School of Medicine


Showing 61-70 of 76 Results

  • Lea Steffes

    Lea Steffes

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    Bio Dr. Steffes, a Wisconsin native, completed medical school and pediatric residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She then moved to the Bay Area and completed her clinical fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at Stanford University in 2020. Additionally, Dr. Steffes received further post-doctoral training in the laboratories of Dr. Maya Kumar and Dr. David Cornfield, studying the cellular and molecular mechanism driving pulmonary vascular disease. In addition to her role as an Instructor in Pediatrics in the division of Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. Steffes is also completing an advanced clinical fellowship in Pulmonary Hypertension at Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital Stanford. Her clinical work consists of caring for patients with pediatric pulmonary and pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, interstitial lung disease, respiratory failure, chronic cough and asthma. Her research is focused on the vascular changes seen in pulmonary hypertension, more specifically understanding the cellular characteristics of occlusive neointimal lesions, the abnormal cells that block pulmonary blood flow in pulmonary hypertension. In her most recent work, Dr. Steffes identified a subset of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells that are the cell of origin for the pathologic neointimal cells and a specific signaling pathway, that when blocked, inhibits the formation of neointimal lesions.

    Dr. Steffes is currently employing advanced single cell sequencing technologies to further understand neointimal cells with the ultimate goal identifying new therapies for pulmonary hypertension, a fatal disease with no known cure.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Lindsay Stevens

    Lindsay Stevens

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical Informatics is the scientific field concerned with the application of information technology to the delivery of healthcare services. In my current role as a lead physician in this department, I work with my colleagues to evaluate the best ways to implement and optimize health information technology to benefit the patients we serve at Stanford Children's Health. Specific areas of focus include: Improving EMR education for clinicians and merging Health IT with medical education.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    The Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. We are also study the causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

  • Terrell Stevenson

    Terrell Stevenson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Bio Dr. Terrell Stevenson specializes in the care of hospitalized children. She works both at Stanford and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. She has particular interests in community pediatric hospital medicine (including care of well babies and coverage of NICU/PICU patients), advocacy, the hospitalist's role in comfort care, and teaching medical trainees.

  • Elizabeth Stuart

    Elizabeth Stuart

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary professional interests include teaching and curriculum design around patient-centered and cross-cultural communication, clinical reasoning, and performance assessment. My clinical teaching emphasizes role modeling and reflection on doctor-patient interactions and clinical decision-making.

  • Felice Su

    Felice Su

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical pharmacology research is focused on investigating the impact of dynamic organ function on drug disposition and designing dosing strategies based on mathematical models that account for these changes in order to optimize safe medication administration in critically ill children.

    Research through the REVIVE Initiative for Resuscitation Excellence investigates the quality of resuscitation during cardiopulmonary arrest. Areas of focus include early identification during the no-flow state prior to CPR initiation and quality of CPR simulation education.

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