School of Medicine


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  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Themistocles (Tim) Assimes

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Genetic Epidemiology, Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits related to Cardiovasular Medicine, Coronary Artery Disease related pathway analyses and integrative genomics, Mendelian randomization studies, risk prediction for major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular medicine related pharmacogenomics, ethnic differences in the determinants of Insulin Mediated Glucose Uptake, pharmacoepidemiology of cardiovascular drugs & outcomes

  • Laurence Baker

    Laurence Baker

    Professor of Health Research and Policy and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Baker's research is in the area of health economics, and focuses on the effects of financial incentives, organizational structures, and government policies on the health care delivery system, health care costs, and health outcomes.

  • Eran Bendavid

    Eran Bendavid

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Effect of global health policies on health of individuals in developing countries, global health, HIV and TB.

  • Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy and of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations.

  • Daniel Bloch

    Daniel Bloch

    Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus

    Bio I received my PhD. in Mathematical Statistics in 1967. I joined the research community at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, in 1984 as head statistician directing the biostatistics consulting and analytic support of the Arthritis Rheumatism Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) and Multipurpose Arthritis Center (MAC) grant-related research programs. In 1993 I was appointed Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, and am currently Professor of Biostatistics at Stanford University, emeritus since 2007. My contributions to the statistics literature span numerous fields, including methods of sample size estimation, efficiency and bias of estimators, research methods for kappa statistics, non-parametric classification methods and methods of assessing multi-parameter endpoints. I have over 200 peer-reviewed publications. I have been directly involved with the development of numerous criteria rules for classification of diseases and with establishing guidelines for clinical trial research and in proposing responder criteria for osteoarthritis drugs. Since 1987, I have been a consultant on an ad hoc basis to pharmaceutical and biotechnical firms, including both start-up and established companies. I have extensive experience with devices, drugs and biologics and have participated in all aspects of applying statistics to implement investigational plans; e.g.: for protocol development, design of trials, database design. I?ve been a member of the FDA Statistical Advisors Panel, the statistical member on numerous data safety monitoring boards, and frequently represent companies at meetings with the FDA

  • M. Kate Bundorf

    M. Kate Bundorf

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research) and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Professor Bundorf's research focuses on health insurance markets including the determinants and effects of individual and purchaser choices, the effects of regulation in insurance markets, the interaction of public and private systems of health insurance, incentives for insurers to improve health care quality and the organization of provider markets.

  • Suzan Carmichael

    Suzan Carmichael

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology), of Obstetrics & Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Carmichael is a perinatal and nutritional epidemiologist and Professor of Pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on finding ways to improve maternal and infant health. Exposure themes include nutrition, social context, care, environmental contaminants and genetics. Outcome themes include severe maternal morbidity, stillbirth, birth defects, and preterm delivery. She is particularly interested in understanding the intersectionality of these varied types of exposures and outcomes and how they interact to impact health and health disparities, for the mother-baby dyad.

  • David Chan

    David Chan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (PCOR) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio David Chan, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine, an investigator at the Department of Veterans Affairs, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Drawing on labor and organizational economics, he is interested in studying how information is used in health care, how this affects productivity, and implications for design. He is the recipient of the 2014 NIH Director?s High-Risk, High-Reward Early Independence Award to study the optimal balance of information in health information technology for patient care.

    Dr. Chan received master?s degrees in policy and economics from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he studied as a Marshall scholar. He holds a medical degree from UCLA and a PhD in economics from MIT. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and was an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, prior to coming to Palo Alto, where he currently is a hospitalist at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto.

  • Glenn M. Chertow

    Glenn M. Chertow

    Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests clinical epidemiology, health services research, decision sciences, clinical trials in acute and chronic kidney disease

  • Irene Corso

    Irene Corso

    Senior Lecturer in Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests involve doctor-patient relationship and communication strategies as they pertain to (1) the development and instruction of medical Spanish curriculum, (2) satisfaction in health care delivery with emphasis on cross cultural competency issues, and (3) the effectiveness of interpretive systems in health care settings.

  • Mark R. Cullen, MD

    Mark R. Cullen, MD

    Director, Center for Population Health Sciences, Senior Associate Dean for Research-School of Medicine, Senior Associate Vice Provost, Professor of Medicine, of Biomedical Data Science, of Health Research & Policy & Senior Fellow at SIEPR

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Social and environmental determinants of health; role of workplace physical environment and work organization as causes of chronic disease and disability

  • Manisha Desai

    Manisha Desai

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Desai is the Director of the Quantitative Sciences Unit. She is interested in the application of biostatistical methods to all areas of medicine including oncology, nephrology, and endocrinology. She works on methods for the analysis of epidemiologic studies, clinical trials, and studies with missing observations.

  • Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Bing Director of the Program in Human Biology, Beirne Family Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Professor of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at SUMC

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical neuro-oncology: My research explores the epidemiology, natural history, and disease patterns of brain tumors in childhood, as well as prospective clinical trials for treating these neoplasms. Research interests also include neurologic effects of cancer and its therapies, and childhood headaches.

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care & Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Bio Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine, a Core Faculty Member at the Centers for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research, and a Faculty Affiliate of the Stanford Center on Longevity and Stanford Center for International Development. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Mary Kane Goldstein

    Mary Kane Goldstein

    Professor of Medicine (Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Health services research in primary care and geriatrics: developing, implementing, and evaluating methods for clinical quality improvement. Current work includes applying health information technology to quality improvement through clinical decision support (CDS) integrated with electronic health records; encoding clinical knowledge into computable formats in automated knowledge bases; natural language processing of free text in electronic health records; analyzing multiple comorbidities

  • Steven Goodman

    Steven Goodman

    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in issues relating to the representation and measurement of evidence in medical research, and determinants of the truth of medical findings, using a Bayesian framework. I also do work in evidence synthesis, comparative effectiveness research, and the ethics of clinical research.

  • Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Adolescent Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focuses on developmental, cognitive and psychosocial factors involved in adolescents? and young adults? health-related decision-making, perceptions of risk and vulnerability, health communication and risk behavior. My research has focused on understanding and reducing health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, alcohol and marijuana use, risky driving, and risky sexual behavior.

  • Paul Heidenreich, MD

    Paul Heidenreich, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include

    1) The cost-effectiveness of new cardiovascular technologies.
    Example: tests to screen asymptomatic patients for left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    2) Interventions to improve the quality of care of patients with heart disease. Examples: include clinical reminders and home monitoring.

    3) Outcomes research using existing clinical and administrative datasets.

    4) Use of echocardiography to predict prognosis (e.g. diastolic dysfunction).

  • Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS

    Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests:
    (1) Risk factors for age-associated cognitive decline and for dementia.
    (2) Therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive function in aging and in dementia.
    (3) Brain-–behavior relations as they pertain to human cognition.

  • Mark Hlatky, MD

    Mark Hlatky, MD

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research) and of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research work is in "outcomes research", especially examining the field of cardiovascular medicine. Particular areas of interest are the integration of economic and quality of life data into randomized clinical trials, evidence-based medicine, decision models, and cost-effectiveness analysis. I am also interested in the application of novel genetic, biomarker, and imaging tests to assess risk and guide clinical management of coronary artery disease.

  • Ann Hsing

    Ann Hsing

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center/Cancer Institute) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research Focus
    ? Epidemiology of prostate, hepatobiliary, and thyroid cancers
    ? Racial disparities in cancer
    ? Endogenous hormones/growth factors
    ? Circadian rhythms
    ? Chronic inflammation
    ? Genetic susceptibility
    ? Cancer prevention and control
    ? Global oncology and international studies

  • Erik Ingelsson

    Erik Ingelsson

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the link between metabolic disturbances, such as obesity and insulin resistance, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Our research is translational and interdisciplinary, combining population-based studies with molecular biology to reach new insights into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and related conditions, identification of new biomarkers for improved risk prediction, and discovery of novel drug targets.

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    C. F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Meta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My interests include applications of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I aim to improve the outcomes of women's cancers through clinically-oriented research on genetic risk assessment, risk-adapted screening and prevention.

  • Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Angelle Desiree LaBeaud

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Arthropod-borne viruses are emerging and re-emerging infections that are spreading throughout the world. Our laboratory investigates the epidemiology of arboviral infections, focusing on the burden of disease and the long-term complications on human health. In particular, Dr. LaBeaud investigates dengue, chikungunya, and Rift Valley fever viruses in Kenya, where outbreaks cause fever, arthritis, retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. Our main research questions focus on the risk factors for arboviral infections, the development of diagnostic tests that can be administered in the field to quickly determine what kind of arboviral infection a person has, and the genetic and immunologic investigation of why different people respond differently to the same infection. Our long-term goals are to contribute to a deeper understanding of arboviral infections and their long-term health consequences and to optimize control strategies to prevent these emerging infections. Our laboratory also investigates the effects of antenatal and postnatal parasitic infections on vaccine responses, growth, and development of Kenyan children.

    My lab at Stanford supports the field work that is ongoing in Kenya, but we also have several projects that are based locally. We strive to improve diagnostics of arboviral infections and are using Luminex technology to build a new screening assay. We also have created a Luminex based platform to assess vaccine responses against multiple pathogens.

  • Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am a clinical scientist (PhD epidemiology), endocrinologist, and CMO at VAPA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center . My group does pattern and prediction mapping along the life-course of interventions/outcomes and how healthcare system can positively impact health longitudinally. We use novel molecular epi, 'big' data like EHRs with advanced new designs/methods/technologies. These interests cut across multiple complex chronic diseases, aging, & critical lifespan stages.

  • Mary Leonard

    Mary Leonard

    Arline and Pete Harman Professor and Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My multidisciplinary research program is focused on (1) the detrimental effects of glucocorticoids, sarcopenia and inflammation on bone development in pediatric diseases, (2) the long-term effects of childhood cancer on bone and muscle quality, (3) the assessment of renal osteodystrophy using novel micro-imaging techniques, (4) the effects of vitamin D deficiency on physical function and cardiovascular disease, and (5) the evaluation of biomechanical interventions as anabolic bone therapies.

  • Eleni Linos, MD, MPH, DrPH

    Eleni Linos, MD, MPH, DrPH

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio Eleni Linos MD, MPH, DrPH, is Professor of Dermatology at Stanford University. Her work focuses on public health, cancer prevention and geriatric dermatology. Dr. Linos is dually trained in epidemiology and dermatology and is the principal investigator of several NIH funded studies aimed at improving the lives of patients with skin disease. She received her medical degree from Cambridge and Oxford universities in the UK, then trained in epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and completed her dermatology residency at Stanford.

  • Ying Lu

    Ying Lu

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging) and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Biostatistics, clinical trials, statistical evaluation of medical diagnostic tests, radiology, osteoporosis, meta-analysis, medical decisoin making

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Luby?s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries. He works primarily in Bangladesh.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr David M. Maahs is Professor of Pediatrics and Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico?s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado?s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs? leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as a Steering Committee member and Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as Secretary-General for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2016-20) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He currently serves on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ?Pink Panther,? which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, and prevent diabetic complications. He is author or co-author of over 250 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their children, Nicholas (20) and Natalia (15).

  • Alex Macario MD MBA

    Alex Macario MD MBA

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Macario studies health care economics & outcomes, with a special focus on surgery and anesthesia. He is well known for helping develop the field of operating room management, and is keenly interested in the cost-effectiveness analyses of drugs and devices. For the past decade Dr. Macario has added medical education as a research priority to better understand methods to best teach students and residents. Google Scholar calculates Dr. Macario?s H-Index as 45 and his I-10 as 99.

  • Yvonne Maldonado

    Yvonne Maldonado

    Senior Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Diversity, Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on epidemiologic aspects of viral vaccines and perinatal HIV infection. This includes the molecular epidemiology of factors affecting the immunogenicity of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in developing areas of the world, and now the epidemiology of transmission and circulation of vaccine derived polioviruses in order to assist in global eradication of polio. I also work in development of methods to prevent breastfeeding transmission of HIV in Africa.

  • Michelle Mello

    Michelle Mello

    Professor of Law and of Health Research and Policy

    Bio Michelle Mello is a leading empirical health law scholar whose research is focused on understanding the effects of law and regulation on health care delivery and population health outcomes. She is the author of more than 190 articles and book chapters on the medical malpractice system, medical errors and patient safety, public health law, regulation pf pharmaceuticals, biomedical research ethics and governance, obesity policy, and other topics. The recipient of a number of awards for her research, she was elected to the National Academy of Medicine at the age of 40.

    From 2000 to 2014, Dr. Mello was a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, where she directed the School?s Program in Law and Public Health. She has also served as a Lab Fellow at Harvard University?s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.

    Dr. Mello teaches courses in torts and public health law. She holds a J.D. from the Yale Law School, a Ph.D. in Health Policy and Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an M.Phil. from Oxford University, where she was a Marshall Scholar, and a B.A. from Stanford University.

  • Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Lorene Nelson, PhD

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests: (i) genetic and environmental determinants of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, (ii) transdisciplinary strategies for improving population health.

  • Michelle Odden

    Michelle Odden

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio Michelle Odden, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Health Research and Policy. Her research aims to improve our understanding of the optimal preventive strategies for chronic disease in older adults, particularly those who have been underrepresented in research including the very old, frail, and racial/ethnic minorities. Her work has focused on prevention of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes, as well as preservation of physical and cognitive function in older adults. She is also strongly interested in epidemiological and statistical methods to reduce biases in observational studies. Dr. Odden came to Stanford from Oregon State University, where she helped build the new College of Public Health and Human Sciences. She completed her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley (2009), a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco in Primary Care Research (2011).

  • Doug Owens

    Doug Owens

    Henry J. Kaiser, Jr. Professor, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Management Science and Engineering and of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research uses decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and meta-analysis to evaluate clinical and health policy problems.

  • Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Palaniappan has completed over 80 studies spanning 20 years in diverse and understudied populations, chronic disease, and prevention. She has expertise in epidemiological research using large databases, use of electronic health records for research, and clinical trials.

  • Lesley Park

    Lesley Park

    Instructor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences (PHS)
    Associate Director, Education (2019-present)
    Director, PHS Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-present)
    Associate Director, Research and Data Strategy (2016-2019)

    Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
    Cancer Core Co-Director

    Dr. Lesley Park is one of the leaders of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences and the VACS Cancer Core. PHS aims to provide a central hub where researchers can efficiently access, link, visualize, and analyze data from a wide variety of sources to ultimately facilitate transdisciplinary population health science research. Within the VACS, Dr. Park oversees cancer outcomes research in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Her research experience has focused on the intersection of cancer and HIV, examining epidemiologic methods for cancer research, cancer incidence trends, and cancer (particularly hepatocellular carcinoma) prevention in PLWHA. Dr. Park is an experienced epidemiologist, skilled in observational research, survival analysis, and SAS programming. Her prior experience includes research at the Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research (CBAR) at the Harvard School of Public Health and at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Suzann Pershing

    Suzann Pershing

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Dr. Pershing is on the ophthalmology faculty at Stanford University School of Medicine and serves as Chief of Ophthalmology for the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, with an academic career blending clinical practice, teaching, research, and administration.

    Her research interests focus on improved utilization of big data, biomedical informatics techniques, and evidence-based medicine to study outcomes, health care utilization, disease progression, and cost-effectiveness of ophthalmic treatment. Through these, she aims to provide additional information to policymakers and clinicians in order to optimize treatment and policy decisions. She is also interested in health care innovation ? technology as well as quality and delivery systems. Dr. Pershing is active in big data initiatives and analysis, including collaborative projects at Stanford and serving on the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) IRIS registry working group and as the AAO representative to the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM).

    She graduated from university summa cum laude in 2002, and with high honors from medical school in 2006. During medical school, she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha national medical honor society, served as chapter president in her final year, and was honored with the President?s Clinical Science Award, Merck Award for Academic Excellence, and American Medical Women?s Association Commendation. She subsequently completed ophthalmology residency at Stanford University, followed by an AHRQ fellowship in Health Care Research and Health Policy through the Center for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research. She presently oversees eye care services at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center.

    Dr. Pershing also serves on the national board of directors of the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society, with focus on resident initiatives, and mentors both medical students and undergraduate students (through the Stanford Immersion in Medicine series and VA clinical internships in ophthalmology). Dr. Pershing has had an interest in teaching since tutoring fellow students in college and medical school. She is currently course director for the medical student ophthalmology clerkships, Ophth 300A and 301A, and sponsors students for research projects in health policy and health services research through MedScholars and other funding sources.

  • Rita Popat

    Rita Popat

    Clinical Associate Professor, Health Research & Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest focuses on the epidemiology of Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, specifically evaluating the genetic and environmental contributions to these neurodegenerative disorders. I am also interested in studying the relation of cognition, estradiol exposure (endogenous and exogenous), and genetic factors.

  • James Quinn

    James Quinn

    Professor of Emergency Medicine and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Quinn's primary focus is on running large network based emergency care clinical trials. He has an extensive research background in clinical decision making involving patients with syncope and in the development and clinical evaluation of tissue adhesives.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Endowed Professor in Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Maya Rossin-Slater

    Maya Rossin-Slater

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Maya Rossin-Slater is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also a Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic and Policy Research (SIEPR), a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA). She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University in 2013, and was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara from 2013 to 2017, prior to coming to Stanford. Rossin-Slater?s research includes work in health, public, and labor economics. She focuses on issues in maternal and child well-being, family structure and behavior, and policies targeting disadvantaged populations in the United States and other developed countries. She is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and has published articles in a variety of peer-reviewed journals, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Public Economics, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Kristin Sainani (n e Cobb)

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Science writing, science communication, biostatistics. Research areas: osteoporosis, stress fractures, sports injuries, female athlete triad.

  • Joshua Salomon

    Joshua Salomon

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research), Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Joshua Salomon is a Professor of Medicine and a core faculty member in the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on priority-setting in global health, within three main substantive areas: (1) measurement and valuation of health outcomes; (2) modeling patterns and trends in major causes of global mortality and disease burden; and (3) evaluation of health interventions and policies.

    Dr. Salomon is an investigator on projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, relating to modeling of infectious and chronic diseases and associated intervention strategies; methods for economic evaluation of public health programs; measurement of the global burden of disease; and assessment of the potential impact and cost effectiveness of new health technologies.

    He is Director of the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab, which is a multi-institution research consortium that conducts health and economic modeling relating to infectious disease. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Dr. Salomon was Professor of Global Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Primary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy in the Epidemiology Division, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard? studies outcomes in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, but has shifted much of her focus to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. She is also interested in disentangling social and biological constructs in the reported disparities in SLE with respect to sex, gender, race, and ethnicity, both from the etiologic and outcomes perspectives.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D a Professor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, (SPRC) and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Dr. Stefanicks research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. Her work on the effects of menopausal hormones on cardiovascular and other health outcomes in mostly healthy postmenopausal women (in the Womens Health Initiative, WHI), in women with established heart disease, (the Heart and Estrogen-progesterone Replacement Study, HERS), and in peri-menopausal and early post-menopausal women (the Postmenopausal Estrogen and Progesterone Interventions, PEPI) trials has been widely disseminated both nationally and internationally. She was also the principal investigator of two large diet trials focusing on the role of a low-fat eating pattern (including increased vegetables & fruits) on preventing breast cancer (WHI) and recurrence (Womens Healthy Eating and Living, WHEL, trial) and she conducted several medium-sized diet, exercise, and weight control trials focused on heart disease risk and body composition that have influenced national guidelines. [She is currently writing a proposal for a large national trial of physical activity in older women with cardiovascular outcomes, not just risk factors.] Her current passion is the study of Sex (and Gender) Differences in Human Physiology and Disease, the title of a course she teaches in Stanfords Human Biology program, in addition to a course entitled: Current Topics and Controversies in Womens Health. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles in Stanfords Cardiovascular Institutes Womens Heart Health Program and Stanford Cancer Institutes Cancer Prevention and Control Program.
    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research directed her to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at SPRC, which has been her academic home for nearly 30 years.

  • Eric Sun

    Eric Sun

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research examines questions of health economics and health policy, with a focus on economics and policy in the perioperative setting. Current research topics include the economics of treatments for chronic pain, as well as how physician practice organization affects outcomes and costs.

  • Holly Tabor

    Holly Tabor

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on ethical issues in genetics and genomics, specifically return of results and translation for exome and whole genome sequencing and translation of genomic sequencing into the clinical setting. I also conduct research on ethical issues in clinical care and research for patients and families with autism and other developmental and cognitive disabilities.

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and of Medicine (PCOR) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Health Services Research)

    Bio Dr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 2) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 3) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 4) engaging in healthcare reform.

  • Dee W. West

    Dee W. West

    Professor of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests - Cancer etiology (diet, familial, genetic), especially breast, prostate and colon cancer
    - Cancer surveillance (Cancer registration, cancer patterns)
    - Cancer outcomes (Survival, quality of life, quality of care)

  • Alice S Whittemore

    Alice S Whittemore

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Biomedical Data Science, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cancers of the prostate, breast and ovary account for a major proportion of new cancer cases and cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. Our recent research focus has been on developing improved statistical methods for the design and conduct of studies involving hereditary predisposition and modifiable lifestyle characteristics in the etiologies of site-specific cancers.

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