School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 20 Results

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of ?suites? of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Margo Thienemann

    Margo Thienemann

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Disorder

  • Robert Tibshirani

    Robert Tibshirani

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is in applied statistics and biostatistics. I specialize in computer-intensive methods for regression and classification, bootstrap, cross-validation and statistical inference, and signal and image analysis for medical diagnosis.

  • Seda Tierney

    Seda Tierney

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Assessment of vascular health s in children by non-invasive modalities

    Echocardiography and outcomes in congenital heart disease

  • Alice Ting

    Alice Ting

    Professor of Genetics, of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We develop chemogenetic and optogenetic technologies for probing and manipulating protein networks, cellular RNA, and the function of mitochondria and the mammalian brain. Our technologies draw from enzyme engineering, directed evolution, chemical biology, organic synthesis, high-resolution microscopy, genetics, and computational analysis.

  • Katherine Travis

    Katherine Travis

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics)

    Bio Dr. Katherine Travis is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Travis obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of California San Diego. Dr. Travis came to Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow to obtain training in clinical neuroscience and translational approaches to intervention. As part of her training, she was awarded a K99/R00 Pathway to Independence grant from the National Institutes of Health.

    Her research uses human neuroimaging and behavioral measures to examine the neural bases of early language learning in infants and young children. The goal of her research is to develop therapies and interventions to help promote language learning outcomes in children at-risk for learning disabilities. Currently, she directs an NIH-funded clinical trial that will use diffusion MRI to assess whether there are changes in brain structure following a language intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for preterm infants.

  • Jennifer Tremmel

    Jennifer Tremmel

    Susan P. and Riley P. Bechtel Medical Director and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Tremmel studies sex differences in cardiovascular disease. Current research projects include evaluating sex differences in coronary pathophysiology, young patients presenting with myocardial infarction, the impact of stress on anginal symptoms, chronic total coronary occlusions, and vascular access site complications.

  • Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Philip S. Tsao, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our primary interests are in the molecular underpinnings of vascular disease as well as assessing disease risk. In addition to targeted investigation of specific signaling molecules, we utilize global genomic analysis to identify gene expression networks and regulatory units. We are particularly interested in the role of microRNAs in gene expression pathways associated with disease.

  • Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Chi-Ho Ban Tsui

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult-MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Tsui completed his medical training at Dalhousie University, Halifax, in 1995 after obtaining his Masters of Science in Pharmacy in 1991. These degrees followed a Diploma in Engineering and Bachelors of Science in both Mathematics and Pharmacy. Dr. Tsui completed his anesthesia residency training at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton in 2000, and he received further experience in pediatric anesthesia at British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver. After 16 years of practice at the University of Alberta Hospital and Stollery Children?s Hospital, Dr. Tsui was recruited to Stanford University.

    Currently, Dr. Tsui is a Medical Center Line (MCL) Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. In his position as an adult and pediatric anesthesiologist at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital, he specializes in regional anesthesia techniques.

    Dr. Tsui is an avid and internationally recognized researcher in many areas of regional anesthesia. During his residency, Dr. Tsui developed an interest in improving the accuracy of epidural catheter placement and was issued a U.S. patent in relation to his research. Dr. Tsui has expanded his research into the use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia, with particular relevance to peripheral nerve block performance. Dr. Tsui is also responsible for development of the E-Catheter catheter-over-needle kit for use during peripheral nerve blocks. The primary objective of his research is to transform regional anesthesia from an ?art? into a reliable and reproducible ?science? by further exploring the basic scientific and clinical aspects of electrophysiological signal monitoring and integrating this with the latest advances in ultrasound.

    Dr. Tsui has received the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) Clinical Scholar award and has previously received research awards and grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Anesthesiologists? Society, AHFMR, and University of Alberta. In 2015, a prestigious award, the CAS Research Recognition Award, was presented by the Canadian Anesthesiologists? Society to Dr. Tsui "in recognition of significant research contributions to regional anesthesia, acute pain management and pediatric anesthesia in Canada and around the world".

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