School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 43 Results

  • Lesley Park

    Lesley Park

    Instructor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences (PHS)
    Associate Director, Education (2019-present)
    Director, PHS Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018-present)
    Associate Director, Research and Data Strategy (2016-2019)

    Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS)
    Cancer Core Co-Director

    Dr. Lesley Park is one of the leaders of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences and the VACS Cancer Core. PHS aims to provide a central hub where researchers can efficiently access, link, visualize, and analyze data from a wide variety of sources to ultimately facilitate transdisciplinary population health science research. Within the VACS, Dr. Park oversees cancer outcomes research in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Her research experience has focused on the intersection of cancer and HIV, examining epidemiologic methods for cancer research, cancer incidence trends, and cancer (particularly hepatocellular carcinoma) prevention in PLWHA. Dr. Park is an experienced epidemiologist, skilled in observational research, survival analysis, and SAS programming. Her prior experience includes research at the Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research (CBAR) at the Harvard School of Public Health and at the Yale School of Medicine.

  • Walter Park

    Walter Park

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Park's research interests are in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cysts, acute and chronic pancreatitis. His approach incorporates methods in health services research including the use of observational datasets, cost-effectiveness studies, and the development of clinical cohorts.

  • Jane Parnes

    Jane Parnes

    Professor of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lab is studying the mechanisms controlling B cell responsiveness and the balance between tolerance and autoimmunity. B cells deficient in CD72 are hyperresponsive to stimulation through the B cell receptor. We are examining the alterations in B cell signaling in these B cells and the mechanisms by which CD72 deficiency partially abrogates anergic tolerance. We hope to learn how deficiency in CD72 leads to spontaneous autoimmunity and increased susceptibility to induced autoimmune disease.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Ria Paul

    Ria Paul

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Bio Clinical Focus
    .Internal Medicine
    .Geriatric Medicine
    .Wellness
    .Focus on Health Disparities in Elderly Population

  • Mark Pegram

    Mark Pegram

    Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms of targeted therapy resistance in breast and other cancers

  • Marco Perez

    Marco Perez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Marco Perez's research goal is to better understand the fundamental causes of cardiovascular disease through the study of genetics and epidemiology. His group studies the genetic variations and environmental exposures that are associated with conditions such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure. He has led the studies of atrial fibrillation in Women's Health Initiative, one of the largest nation-wide population-based cohorts. He is currently conducting a large study monitoring for silent or asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in women from the WHI randomized to exercise intervention, and is co-PI in the Apple Heart Study, a clinical trial using the Apple Watch to screen for atrial fibrillation. He is interested in understanding the paradox that atrial fibrillation is less common in African Americans and Hispanics, despite a greater burden of risk factors such as hypertension. As director of the Stanford Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic, he evaluates families with rare inherited arrhythmias associated with sudden death such as Long QT and Brugada Syndromes and explores their links with novel genes. He is particularly interested in studying the genetic causes of very early onset atrial fibrillation. He also studies how best to use the electrocardiogram to identify patients at risk for atrial fibrillation and athletes at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias due to conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. His genetic studies have led to the discovery of promising novel therapeutic targets that his group is now studying at a functional level. Dr. Perez receives funding from NIH/NHLBI (R01), Apple Inc., the Weston Havens Foundation, The Stanford Cardiovascular Division and the Stanford SPARK program.

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: