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  • Martin Pfaller

    Martin Pfaller

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cardiology

    Bio I am a postdoc in the group of Alison Marsden, where I focus on cardio­vascular blood flow simulations. As a visiting student researcher with Ellen Kuhl at Stanford, I became fascinated with the application of computer simulations to medical problems. I graduated from the Technical University of Munich with a Ph.D., where I co-founded a group dedicated to the prediction of cardiovascular diseases using simulation methods. Since then, my research mission has been to make simulations more accurate and more accessible for clinicians. During my doctoral studies, we enhanced mechanical models by studying the interaction between the myocardium and the pericardium. We demonstrated how model order reduction could be used to speed up model personalization from patient data, such as cine MRI or blood pressure measurements. We also showed how simulations could enable patient-specific therapy planning of radiofrequency catheter ablation in atrial fibrillation. I am currently working on an NIH-funded project to improve reproducibility in blood flow simulations with data curation methods. We are developing a public repository of patient-specific simulations where other scientists can submit their simulations and automatically regain feedback. My long-term vision is to develop combined physics-based and data-based approaches to enable personalized therapies for the cardiovascular system.

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