Center?s core curriculum and is the chief architect of what is now called ?The Biodesign Process.? Over the past 18 years since Josh and Dr. Paul Yock founded the Stanford Biodesign Innovation Program, this curriculum and the associated textbook has been used at Stanford and across the world to train thousands of students, faculty and industry leaders on the biodesign process towards the advancement of medical innovation for the improvement of patient care. Josh has practiced these same techniques directly as the Founder & Executive Chairman of ExploraMed, a medical device incubator, creating 8 companies since 1995. Transactions from the ExploraMed portfolio include NeoTract, acquired by Teleflex, Acclarent, acquired by J&J, EndoMatrix, acquired by C.R. Bard & TransVascular, acquired by Medtronic. Other ExploraMed/NEA ventures include Moximed, Nuelle and Willow. Josh is currently also working with NEA where he is a General Partner on their healthcare team leading the medtech/healthtech practice. Josh serves on the board of Setpoint Medical, DOTS Technologies, Eargo, ExploraMed, Intrinsic Therapeutics, Moximed, Willow and Coravin. Josh holds over 300 patents and patent applications. He received an MBA from Columbia University, an MD from the NYU School of Medicine, a bachelor?s degree in Mechanical Engineering from MIT and is a Member of the College of Fellows of The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and was awarded the Coulter Award for Healthcare Innovation by the Biomedical Engineering Society in 2018.

  • Michael V. McConnell, MD, MSEE

    Michael V. McConnell, MD, MSEE

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My imaging research has involved clinical and molecular Imaging of cardiovascular disease, with a focus on coronary and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular inflammation.

    My prevention research has involved innovative technologies to reduce coronary and vascular disease, including early disease detection plus leveraging mobile health to enhance heart-healthy activities in patients and populations.

  • Mark Mercola

    Mark Mercola

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Bio Dr. Mercola is Professor of Medicine and Professor in the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. He completed postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, was on the faculty in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School for 12 years, and later at the Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Institute and Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego before relocating to Stanford in 2015.

    Prof. Mercola is known for identifying many of the factors that are responsible for inducing and forming the heart, including the discovery that Wnt inhibition is a critical step in cardiogenesis that provided the conceptual basis and reagents for the large-scale production of cardiovascular tissues from pluripotent stem cells. He has collaborated with medicinal chemists, optical engineers and software developers to pioneer the use of patient iPSC-cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, safety pharmacology and drug development. His academic research is focused on developing and using quantitative high throughput assays of patient-specific cardiomyocyte function to discover druggable targets for preserving contractile function in heart failure and promoting regeneration following ischemic injury. He co-established drug screening and assay development at the Conrad Prebys Drug Discovery Center (San Diego), which operated as one of 4 large screening centers of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular Libraries screening initiative and continues as one of the largest academic drug screening centers.

    Prof. Mercola received an NIH MERIT award for his work on heart formation, and authored over 130 papers. He holds numerous patents, including describing the invention of the first engineered dominant negative protein and small molecules for stem cell and cancer applications. He serves on multiple editorial and advisory boards, including Vala Sciences,, Regencor, The Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research and the Human Biomolecular Research Institute. His laboratory is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the PLN Foundation and the Fondation Leducq.

  • Kegan Moneghetti MBBS (hons), FRACP, PhD

    Kegan Moneghetti MBBS (hons), FRACP, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio I am a cardiologist and researcher with specialty interests in sports medicine, heart failure and exercise testing. My background includes clinical training in internal medicine and cardiology through the Royal Australasian College of Physicians. I have completed an advance cardiac imaging fellowship (Monash Heart) and a post doctoral fellowship in exercise physiology (Stanford University). I have a clinical interest cardiovascular health in those wanting to be active or who regularly exercise (athletes and non-athletes). My current research projects are aimed at defining inflammasome/metabolic pathways with exercise and optimizing the use of demographic data to predict exercise performance in healthy individuals and those with heart failure.

  • Sanjiv Narayan

    Sanjiv Narayan

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Narayan directs the Computational Arrhythmia Research Laboratory, whose goal is to define the mechanisms underlying complex human heart rhythm disorders, to develop bioengineering-focused solutions to improve therapy that will be tested in clinical trials. The laboratory has been funded continuously since 2001 by the National Institutes of Health, AHA and ACC, and interlinks a disease-focused group of clinicians, computational physicists, bioengineers and trialists.

  • Duy T Nguyen

    Duy T Nguyen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term goals of my translational research are to evaluate novel radiofrequency (RF) ablation strategies, catheter designs to improve procedural efficacy and safety outcomes, and molecular targets to enhance RF ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. We have translational and clinical studies on multiple ablation catheter designs as well as ablation strategies to improve safety and maximize RF delivery during ablation for atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. We have both in vivo and ex vivo animal models (small and large animal) of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

    At the translational level, our ablation biophysics studies include utilizing various nanomaterials to help facilitate ablation as well as designing specialized catheters to improve safety and efficacy of ablation. We are studying specific variations in catheter design to improve ablation; testing delivery methods of facilitating agents; optimizing biophysical parameters; determining the precise RF electromagnetic field to minimize collateral damage; and studying magnetic driven facilitating agents.

    At the clinical level, my research has focused on the application of biophysical principles to AF and VT ablation outcomes, in addition to research related to adult congenital heart disease. Projects include a multicenter consortium on the use of EP studies in risk stratification of sudden death for Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) patients undergoing pulmonary valve replacement; perioperative EP studies and VT ablation in ToF patients; outcomes in multicenter cohorts of ACHD patients undergoing AF and VT ablations; and outcomes in ACHD subpopulations undergoing EP procedures, such as those with bicuspid aortic valves, right atrial myopathies, and others.

  • Koen Nieman

    Koen Nieman

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and of Radiology (CV Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr Nieman investigates advanced cardiac imaging techniques. Current projects focus on the development of functional CT application for hemodynamic interpretation of coronary artery disease, and the clinical validation of cardiac CT in the management of patients with ischemic heart disease.

  • Victoria Parikh

    Victoria Parikh

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Parikh is cardiologist specializing in the care of patients with inherited cardiovascular diseases. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship at Stanford School of Medicine and her medical residency at the University of California, San Francisco. Funded by research grant from the NIH, she currently studies multiple causes of cardiomyopathy in the laboratory. She has a particular clinical and scientific interest in inherited arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies, which are an increasingly recognized disease entity. Dr. Parikh is currently using patient cohort genetics, high throughput molecular biology and human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes to study variant pathogenicity in this disease.

  • Marco Perez

    Marco Perez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Marco Perez's research goal is to better understand the fundamental causes of cardiovascular disease through the study of genetics and epidemiology. His group studies the genetic variations and environmental exposures that are associated with conditions such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure. He has led the studies of atrial fibrillation in Women's Health Initiative, one of the largest nation-wide population-based cohorts. He is currently conducting a large study monitoring for silent or asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in women from the WHI randomized to exercise intervention, and is co-PI in the Apple Heart Study, a clinical trial using the Apple Watch to screen for atrial fibrillation. He is interested in understanding the paradox that atrial fibrillation is less common in African Americans and Hispanics, despite a greater burden of risk factors such as hypertension. As director of the Stanford Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic, he evaluates families with rare inherited arrhythmias associated with sudden death such as Long QT and Brugada Syndromes and explores their links with novel genes. He is particularly interested in studying the genetic causes of very early onset atrial fibrillation. He also studies how best to use the electrocardiogram to identify patients at risk for atrial fibrillation and athletes at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias due to conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. His genetic studies have led to the discovery of promising novel therapeutic targets that his group is now studying at a functional level. Dr. Perez receives funding from NIH/NHLBI (R01), Apple Inc., the Weston Havens Foundation, The Stanford Cardiovascular Division and the Stanford SPARK program.

  • Richard Popp

    Richard Popp

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Academic-Industrial relations; Ethics of invention.

  • Thomas Quertermous, MD

    Thomas Quertermous, MD

    William G. Irwin Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Understanding genetic basis of cardiovascular function and disease.

  • Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Risheen Reejhsinghani obtained her medical degree in Mumbai, India, followed by an internal medicine residency at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston, MA and cardiology fellowship at Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine, where she served as one of the chief fellows. She subsequently completed an advanced echocardiography fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, and is board certified in echocardiography, general cardiology, and nuclear cardiology.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani practices as a general cardiologist in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she also serves as the Associate Director for the hospital-based Consultative Cardiology Service. As a clinical cardiologist, she believes strongly in the tenets of evidence-based practice, diagnostic cognizance, and patient education. She also has a specific interest in the burgeoning field of Cardio-Rheumatology, focused on cardiac diseases among patients with rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, among others. Her clinical research in this area has focused on the evaluation of structural cardiac disease and diastolic dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis patients, primarily using echocardiography.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani has a strong interest in medical education, and believes that instilling a love for bedside medicine and the physical exam is the soundest way to empower future generations of learners. To this end, she received additional training in clinical teaching and simulation at the University of California, San Francisco. She has worked extensively on curriculum design, including the co-development of a pilot echocardiography simulation training program for incoming cardiology fellows. She currently serves as the faculty Co-Lead/Associate Course Director for Quarter 3 in the Practice of Medicine Course for first year medical students at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Reejhsinghani also enjoys writing, particularly about medical education, and has written articles for national newspapers overseas, among other publications.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Fatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. She received her MD and MPH from Harvard and completed her cardiovascular fellowship at Stanford. She has expertise in cardiovascular prevention and promoting health equity in cardiovascular care and research. She completed her residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and a fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University. She specializes in common cardiac conditions such as coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez?s research includes a range of topics relating to racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention and developing novel interventions to address disparities.

  • Karim Sallam, MD

    Karim Sallam, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Karim Sallam, MD, is trained in Cardiovascular Medicine and Advanced Heart Failure.

  • Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research continues to be in the field of echocardiography. Several areas of research are currently being pursued.

  • John S. Schroeder, MD

    John S. Schroeder, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Clinical Pharmocology of Cardiovascular Drugs
    (a) Calcium Channel Blockers
    (b) Agents for Heart Failure
    (c) Anti-atherosclerotic Effects of Cardiovascular Drugs, e.g. Calcium Channel Blockers

    2. Cardiac Transplantation/Congestive Heart Failure

    3. Coronary Artery Spasm

  • Katharine Edwards

    Katharine Edwards

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Potential impact of brief behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, coping, medical adherence, and cardiovascular health among cardiac patients.

    Psychosocial challenges of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD).

    Assessment and training in evidence-based psychological therapies.

  • George Segall

    George Segall

    Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Scintigraphic evaluation of coronary blood flow and myocardial function using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Tumor imaging and characterization of pulmonary nodules with PET/CT.

  • Kinya Seo

    Kinya Seo

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Dr. Kinya Seo's primary research focus is on the determinants of myocardial function in the normal and diseased heart toward the goal for developing new therapies for heart failure. On a technical level, he possesses an unparalleled range of skills in molecular and cell biology, biomedical engineering, and model organisms research. He received his graduate training at the University of Tokyo, where he studied cardiac mechanics, electrophysiology, and computer simulation to investigate the mechanisms of arrhythmias induced by mechanical stimuli. After he received Ph.D., he moved to Baltimore to work in the laboratory of Dr. David Kass at Johns Hopkins University. He extended his skills and expertise toward the understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure with special focus on the influence of mechanical stimuli. After postdoctoral training, he went back to Japan working at Jichi Medical University as an assistant professor, where he developed intravital imaging technologies for cardiovascular events. These skills will allow him to extend his studies from cells to organs, and to human to perform translational study for heart diseases.

  • Rahul P Sharma, MBBS, FRACP

    Rahul P Sharma, MBBS, FRACP

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transcatheter valve therapies, CT valve imaging, AI and device innovation

  • Joshua M. Spin

    Joshua M. Spin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Spin began his research career studying the structural biology of low density lipoprotein, and has been augmenting his skills with intensive training in molecular biology techniques, particularly those involving high-throughput genetic expression profiling. He is especially interested in vascular smooth muscle cells, and the role of smooth muscle differentiation and phenotypic switching in development and vascular disease. His latest work has focused on the biology of aortic aneurysms.

  • Jeffrey Teuteberg

    Jeffrey Teuteberg

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Teuteberg is board certified in Cardiology and Heart Failure and Transplantation. He is currently the Section Chief of Heart Failure, Cardiac Transplantation, and Mechanical Circulatory Support. He sees patients both in the clinic and in the hospital with advanced heart failure and who have received cardiac transplantation or mechanical circulatory support.

    His research interests are in clinical outcomes in patients after transplant and mechanical support as well as novel approaches to immunosuppression. He has participated in many single-center and multi-institutional research studies and has published widely in the fields of transplant and mechanical support. He will serve as President of the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation in 2018.

  • Jennifer Tremmel

    Jennifer Tremmel

    Susan P. and Riley P. Bechtel Medical Director and Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Tremmel studies sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Current research projects include evaluating sex differences in coronary pathophysiology, young patients presenting with myocardial infarction, the impact of stress on anginal symptoms, chronic total coronary occlusions, and vascular access site complications.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Minang (Mintu) Turakhia

    Minang (Mintu) Turakhia

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Turakhia has an active clinical research program, with funding from AHA, VA, NIH, the medical device industry, and foundations. His research program aims to improve the treatment of heart rhythm disorders, with an emphasis on atrial fibrillation, by evaluating quality and variation of care, comparative and cost-effectiveness of therapies, and risk prediction. Dr. Turakhia has extensive expertise in using large administrative and claims databases for this work. His TREAT-AF retrospective study of over 500,000 patients with newly-diagnosed AF is the largest known research cohort of AF patients. He has served as study PI or chairman of several prominent single- and multicenter trials in atrial fibrillation, investigational devices for electrophysiology procedures, digital health interventions, and sensor technologies.

    His other research interests include technology assessment of new device-based therapies and the impact of changing health policy and reform on the delivery of arrhythmia care. Dr. Turakhia is a Fellow of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and Heart Rhythm Society.

  • Randall Vagelos, MD

    Randall Vagelos, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I. Congestive Heart Failure New Medical Therapies Prognostic Evaluation Selection for Cardiac Transplantation II. Screening for Myocardial Necrosis New ECG Monitoring Devices New Serum Markers III. Screening for CAD Patients Who Have Received Radiation Rx Diabetics Being Considered for Renal Transplantation
    IV. Advanced coronary and valvular disease, evaluationg candidacy for high risk interventions.

  • Hannah Valantine

    Hannah Valantine

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab is focused on understanding the mechanism mediating acute and chronic allograft failure, in particular on the role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure and the mechanisms of mediating transplant coronary artery disease. 1. Role of microvascular injury in acute allograft failure.

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Translational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

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