School of Medicine


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  • Neha Shah

    Neha Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Bio My clinical and research interests lie in Integrative Rheumatology, healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole patient, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies, including those outside the realm of allopathic medicine. Specifically, I am interested in exploring the impact of diet/nutrition/botanicals on inflammation as it pertains to rheumatic diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriatic arthritis and other autoimmune conditions, as well as studying the impact of other lifestyle approaches such as mindful meditation, sleep, yoga, stress reduction, etc. on disease burden and quality of life of patients with rheumatic diseases.

  • Stanford Shoor

    Stanford Shoor

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Patient Centered Care in Rheumatic Disease
    Sarcoidosis

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Associate Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women?s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford?s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, but her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This fueled a number of collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was recently awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as SLE. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epi focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities.

  • Samuel Strober

    Samuel Strober

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms of immune tolerance; regulatory processes in autoimmunity and transplantation and extrathymic T cell maturation.

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