School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 19 Results

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests One of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Steven Chu

    Steven Chu

    William R. Kenan Jr. Professor and Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Synthesis, functionalization and applications of nanoparticle bioprobes for molecular cellular in vivo imaging in biology and biomedicine. Linear and nonlinear difference frequency mixing ultrasound imaging. Lithium metal-sulfur batteries, new approaches to electrochemical splitting of water. CO2 reduction, lithium extraction from salt water

  • Ron Dror

    Ron Dror

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab?s research focuses on computational biology, with an emphasis on 3D molecular structure. We combine two approaches: (1) Bottom-up: given the basic physics governing atomic interactions, use simulations to predict molecular behavior; (2) Top-down: given experimental data, use machine learning to predict molecular structures and properties. We collaborate closely with experimentalists and apply our methods to the discovery of safer, more effective drugs.

  • Liang Feng

    Liang Feng

    Assistant Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the structure, dynamics and function of eukaryotic transport proteins mediating ions and major nutrients crossing the membrane, the kinetics and regulation of transport processes, the catalytic mechanism of membrane embedded enzymes and the development of small molecule modulators based on the structure and function of membrane proteins.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Miriam B. Goodman

    Miriam B. Goodman

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the molecular events that give rise to the sensation of touch and temperature in C. elegans. To do this, we use a combination of quantitative behavioral analysis, genetics, in vivo electrophysiology, and heterologous expression of ion channels. We also collaborate with Pruitt's group in Mechanical Engineering to develop and fabricate novel devices for the study of sensory transduction.

  • John Huguenard

    John Huguenard

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are interested in the neuronal mechanisms that underlie synchronous oscillatory activity in the thalamus, cortex and the massively interconnected thalamocortical system. Such oscillations are related to cognitive processes, normal sleep activities and certain forms of epilepsy. Our approach is an analysis of the discrete components (cells, synapses, microcircuits) that make up thalamic and cortical circuits, and reconstitution of components into in silico computational networks.

  • Brian Kobilka

    Brian Kobilka

    Helene Irwin Fagan Chair in Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structure, function and physiology of adrenergic receptors.

  • Richard Lewis

    Richard Lewis

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling with a focus on store-operated CRAC channels and their essential roles in T cell development and function. Currently we aim to define the molecular mechanism for CRAC channel activation and the means by which calcium signal dynamics mediate specific activation of transcription factors and T-cell genes during development.

  • Daniel V. Madison

    Daniel V. Madison

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is interested in the function and plasticity CNS synapses, including studies of the detailed structure and protein content of synapses in different plastic states. We also have a strong interest in the pathophysiology of Azheimer?s disease as related to endocannabinoids. We use primarily electrophysiogy and high-resolution array tomographic imaging to dissect the function of synapses undergoing changes due either to external stimuli, disease states or internal modulation.

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