School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 26 Results

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Recent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that T cell based immunotherapy can eradicate cancers resistant to all other available therapies. Our program creates, develops and optimizes genetically engineered T cells to treat cancer. We link the bench with the bedside, developing novel therapies for early phase testing in clinical trials, while simultaneously conducting intensive studies on clinical samples obtained from patients treated on immunotherapy trials.

  • Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Redlich Professor, Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Multiple NIH funded projects to characterize CNS mechanisms of human pain. Comparative effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and chronic pain self-management within the context of opioid reduction (PCORI funded). Single session pain catastrophizing treatment: comparative efficacy & mechanisms (NIH R01). Development and implementation of an open-source learning healthcare system, CHOIR (http://choir/stanford.edu), to optimize pain care and innovative research in real-world patients.

  • Holden Maecker

    Holden Maecker

    Professor (Research) of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm interested in immune monitoring of T cell responses to chronic pathogens and cancer, and the correlation of T cell response signatures with disease protection.

  • Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    RZ Cao Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Majeti lab focuses on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our lab uses experimental hematology methods, stem cell assays, genome editing, and bioinformatics to define and investigate drivers of leukemia stem cell behavior. As part of these studies, we have led the development and application of robust xenotransplantation assays for human hematopoietic cells.

  • Robbie Majzner

    Robbie Majzner

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Robbie Majzner is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, Dr. Majzner attended Harvard Medical School, where he developed an interest in pediatric oncology. He completed his residency training in pediatrics at New York Presbyterian-Columbia and fellowship training in pediatric hematology-oncology at Johns Hopkins and the National Cancer Institute. During his fellowship, he cared for some of the first pediatric patients to receive CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, children with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who often had no other therapeutic option. Witnessing the success of CAR T cells in these patients drove Dr. Majzner to the laboratory, where he focuses on extending the use of CAR T cells to solid tumors. He has generated and optimized novel receptors to recognize antigens over-expressed on pediatric solid tumors such as GD2 (Mount/Majzner et al., Nature Medicine, 2018) B7-H3 (Majzner et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019), and ALK (Walker/Majzner et al., Molecular Therapy, 2017). Current work focuses on imparting multi-specificity to CAR T cells and optimizing these receptors to enhance their efficacy when the amount of target (antigen density) is limiting (Majzner et al., Cancer Discovery, 2020). By drawing on state of the art bioengineering techniques, the Majzner Laboratory focuses on enhancing the potency and specificity of CAR T cells for children with cancer.

    Clinically, Dr. Majzner cares for all patients with neuroblastoma at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and has a specific interest in bringing novel immunotherapies to clinical trials for these patients and those with other solid tumors. He is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric hematology-oncology.

  • Parag Mallick

    Parag Mallick

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Mallick Lab is focused on using integrative, multi-omic approaches to model the processes that govern cellular dynamics and to use those models to discover cancer biomarkers and molecular mechanisms.

  • M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Marinkovich lab studies the function of epithelial extracellular matrix molecules, including integrins, collagens and laminins in epithelial development and carcinoma progression. We apply our discoveries in this area towards development of molecular therapies for carcinomas, hair disease and inherited epithelial adhesive disorders.

  • Olivia Martinez

    Olivia Martinez

    Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Host-Pathogen interactions; EBV B cell lymphomas; pathways of immune evasion in the growth and survival of EBV B cell lymphomas; mechanisms of graft rejection and tolerance induction; stem cell and solid organ transplantation.

  • Suleiman Alfred Massarweh

    Suleiman Alfred Massarweh

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My work is focused in investigating mechanisms of endocrine resistance in ER-positive breast cancer and novel clinical trial designs of combined ER and targeted therapeutics. Primary areas of investigation are in metastatic disease and preoperative clinical trials.
    Additional areas of interest include breast cancer in young women, in men, and breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy.

  • Tarik F. Massoud, MD, PhD

    Tarik F. Massoud, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current interests are in molecular and translational imaging of the brain especially in neuro-oncology and cerebrovascular diseases, experimental aspects of neuroimaging, clinical neuroradiology, neuroradiological anatomy, and research education and academic training of radiologists and scientists.

  • AC Matin

    AC Matin

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Improvement of our newly discovered cancer prodrug regimen that permits noninvaisve visualization of drug activation. 2. Tracking tumors & cancer metastases using bacterial magnetite and newly developed single-cell tracking by MRI. 3. Molecular basis of bacterial planktonic and biofilm antibiotic resistance on Earth and under space microgravity -- development of new countermeasures; 4. Bioremediation.

  • Uchechukwu Megwalu, MD, MPH

    Uchechukwu Megwalu, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Outcomes Research
    Comparative Effectiveness Research
    Health Literacy
    Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology
    SEER database analysis

  • Everett Meyer

    Everett Meyer

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focus in T cell immunotherapy and T cell immune monitoring using high-throughput sequencing and genomic approaches, with an emphasis on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the treatment of graft-versus-host disease and immune tolerance induction.

  • Tobias Meyer

    Tobias Meyer

    Mrs. George A. Winzer Professor in Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests CELLULAR INFORMATION PROCESSING. We are using live single-cell microscopy approaches to understand the design principles of cell signaling circuits. Mammalian signaling processes have a unique logic due to the large number of signaling proteins, second messengers and chromatin modifiers involved in each decision process. We are particularly interested in understanding how cells make decisions to enter and exit the cell cycle and how they decide to polarize and move.

  • David Miklos

    David Miklos

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Miklos is the Clinical Director of Stanford University?s Center for Cancer Cell Therapy, and leads Stanford?s CAR therapy clinical trials for patients with aggressive lymphomas: 1) Phase I CAR19-22 Safety and efficacy outcomes ? the first bispecific CAR-T study for patients with rel/refractory DLBCL and ALL, 2) CAR19 CD4-CD8 immune phenotyping following various CAR-T, 3) Mechanisms for CAR-T DLBCL treatment Failure

  • Leah S. Millheiser, MD,FACOG,IF

    Leah S. Millheiser, MD,FACOG,IF

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - General

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interest in the role of the central nervous system in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

  • Lloyd B. Minor, MD

    Lloyd B. Minor, MD

    The Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Professorship for the Dean of the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology?Head & Neck Surgery and, by courtesy, of Neurobiology and Bioengineering

    Bio Lloyd B. Minor, MD, is a scientist, surgeon, and academic leader. He is the Carl and Elizabeth Naumann Dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine, a position he has held since December 2012.

    As dean, Dr. Minor plays an integral role in setting strategy for the clinical enterprise of Stanford Medicine, an academic medical center that includes the Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care, and Stanford Children?s Health and Lucile Packard Children?s Hospital Stanford. He also oversees the quality of Stanford Medicine?s physician practices and growing clinical networks.

    With Dr. Minor?s leadership, Stanford Medicine has established a strategic vision to lead the biomedical revolution in Precision Health. The next generation of health care, Precision Health is focused on keeping people healthy and providing care that is tailored to individual variations. It?s predictive, proactive, preemptive, personalized, and patient-centered.

    An advocate for innovation, Dr. Minor has provided significant support for fundamental science and for clinical and translational research at Stanford. Through bold initiatives in medical education and increased support for PhD students, Dr. Minor is committed to inspiring and training future leaders.

    Among other accomplishments Dr. Minor has led the development and implementation of an innovative model for cancer research and patient care delivery at Stanford Medicine and has launched an initiative in biomedical data science to harness the power of big data and create a learning health care system. Committed to diversity, he has increased student financial aid and expanded faculty leadership opportunities.

    Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Minor was provost and senior vice president for academic affairs of The Johns Hopkins University. During his time as provost, Dr. Minor launched many university-wide initiatives such as the Gateway Sciences Initiative to support pedagogical innovation, and the Doctor of Philosophy Board to promote excellence in PhD education. He worked with others around the university and health system to coordinate the Individualized Health Initiative, which aimed to use genetic information to transform health care.

    Prior to his appointment as provost in 2009, Dr. Minor served as the Andelot Professor and director (chair) of the Department of Otolaryngology?Head and Neck Surgery in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and otolaryngologist-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. During his six-year tenure, he expanded annual research funding by more than half and increased clinical activity by more than 30 percent, while strengthening teaching efforts and student training.

    With more than 140 published articles and chapters, Dr. Minor is an expert in balance and inner ear disorders. Through neurophysiological investigations of eye movements and neuronal pathways, his work has identified adaptive mechanisms responsible for compensation to vestibular injury in a model system for studies of motor learning (the vestibulo-ocular reflex). The synergies between this basic research and clinical studies have led to improved methods for the diagnosis and treatment of balance disorders. In recognition of his work in refining a treatment for Ménière?s disease, Dr. Minor received the Prosper Ménière Society?s gold medal in 2010.

    In the medical community, Dr. Minor is perhaps best known for his discovery of superior canal dehiscence syndrome, a debilitating disorder characterized by sound- or pressure-induced dizziness. In 1998 Dr. Minor and colleagues published a description of the clinical manifestations of the syndrome and related its cause to an opening (dehiscence) in the bone covering the superior canal. He subsequently developed a surgical procedure that corrects the problem and alleviates symptoms.

    In 2012, Dr. Minor was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, formerly the Institute of Medicine.

  • Beverly S. Mitchell, M.D.

    Beverly S. Mitchell, M.D.

    George E. Becker Professor in Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Beverly Mitchell's research relates to the development of new therapies for hematologic malignancies, including leukemias and myelodsyplastic syndromes. She is interested in preclinical proof of principle studies on mechanisms inducing cell death and on metabolic targets involving nucleic acid biosynthesis in malignant cells. She is also interested in the translation of these studies into clinical trials.

  • Daria Mochly-Rosen

    Daria Mochly-Rosen

    The George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Two areas: 1. Using rationally-designed peptide inhibitors to study protein-protein interactions in cell signaling. Focus: protein kinase C in heart and large GTPases regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegdenration. 2. Using small molecules (identified in a high throughput screens and synthetic chemistry) as activators and inhibitors of aldehyde dehydrogenases, a family of detoxifying enzymes, and glucose-6-phoshate dehydrogenase, in normal cells and in models of human diseases.

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